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I am trying to understand disadvantages of using Linux kernel modules. I understand the benefits of using it: the ability to dynamically insert code into running system without having to recompile and reboot base system. Given this strong advantage, I was guessing most of kernel code should then go as kernel modules instead as part of base kernel, but that does not seem to be the case. Good amount of core sus-systems (like memory management, or file-system used by root drive) still go as base kernel.

One reason I can think of is that kernel modules are loaded very late in boot process and hence core functionality has to go in base kernel. Another reason I read was about fragmentation.

I didn't really understand why kernel modules cause memory fragmentation, can someone please explain? Are there any other downsides of using kernel modules ?

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closed as off topic by DocMax, EdChum, Daniel Hilgarth, cweiske, alxx Feb 20 '13 at 8:22

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This is a good question for unix.stackexchange.com – Paolo Feb 20 '13 at 6:09
    
Thanks @Guandalino, moved it. – spa Feb 20 '13 at 14:52
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I am trying to understand disadvantages of using Linux kernel modules. I understand the benefits of using it: the ability to dynamically insert code into running system without having to recompile and reboot base system.

While this is occasionally useful, it is not a primary reason why modules exist. Their main purpose is to allow kernel code which is not always needed to be loaded on demand, rather than always being resident in memory.

Good amount of core sus-systems (like memory management, or file-system used by root drive) still go as base kernel.

This is because not all kernel components can be configured as modules; only ones for which it makes sense to load code on demand. Memory management, for instance, is not modular, since it can never be not present. (And because it's needed to load modules!)

(Your second example is actually wrong. The filesystem used for the root filesystem can be configured as a module if it is available in an initrd.)

I didn't really understand why kernel modules cause memory fragmentation, can someone please explain?

They don't, at least not to any significant degree. Kernel modules tend to be small, so any fragmentation they cause is minimal.

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