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I have two algorithms.

A. Solves problem in 2^n seconds.

B. Solves problem in n^2 + 1,000,000 seconds.

How can I inductively prove that B is faster than A.

I'm told that 2^n > 2n+1 for n>2 might be useful for this problem. I've been cracking my head and can't solve this problem. Thanks.

"n" is equivalent to the size of the program.

EDIT: For all n > 19.

SOLUTION:

Premise: n^2 + 1,000,000 < 2^n

Basis:
n = 20
1000400 < 1048576 TRUE

Induction:

(n+1)^2 + 1000000 > 2^(n+1)
n^2 +2n +1 +1000000 > 2^(n+1)
Apply 2^n > 2n + 1
n^2 + 1000000 > 2^(n+1)

This last line implies that B is always bigger than A.

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1  
Faster? For all n? –  xpda Feb 20 '13 at 3:53
    
Yes, n being the size of the program. So from small to very large. –  amorimluc Feb 20 '13 at 3:55
1  
Differentiate 3 times. –  Mehrdad Feb 20 '13 at 3:55
1  
This is more like a math problem than programming... –  Pinch Feb 20 '13 at 3:56
1  
It's analysis of algorithms. O(2^n) > O(n^2) -- exponential vs. geometric. –  xpda Feb 20 '13 at 3:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As you said the base case is proven. ie k^2<2^k for k>=5

For the induction, let us assume that

k^2<2^k

We need to prove that

(k+1)^2<2^(k+1)

(k+1)^2 = k^2 + 2k + 1 < 2^k + 2k + 1

We know that (k-1)^2>=0. thus k^2>=2k-1

2^k + 2k + 1 = 2^k + 2k -1 + 2 <= 2^k + k^2 + 2 < 2^k + 2^k +2= 2^(k+1) + 2

Argh, i feel like im almost there. any help?

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Induction involves proving for an initial value before moving to k, k+1. This is not included in the answer. –  questzen Feb 20 '13 at 4:24
    
you mean base case? –  smk Feb 20 '13 at 4:25
    
Yes, typically prove for 1, assume for k, and deduce for k+1. MI works when the statement is valid for all natural numbers. So applying the logic of 2^n > n^2 wont work! –  questzen Feb 20 '13 at 4:32
    
The base would be n = 20. The induction step is the hard part. Would you mind adding the intermediate steps (including when you use the induction hypothesis)? –  amorimluc Feb 20 '13 at 4:34
    
Why is the base case n=20, doing some mental calculations i can see that k^2<2^k for k>=5 –  smk Feb 20 '13 at 4:35

B will only be faster if n > 19.9321. If you don't need the actual work, then here is where I got the answer from.

For any numbers less than 19.9321, then A will be faster.

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+1 However, n is almost certainly going to be an integer in this case. –  Jonathon Reinhart Feb 20 '13 at 3:59
    
What I'm trying to understand is how to go about proving that B is faster through induction. –  amorimluc Feb 20 '13 at 4:02

Python as a calculator:

>>> n = 20
>>>
>>> 2**n
1048576
>>> n**2 + 1000000
1000400
>>>
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don't know about using induction, but I think this could be helpful: notice, first of all that the logarithm is a monotonically increasing function. So, log(a)>log(b) iff a > b (i)

Notice that log(n^2) > log(n^2 + 1 000 000) (ii)

also, log(n^2) = 2log(n)

clearly, nlog2 > 2 logn for large n, so,

     log(2^n) > log(n^2) from (i)

so, log(2^n) > log(n^2) > log(n^2 + 1 000 000) from (ii)

therefore,

      log(2^n) >  log(n^2 + 1 000 000) 

and again from (i),

  2^n > n^2 + 1 000 000

what do you think?

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