Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is what I am trying to do. I have written a short C code, which will open a file, read the first 2 bytes (2 characters) and compare it with a 2 character string. This is to help in identifying the file type (lets call the first 2 bytes the signature of the file).

Now, once I have read the 2 bytes from the file, I want to compare it with a predefined signature and based on that print the file type.

code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
FILE *fp;
char signature[2];

if(argc!=2)
{
printf("usage: fileio.c <filename>\n");
exit(1);
}

if((fp=fopen(argv[1],"r"))!=NULL)
{
fscanf(fp,"%c %c", &signature[0], &signature[1]);
printf("%x %x\n",signature[0],signature[1]);
}

}

if I run this for an executable file on Windows Platform, it will show the output as: 4a 5d, since it is the MZ signature.

now, I want to do something like this:

compare the 2 bytes of the signature array with, 0x4d5a, if they are equal then print that it is an executable.

the other way I thought was, compare it with the string, "MZ". but then I need to use fscanf to read the first 2 bytes from the file and store them in a string. Then compare it with the "MZ" signature.

It would be great if I can do it using hex bytes since I need to perform some operation on the hex bytes later.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
  FILE *fp;
  const char mz_sig[] =  {0x4d, 0x5a};
  char signature[2];

  fp=fopen(argv[1],"r");
  fscanf(fp,"%c %c", &signature[0], &signature[1]);
  printf("%x %x\n", signature[0], signature[1]);

  if (*(uint16_t*)signature == *(uint16_t*)mz_sig) {
    printf("match\n");
  }

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Could you show the complete example by relating it to the code I have posted. Reading 2 bytes and storing them in an array using fscanf. It would be great if you could post the complete code. –  Neon Flash Feb 20 '13 at 8:40
    
updated the answer –  perreal Feb 20 '13 at 11:57

To start with, you should probably open the file in binary mode ("rb").

As for the reading, you could use fread to read the two first bytes as a single uint16_t, and compare that.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.