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while maintaining my colleague's code from even someone who claims to be a senior developer, I often see the following code:

try
{
  //do something
}
catch
{
  //Do nothing
}

or sometimes they write logging information to log files like following try catch block

try
{
  //do some work
}
catch(Exception exception)
{
   WriteException2LogFile(exception);
}

I am just wondering if what they have done is the best practice? It makes me confused because in my thinking users should know what happens with the system.

Please give me some advice.

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48  
Snippet #1 is 99.999% of the time unacceptable. –  leppie Feb 20 '13 at 6:33
6  
Displaying exception directly to user is never a good idea mainly for two reasons: 1. if it's usual user (s)he will be annoyed reading error message that tells very few for him/her. 2. if (s)he's, so called, hacker (s)he may get useful information. The best practice, IMO, is to log exception and show friendly error message. –  Leri Feb 20 '13 at 6:35
1  
@leppie If something unexpected occurs (like NullReference or ArgumentNull that is not part of application flow) it means that there's a bug that needs to be fixed so logging them will help to debug your code much faster. –  Leri Feb 20 '13 at 6:42
6  
Using a try-catch block to hide an exception is generally the result of lazy programming. It's a shortcut that is often used instead of writing validation code to test inputs. Very occasionally there are times when an exception may arise that doesn't affect the operation of your code, and hiding it like this might be OK. This is fairly rare however. –  Corey Feb 20 '13 at 6:43
7  
@Toan, well, if it's a batch job, I'm catching at the top level (Main) to log, and then rethrowing to set off an alarm that the job terminated abnormally. If it's a web app, I'm letting the exception bubble to a global handler, logging, and then redirecting the user to an error screen. Your use case scenario dictates what you do with that exception after you've logged or otherwise handled it. –  Anthony Pegram Feb 20 '13 at 6:46

13 Answers 13

up vote 49 down vote accepted

My exception handling strategy is :

  • To catch all unhandled exceptions by hooking to the Application.ThreadException event, then decide :

    • For a UI application: to pop it to the user with an apology message (winforms)
    • For a Service or a Console application: log it to a file (service or console)

Then I always enclose every piece of code that is run externally in try/catch :

  • All events fired by the Winforms infrastructure (Load, Click, SelectedChanged...)
  • All events fired by third party components

Then I enclose in 'try/catch'

  • All the operations that I know might not work all the time (IO operations, calculations with a potential zero division...). In such a case, I throw a new ApplicationException("custom message", innerException) to keep track of what really happened

Additionally, I try my best to sort exceptions correctly. There are exceptions which:

  • need to be shown to the user immediately
  • require some extra processing to put things together when they happen to avoid cascading problems (ie: put .EndUpdate in the finally section during a TreeView fill)
  • the user does not care, but it is important to know what happened. So I always log them:

    • In the event log
    • or in a .log file on the disk

It is a good practice to design some static methods to handle exceptions in the application top level error handlers.

I also force myself to try to:

  • Remember ALL exceptions are bubbled up to the top level. It is not necessary to put exception handlers everywhere.
  • Reusable or deep called functions does not need to display or log exceptions : they are eigher bubbled up automatically or rethrown with some custom messages in my exception handlers.

So finally :

Bad:

// DON'T DO, THIS IS BAD
try
{
    ...
}
catch 
{
   // only air...
}

Useless:

// DONT'T DO, THIS IS USELESS
try
{
    ...
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    throw ex;
}

What I do at the top level:

// i.e When the user clicks on a button
try
{
    ...
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    ex.Log(ex); // Log exception
    // ex.LogAndDisplay(ex); // Log exception, then show it to the user with apologies...
}

What I do in some called functions:

// Calculation module
try
{
    ...
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    // Add useful information to the exception
    throw new ApplicationException("Something wrong happened in the calculation module :", ex);
}

// IO module
try
{
    ...
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    throw new ApplicationException(string.Format("I cannot write the file {0} to {1}", fileName, directoryName), ex);
}

There is a lot to do with exception handling (Custom Exceptions) but thoses rules I try to keep in mind are enough for the simple applications I do.

share|improve this answer
22  
catch(Exception ex) { throw ex; } in C# is worse than redundant (regardless of the exception type you're catching). To rethrow, use throw;. With the former, the exception will look like it originated from your throw ex whereas with the latter, it will properly originate from the original throw statement. –  Michael Kjörling Feb 20 '13 at 12:38
1  
Why do you hook the Application.ThreadException event and wrap every exception with a catch(Exception ex) {ex.Log(ex);}. I would probably agree that the former is an excellent practice, but the latter adds the risk of duplicating your error logs and hides that the exception happened. Also throw ex is very very bad. –  Keith Feb 20 '13 at 13:18
1  
I understood about catch(Exception ex) { throw ex; } being useless. So I suppose "redundant" is not the best word to state "Don't do this". That's why I changed the post a bit to state better that the two first example of try catch have to be avoided. –  Larry Feb 20 '13 at 14:44
1  
@Keith Because ThreadException only let us catch Unhandled exceptions and let the program continue, I dont think there is a risk to log exception twice. However, it let the program continue, and this may be an issue. There is some interresting pointers about this here: stackoverflow.com/questions/2014562/… –  Larry Feb 20 '13 at 14:56
    
Great and constructive answer, most of all I enjoyed the phrase Only air :) And thanks for the Application.ThreadException event, I wasn't aware of that, very useful. –  Mahdi Tahsildari Mar 10 at 4:23

Best practice is that exception handling should never hide issues. This means that try-catch blocks should be extremely rare.

There are 3 circumstances were using a try-catch makes sense.

  1. Always deal with known exceptions as low-down as you can. However, if you're expecting an exception it's usually better practice to test for it first. For instance parse, formatting and arithmetic exceptions are nearly always better handled by logic checks first, rather than a specific try-catch.

  2. If you need to do something on an exception (for instance logging or roll back a transaction) then re-throw the exception.

  3. Always deal with unknown exceptions as high-up as you can - the only code that should consume an exception and not re-throw it should be the UI or public API.

Suppose you're connecting to a remote API, here you know to expect certain errors (and have things to in those circumstances), so this is case 1:

try 
{
    remoteApi.Connect()
}
catch(ApiConnectionSecurityException ex) 
{
    // User's security details have expired
    return false;
}

return true;

Note that no other exceptions are caught, as they are not expected.

Now suppose that you're trying to save something to the database. We have to roll it back if it fails, so we have case 2:

try
{
    DBConnection.Save();
}
catch
{
    // Roll back the DB changes so they aren't corrupted on ANY exception
    DBConnection.Rollback();

    // Re-throw the exception, it's critical that the user knows that it failed to save
    throw;
}

Note that we re-throw the exception - the code higher up still needs to know that something has failed.

Finally we have the UI - here we don't want to have completely unhandled exceptions, but we don't want to hide them either. Here we have an example of case 3:

try
{
    // Do something
}
catch(Exception ex) 
{
    // Log exception for developers
    WriteException2LogFile(ex);

    // Display message to users
    DisplayWarningBox("An error has occurred, please contact support!");
}

However, most API or UI frameworks have generic ways of doing case 3. For instance ASP.Net has a yellow error screen that dumps the exception details, but that can be replaced with a more generic message in the production environment. Following those is best practice because it saves you a lot of code, but also because error logging and display should be config decisions rather than hard-coded.

This all means that case 1 (known exceptions) and case 3 (one-off UI handling) both have better patterns (avoid the expected error or hand error handling off to the UI).

Even case 2 can be replaced by better patterns, for instance transaction scopes (using blocks that rollback any transaction not committed during the block) make it harder for developers to get the best practice pattern wrong.

For instance suppose you have a large scale ASP.Net application. Error logging can be via ELMAH, error display can be an informative YSoD locally and a nice localised message in production. Database connections can all be via transaction scopes and using blocks. You don't need a single try-catch block.

TL;DR: Best practice is actually to not use try-catch blocks at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Good remark about "throw" to re throw an exception –  Larry Feb 20 '13 at 15:07
1  
@Jorj you should read the whole post, and if you still disagree perhaps it would be more constructive to counter one of my supporting arguments rather than just state that you don't like my conclusion. There's nearly always a better pattern than try-catch - it can (very occasionally) be useful and I'm not arguing that you should never use them, but 99% of the time there's a better way. –  Keith Nov 19 '13 at 8:24

An exception is a fatal error.

First of all, the best practice should be don't throwing exceptions for any kind of error but only if it's a blocking error.

If the error is fatal, then throw the exception. Once the exception is already thrown, there's no need to hide it because it's exceptional: let the user know about it (you should reformat the whole exception to something useful to the user in the UI).

Your job as software developer will be always trying to don't fall into an exceptional case where some parameter or runtime situation may end in an exception. That is, exceptions mustn't be muted, but these must be avoided.

For example, if you know that some integer input could come with an invalid format, use int.TryParse instead of int.Parse. There're a lot of cases where you can do this instead of just saying "if it fails, simply throw an exception".

Throwing exceptions is expensive.

If, after all, an exception is thrown, instead of writing the exception to the log once it has been thrown, one of best practices is catching it in a first-chance exception handler. For example:

  • ASP.NET: Global.asax Application_Error
  • Others: AppDomain.FirstChanceException event.

My suggestion is local try/catches are better suited for handling special cases where you may translate an exception into another, or when you want to "mute" it for a very very very very very special case (a library bug throwing an unrelated exception that you need to mute in order to workaround the whole bug).

For the rest of the cases:

  • Try to avoid exceptions.
  • If this isn't possible: first-chance exception handlers.
  • Or use a PostSharp aspect (AOP).
share|improve this answer

The only time you should worry your users about something that happened in the code is if there is something they can or need to do to avoid the issue. If they can change data on a form, push a button or change a application setting in order to avoid the issue then let them know. But warnings or errors that the user has no ability to avoid just makes them lose confidence in your product.

Exceptions and Logs are for you, the developer, not your end user. Understanding the right thing to do when you catch each exception is far better than just applying some golden rule or rely on an application-wide safety net.

Mindless coding is the ONLY kind of wrong coding. The fact that you feel there is something better that can be done in those situations shows that you are invested in good coding, but avoid trying to stamp some generic rule in these situations and understand the reason for something to throw in the first place and what you can do to recover from it.

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Better approach is second one (the on in which you tell specifically exception type). The advantage of this you know that this type of exception can came in your code. You are handling this type of exception and you can resume. But if any other exception came that means something is wrong which will help you find bugs in your code. Application will eventually crash but you will come to know that something you missed (bug) which needs to be fixed.

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Leave blank catch block is the worse thing to do. If there is an error the best way to handle it is to:

  1. Log it into file\database etc..
  2. Try to fix it on the fly (maybe trying alternative way of doing that operation)
  3. If we cannot fix that, notify the user that there is some error and of course abort the operation
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Sometimes you need to treat exceptions, witch says nothing to users. My way is:

  • To catch uncaughted exceptions on application level (ie. in global.asax) for critical exceptions (application can not be useful). These exeptions I am not catching on the place. Just log them on app level and let system do its job.
  • Cath "on place" and show some useful info to user (entered wrong number, can't parse)
  • Catch on place and do nothing on marginal problems like "I will check for update info on the background, but the service is not running".

It definitely does not have to be best practice. ;-)

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To me, handling exception can be seen as business rule. Obviously, the first approach is unacceptable. The second one is better one and it might be 100% correct way IF the context says so. Now, for example, you are developing an Outlook Addin. If you addin throws unhandled exception, the outlook user might now know it since the outlook will not destroy itself because of one plugin failed. And you have hard time to figure out what went wrong. Therefore, the second approach in this case, to me, it is a correct one. Beside logging the exception, you might decide to display error message to user - i consider it as a business rule.

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Second approach is good one , if you dont want to show the error and confuse the user of application by showing runtime exception(i.e. error) which is not related to them , just log error and technical team look for the issue and resolve it

try
{
  //do some work
}
catch(Exception exception)
{
   WriteException2LogFile(exception);//it will write the or log the error in a text file
}

so i recommend that go for the second approach in whole application.

share|improve this answer
    
The second approach doesn't show the user than an error has occurred - for instance if they were saving something they wouldn't know that it has failed. catch blocks should always either call throw to bubble the exception on up or return something/display something that tells the user that the action has failed. You want to get the support call when they fail to save whatever it is, not 6 months later when they try to retrieve it and can't find it. –  Keith Feb 21 '13 at 8:51

With Exceptions i try the following:

First i caught special types of exceptions like division by zero, IO operations, and so on and write code according to that, for example a division by zero, depending the provenience of the values i could alert the user (example a simple calculator in that in a middle calculation (not the arguments) arrives in a division by zero) or to silently treat that exception, logging it and continue processing.

Then i try to catch the remaining exceptions and log them, and if possible allow the execution of code. If not alert the user that a error happened and ask them to mail a error report.

In code something like this

try{
    //Some code here
}
catch(DivideByZeroException dz){
    AlerUserDivideByZerohappened();
}
catch(Exception e){
    treatGeneralException(e);
}
finally{
    //if a IO operation here i close the hanging handlers for example
}
share|improve this answer
    
Divide by zero exceptions and the like are better dealt with by checking for a 0 numerator beforehand, rather than a try-catch. Also why catch the generic Exception here? You're better off letting the error bubble up than dealing with it here in all cases where you're not expecting it. –  Keith Feb 20 '13 at 14:47
    
Read better what i have written about the example i have given -- notice the "not in arguments". Of course any calculator should verify the given arguments. What i talked was about the middle-steps. At that point the user argument verification already happened. Also in some applications it's better to avoid exceptions to bubble up. Some apps should treat exceptions silently, where others should treat exceptions as errors. A web serverfor example should run even when exceptions occurs, where medical software (x-ray machines for example) should abort when exceptions occurs. –  Sorcerer86pt Feb 20 '13 at 16:35
    
No apps should ever treat exceptions silently. Occasionally you have an exception that the code can handle, but such usage should be both rare and specific to the expected exception. Your example of a web server is a poor one - it should have configuration settings that let you choose how errors are logged and whether they're displayed with detail or just an HTTP 500 page, but they should never silently ignore errors. –  Keith Feb 21 '13 at 8:46

The catch without any arguments is simply eating the exception and is of no use.What if a fatal error occurs.There's no way to know what happened if you use catch without argument.

A catch statement should catch more specific Exceptions like FileNotFoundException and then at the very end you should catch Exception which would catch any other exception and log them

share|improve this answer
    
Why have a general catch(Exception) at the end? If you're not expecting it then it's always best practice to pass it on up to the next layer. –  Keith Feb 20 '13 at 14:49
1  
@Keith yes you are right...there's no point in catching exceptions that you are not expecting but you can the general exception for logging purpose.. –  Anirudha Feb 20 '13 at 17:23

C# Exception handling uses the try, catch, and finally keywords to attempt actions that may not succeed, to handle failures, and to clean up resources afterwards.

  try
  {
      //your code here
  }
  Catch (exception type)
  {
      //if the exception occurred
      //your code here
  }
  finally
  {
      //your code here
  }

Examples and source code....C# Exception Handling

Tom

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Best practice is to throw an Exception when the error occurs. Because an error has occurred and it should not be hidden.

But in real life you can have several situations when you want to hide this

  1. You rely on third party component and you want to continue the program in case of error.
  2. You have a business case that you need to continue in case of error
share|improve this answer
2  
No. Do not throw Exception. Ever. Throw an appropriate subclass of Exception all you want, but never Exception because that gives absolutely no semantic information. I flat out cannot see a scenario where it makes sense to throw Exception but not a subclass thereof. –  Michael Kjörling Feb 20 '13 at 12:32

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