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Given this schema (in postgresql-9.2):

CREATE TABLE foo (
   id serial PRIMARY KEY,
   ...other columns elided...
);

CREATE TYPE event_type AS ENUM ('start', 'stop');

CREATE TABLE foo_event (
   id serial PRIMARY KEY,
   foo_id integer NOT NULL REFERENCES foo (id),
   timestamp timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
   type event_type NOT NULL
);

How can I get all "running" foos? That is, foos whose most recent event is a 'start', or, even better, foos who were started at least once, and have no stops after their last start (in case I add more event types in the future).


My best attempt so far is:

SELECT * FROM foo
 WHERE id NOT IN
 (SELECT foo_id FROM foo_event
  WHERE type='stop');

The problem here is, of course, that it'll never return any foos that have ever been stopped.

share|improve this question
    
Why to use NOT in. Instead use IN without where clause in sub query. That will give both types of record s –  Shridhar Feb 20 '13 at 3:07
    
Can there be multiple start events without corresponding stop events? If not, something along these lines: GROUP BY foo_id HAVING SUM(CASE event_type = 'start' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) > SUM(CASE event_type = 'stop' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END –  ronin Feb 20 '13 at 3:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using a MAX() aggregate to retrieve the most recent start event per foo_id group, you can do a LEFT JOIN against a subquery which retrieves the most recent (also MAX()) stop event which is greater than the start event in the ON clause. Look for those with NULLs in the stop events subquery, meaning no match.

SELECT 
  foo.*,
  fstart.*
FROM 
  foo 
  INNER JOIN (
   /* Left side gets most recent start events */
   SELECT
    foo_id, 
    MAX(timestamp) AS start_ts
   FROM
    foo_event
   WHERE event_type = 'start'
   GROUP BY foo_id
 ) fstart ON foo.id = fstart.foo_id
 /* Right side gets most recent stop events */
 LEFT JOIN (
  SELECT
    foo_id,
    MAX(timestamp) AS stop_ts
  FROM
    foo_event
  WHERE event_type = 'stop'
  GROUP BY foo_id
 /* JOIN rows that have a greater stop time than start time */
 ) fstop ON fstart.foo_id = fstop.foo_id AND fstop.stop_ts > fstart.start_ts
 /* And find rows where there's no matching stop event greater than the start */
WHERE fstop.stop_ts IS NULL

And look at that, it actually works! http://sqlfiddle.com/#!12/8642d/1

Note, use >= rather than > in the ON clause, if a stop event can end at the same time as its corresponding start event...

share|improve this answer
    
Hey this is awesome! Looking at the query plan I see it's doing table scans (of course). What indexes should I add to avoid that? foo_event.timestamp, foo_event.type, any others? –  Dan Feb 20 '13 at 3:40
    
@Dan Index foo_id definitely, maybe a compound index across (foo_id, timestamp)? –  Michael Berkowski Feb 20 '13 at 3:41
    
I think only the foo_event.type index gets used according to my parsing of sqlfiddle.com/#!12/4e752/1/0 -- anyway, thanks a bunch! –  Dan Feb 20 '13 at 3:50
    
@Dan You're welcome, good luck. –  Michael Berkowski Feb 20 '13 at 3:53

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