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I'm working through an assignment with Pandas and am using np.where() to create add a column to a Pandas DataFrame with three possible values:

fips_df['geog_type'] = np.where(fips_df.fips.str[-3:] != '000', 'county', np.where(fips_df.fips.str[:] == '00000', 'country', 'state'))

The state of the DataFrame after adding the column is like this:

print fips_df[:5]

    fips         geog_entity fips_prefix geog_type
0  00000       UNITED STATES          00   country
1  01000             ALABAMA          01     state
2  01001  Autauga County, AL          01    county
3  01003  Baldwin County, AL          01    county
4  01005  Barbour County, AL          01    county

This column construction is tested by two asserts. The first passes and the second fails.

## check the numbers of geog_type

assert set(fips_df['geog_type'].value_counts().iteritems()) == set([('state', 51), ('country', 1), ('county', 3143)])

assert set(fips_df.geog_type.value_counts().iteritems()) == set([('state', 51), ('country', 1), ('county', 3143)])

What is the difference between calling columns as fips_df.geog_type and fips_df['geog_type'] that causes my second assert to fail?

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2 Answers 2

Just in case, you can create a new column with much less effort. E.g.:

In [1]: import pandas as pd

In [2]: import numpy as np

In [3]: df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.uniform(size=10))

In [4]: df
Out[4]: 
          0
0  0.366489
1  0.697744
2  0.570066
3  0.756647
4  0.036149
5  0.817588
6  0.884244
7  0.741609
8  0.628303
9  0.642807

In [5]: categorize = lambda value: "ABC"[int(value > 0.3) + int(value > 0.6)]

In [6]: df["new_col"] = df[0].apply(categorize)

In [7]: df
Out[7]: 
          0 new_col
0  0.366489       B
1  0.697744       C
2  0.570066       B
3  0.756647       C
4  0.036149       A
5  0.817588       C
6  0.884244       C
7  0.741609       C
8  0.628303       C
9  0.642807       C
share|improve this answer
    
This is definitely a nicer way to do the actual calculation, note int isn't needed :) –  Andy Hayden Feb 20 '13 at 14:28
    
@AndyHayden true, int sneaked in while debugging. –  Maxim Egorushkin Feb 20 '13 at 15:00
    
Thanks for suggesting an alternative @MaximYegorushkin! My new column fips['geog_type'] is created based on a string of numbers where the pattern of the numbers allows categorization, but not the numerical value, so I'm not sure if your method would work with strings. I've edited my question and inserted an output from the DataFrame after the new column is created. –  ajrenold Feb 20 '13 at 17:59
    
@ajrenold categorize function above accepts a value (whatever it is in the column) and returns its category (again of any type, most often people use either a string or number as category). So you can modify it to accept strings. –  Maxim Egorushkin Feb 20 '13 at 19:09
    
@ajrenold something like categorize = lambda value: 'county' if value[-3:] != '000' else ('country' if value = '00000' else 'state') –  Maxim Egorushkin Feb 20 '13 at 19:16

It should be the same (and will be most of the time)...

One situation it's not is when you already have an attribute or method set with that value (in which case it won't be overridden and hence the column won't be accessible with dot notation):

In [1]: df = pd.DataFrame([[1, 2] ,[3 ,4]])

In [2]: df.A = 7

In [3]: df.B = lambda: 42

In [4]: df.columns = list('AB')

In [5]: df.A
Out[5]: 7

In [6]: df.B()
Out[6]: 42

In [7]: df['A']
Out[7]: 
0    1
1    3
Name: A

Interestingly, dot notation for accessing columns isn't mentioned in the selection syntax.

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1  
    
Thanks! @andyhayden. I thought that both column access methods were valid, though I had not seen that part of Pandas documentation. Maybe the problem is coming from the assert statement –  ajrenold Feb 20 '13 at 18:16
    
@ajrenold me too tbh, this is the only way I can think of, it could be worth trying to assert df.A == df['A'] ? –  Andy Hayden Feb 20 '13 at 18:42

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