Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have written copy constructor for the pointer data member for one of my class

class person
{
public:

 string name;
int number;
};



  class MyClass {
     int x;
    char c;
    std::string s;
    person student;
    MyClass::MyClass( const MyClass& other ) :
    x( other.x ), c( other.c ), s( other.s ),student(other.student){}
 };

but I am getting the following error when I run this program

error: extra qualification ‘MyClass::’ on member ‘MyClass’ [-fpermissive] am I properly using the copy constructor .

share|improve this question
1  
As the error message says, MyClass:: is unnecessary. –  jogojapan Feb 20 '13 at 6:45
    
(But only because you're defining the constructor inline in the class' body.) –  Frédéric Hamidi Feb 20 '13 at 6:45
    
You don't seem to have a pointer data member in either of the classes you've shown. Your copy ctor does member-wise copying. The one the compiler would generate does the same. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 20 '13 at 6:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
MyClass::MyClass( const MyClass& other )
^^^^^^^^^^

The fully qualified name is necessary only when you define the body outside the class definition. It tells the compiler that this particular function(which happens to be the constructor in your case) belongs to the name qualified class.
When you define the body within the class definition it is implied that the function is an member of the class in which you are defining it so fully qualified name is not needed.

share|improve this answer
class person
{
public:

string name;
int number;
};

 class MyClass {
 int x;
 char c;
 std::string s;
 person *student;
 MyClass(const MyClass& other);
};

MyClass::MyClass( const MyClass& other ) :
 x( other.x ), c( other.c ), s( other.s ),student(other.student){
  x = other.x;
  c = other.c;
  s = other.s;
  student = other.student;
 }

It compiles fine now . still I have one doubt that , am I properly doing the an explicit copy constructor and assignment operations.?

share|improve this answer
    
No for student because it is a pointer and you are assigning it to the copy's student. Unless that is the behavior you want (i.e. all MyClass instances point to the same copy of student), you need to write a person constructor that handles copying of its members. –  Barney Feb 20 '13 at 10:01
    
Also, you don't need to re-assign the members again in the constructor body. –  Barney Feb 20 '13 at 10:20

If you want shallow copy, (all MyClass instances point to the same copy of student), do this:

MyClass::MyClass( const MyClass& other ) :
    x( other.x ), c( other.c ), s( other.s ), student( other.student ) {}

Otherwise, you want deep copy, which is implemented this way (note the de-reference):

MyClass::MyClass( const MyClass& other ) :
    x( other.x ), c( other.c ), s( other.s ) {
    student = new person(*(other.student)); // de-reference is required
}

Run the following code to see the difference:

MyClass a;
person mike;
mike.name = "Mike Ross";
mike.number = 26;
a.student = &mike;
MyClass b(a);
b.student->number = 52;
cout << a.student->number << endl;
cout << b.student->number << endl;

Shallow copy output:

52
52

Deep copy output:

26
52
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.