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Suppose i have this django model

class Article(object):
       title = models.CharField(max_length=320)
       body  = models.CharField(max_length=320)
       def __init__(self):
              setattr(Article,"user",get_logged_username())

That was just the sample code

I just want to know that as i am setting the class attribute not instance attribute so will my every user have the same user attribute

like initially it is john then some othe rperson his browser and click on add new article

then if i check my user then it will be same his username or not

share|improve this question
    
You said yourself 'every user have the same user attribute'. Obviously the attribute isn't going to vary over users. –  Volatility Feb 20 '13 at 6:34
    
Note that setattr(Article, "user", …) is more simply directly written Article.user = …. –  EOL Feb 20 '13 at 6:36
    
Are you sure you really want that every article in the database should have the same user? –  6502 Feb 20 '13 at 6:36
1  
I believe CharField is actually a descriptor, so there are more complex things going on than a simply assignment when you set title and body attributes on the instance. –  Bakuriu Feb 20 '13 at 6:57
    
@Bakuriu can you please elaborate in detail what u want to say. that looks interesting to me –  user192082107 Feb 20 '13 at 7:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Take care that each creation of a new instance will put the class attribute user at the same value:

class Article(object):
       title = '111'
       body  = '222'
       def __init__(self):
              setattr(Article,"user",145)

aaaaaaa = Article()
print '# aaaaaaa = Article()  /done'
print '  aaaaaaa.__dict__ == %r ' % aaaaaaa.__dict__
print '  aaaaaaa.user == %r ' % aaaaaaa.user
print '  Article.user == %r\n' % Article.user

aaaaaaa.user = 2000
print '# aaaaaaa.user = 2000  /done'
print '  aaaaaaa.__dict__ == %r ' % aaaaaaa.__dict__
print '  aaaaaaa.user == %r ' % aaaaaaa.user
print '  Article.user == %r\n' % Article.user

Article.user = 'JUJU'
print "# Article.user = 'JUJU'  /done"
print '  aaaaaaa.__dict__ == %r ' % aaaaaaa.__dict__
print '  aaaaaaa.user == %r ' % aaaaaaa.user
print '  Article.user == %r\n' % Article.user

bbbbbbb = Article()
print '# bbbbbbb = Article()  /done'
print '  aaaaaaa.__dict__ == %r ' % aaaaaaa.__dict__
print '  aaaaaaa.user == %r ' % aaaaaaa.user
print '    bbbbbbb.__dict__ == %r ' % bbbbbbb.__dict__
print '    bbbbbbb.user == %r ' % bbbbbbb.user
print '    Article.user == %r ' % Article.user

result

# aaaaaaa = Article()  /done
  aaaaaaa.__dict__ == {} 
  aaaaaaa.user == 145 
  Article.user == 145

# aaaaaaa.user = 2000  /done
  aaaaaaa.__dict__ == {'user': 2000} 
  aaaaaaa.user == 2000 
  Article.user == 145

# Article.user = 'JUJU'  /done
  aaaaaaa.__dict__ == {'user': 2000} 
  aaaaaaa.user == 2000 
  Article.user == 'JUJU'

# bbbbbbb = Article()  /done
  aaaaaaa.__dict__ == {'user': 2000} 
  aaaaaaa.user == 2000 
    bbbbbbb.__dict__ == {} 
    bbbbbbb.user == 145 
    Article.user == 145
share|improve this answer

It looks like you want to set the instance attribute, not the class attribute.

setattr(self,"user",get_logged_username())

Or...

this.user = get_logged_username()

If you want all instances of the class to initially have a name attribute of john, just make when when you declare the class.

class Article:
    name = 'john'
share|improve this answer

You are setting a class attribute, here, since Article is a class.

This means that all your instances will share this attribute:

>>> class Article(object):
...     def __init__(self, user):
...         Article.user = user
...         

>>> article_john = Article('John')
>>> article_elli = Article('Ellie')                                                 

>>> article_john.user  # Modified by the second Article creation!
'Ellie'

Note, however, that the objects (instances) can have their own user attribute, which overrides the class attribute:

>>> article_john.user = 'This was initially John'
>>> article_ellie.user  # Unmodified, because it access the class attribute Article.user
'Ellie'

Per-instance attributes are simply set with self.user = get_logged_username().

share|improve this answer

When setting class attributes, you may want to limit yourself to objects that will be shared across many or all instances of that class. For values that will change or be unique to each instance, set them in the init() method.

For example, you may have a threading.Lock instance that is used when creating an instance, and then a per-instance threading.Lock that will be engaged for per-instance synchronization tasks.

class Article:
    creation = threading.Lock
    count = 0

    def __init__ (self):
        Article.creation.acquire ()

        self.id = Article.count
        self.lock = threading.Lock

        Article.count += 1
        Article.creation.release ()


    def critical (self):
        self.lock.acquire ()

        # Something sensitive happens here.

        self.lock.release ()

To go back to your original question, you likely want:

class Article(object):

   def __init__(self):
       self.title = models.CharField(max_length=320)
       self.body  = models.CharField(max_length=320)
       self.user  = get_logged_username()
share|improve this answer

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