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My question is general, but I will explain it using a specific example.

Suppose I need to communicate time between two applications. A simple way is to have one application write the output of gettimeofday() (tv_sec and tv_usec) to a file and let the other app read it. The second app needs to 'convert' the strings in order to get an instance of timeval.

Is there any way to avoid the conversion?

Is there a better way to do this than simple file write/read?

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1  
If you use the ::time() function from the ctime (or time.h) header, you get it as the number of seconds since the epoch. If you store this, no string parsing / conversion will be required. –  jogojapan Feb 20 '13 at 2:57
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Write the structure to a binary file? Also, read more about IPC. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 20 '13 at 2:57
    
tons of ways: pipes, sockets, shared memory etc. –  Öö Tiib Feb 20 '13 at 2:57
    
@jogojapan can you give me an example code please. rmind you that I need to store time into a file and retrive from it. How can I use ::time() or timeval? thanks –  rahman Feb 20 '13 at 5:34
1  
@rahman Just use the code given by Johnsyweb. You can write the time_t (which is basically an integer) to file. On the receiving end, you read that from file. If you need timeval just create an empty timeval object and set its tv_sec member to the value stored in the time_t. –  jogojapan Feb 20 '13 at 5:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming both processes are on the same machine (or at least on machines of the same architecture), the results of std::time() (from <ctime>) will be seconds since the Epoch, and will not need any conversion:

std::time_t seconds_since_epoch = std::time(NULL);

Disclaimer: This is not the best method of and you will need to lock the file for reading while it is being written, etc. Just answering the question.


Update, following comment.

If you need to write a timeval, perhaps the easiest way is to define << and >> operators for timeval and write and read these as text to the file (no need to worry about byte-ordering) as-is (with no conversion):

std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& out, timeval const& tv)
{
    return out << tv.tv_sec << " " << tv.tv_usec;
}

std::istream& operator >>(std::istream& is, timeval& tv)
{
    return is >> tv.tv_sec >> tv.tv_usec;
}

This will allow you to do the following (ignoring concurrency):

// Writer
{
    timeval tv;
    gettimeofday(&tv, NULL);
    std::ofstream timefile(filename, std::ofstream::trunc);
    timefile << tv << std::endl;
}

// Reader
{
    timeval tv;
    std::ifstream timefile(filename);
    timefile >> tv;
}

If both process are running concurrently, you'll need to lock the file. Here's an example using Boost:

// Writer
{
    timeval tv;
    gettimeofday(&tv, NULL);
    file_lock lock(filename);

    scoped_lock<file_lock> lock_the_file(lock);

    std::ofstream timefile(filename, std::ofstream::trunc);
    timefile << tv << std::endl;
    timefile.flush();
}

// Reader
{
    timeval tv;
    file_lock lock(filename);

    sharable_lock<file_lock> lock_the_file(lock);

    std::ifstream timefile(filename);
    timefile >> tv;

    std::cout << tv << std::endl;
}

...I've omitted the exception handling (when the file does not exist) for clarity; you'd need to add this to any production-worthy code.

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I am trying to use your first suggestion before reading more about IPC. but I am not able to do that. Is it possible you kindly give me an example. BTW, I need timeval not time_t coz I need usec element also. thanks for helping out. –  rahman Feb 20 '13 at 5:32
    
I have to get back to you on this. I should try this myself first. thanks –  rahman Feb 20 '13 at 7:51
    
@rahman: I've added some examples. –  Johnsyweb Feb 21 '13 at 1:06
    
oh john. that's cool :) thanks a lot –  rahman Feb 21 '13 at 4:47
1  
@rahman: Absolutely you do. Think about what could happen should the writer truncate the file and start writing while the reader is part-way through reading. –  Johnsyweb Feb 21 '13 at 6:19

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