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I have being working for a while in javascript and usually do something like this just to cache the value of properties of functions that are declared inside a deep structure or "namespace"

//global scope
(function ($, lib) {
  //function scope 1
  var format = lib.format, // instead of calling lib.format all the time just call format
    touch = lib.pointer.touch, //instead of calling lib.pointer.touch each time just touch
    $doc = $(document),
    log = logger.log; //not console log...


  $doc.on('app:ready', function () {
    //function scope 2
    $doc.on('some:event', function (e) {
      //function scope 3
      //use the cached variables
      log(format('{0} was triggered on the $doc object', e.type);
    });

    $doc.on(touch, function (e) {
      //function scope 3
      log(format('this should be {1} and is... {0} ', e.type, touch);
    });
  }); 
}(jQuery, lib));

I was doing that because:

  • as lazy as I am, writing touch seem more appealing that writing lib.pointer.touch, even when powerful IDEs with fancy autocompletion could help on this, touch is shorter.
  • a minimizer could convert that single private variable to a single letter variable, so it also made sense for me (I know, I know, never optimize too soon, but this seems to be safe I guess)

All the code written that way seems to perform decently on mobile devices and desktop browsers, so It seems to be a safe practice (In "the practice", pun intended). But I since this relies in closures, and inner functions have to create a closure to save the context it was declared I was wondering...

  • if a function does not uses variables from the outside context (free variables)... is the closure context still saved? (or if i a tree falls in the wood and nobody is there to hear it, does it still make the crash sound? hehe) I'm aware that this could vary between javascript engines, because ECMA mention nothing about if it is required to save the context or not when variables from the outside are not accessed.

  • if the above expression is true... will this block of code be more efficient?

    //global scope
    (function ($, lib) {
      //function scope 1
      var format = lib.format,
        touch = lib.pointer.touch,
        $doc = $(document),
        log = console.log;
    
      $doc.on('app:ready', function () {
    
        (function ($doc, touch, lib, format) {
          // since all the variables are provided as arguments in this function
          // there is no need to save them to the [[scope]] of this function
          // because they are local to this self invoking function now
          $doc.on('some:event', function (e) {
            //function scope 3
            //use the cached variables
            log(format('{0} was triggered on the $doc object', e.type);
          });
    
          $doc.on(touch, function (e) {
            //function scope 3
            log(format('this should be {1} and is... {0} ', e.type, touch);
          });
        }($doc, touch, lib, format));      
    
      }); 
    
    }(jQuery, lib));
    

Is it more efficient because it passes those variables to self immediate invoking function? will the cost of creating that new function any impact in the code, (negative or positive)?

  • How I can properly measure the memory consumption of my javascript library in a reliable way? I have 100x little javascript modules all inside immediate self invoking functions mostly to avoid variables from leaking to the global context. So They all are wrapped in modules very similar to the block of code mentioned above.

  • will it have a better effect to cache the variables closer, even when that will mean I will have to repeat the declarations of the variables closer to where they're going to be used?

  • I have the feeling that looking for a variable not in the current local context, the engine will first look into the parent scope and iterate over all the variables at that level... the more variables per level, worse would probably be the performance looking for a variable.

  • try to find an undefined variable from the internal closures will be the most expensive, because by definition the variable will be first search on the parent scope until the global scope, and not finding it will force the engine to finally reach the global scope. Is that true? are engines optimizing this kind of lookups?

In the end... I know that I will not want to implement my code as the second example mostly because It will make the code harder to read and I'm kinda confortable with the minimized size of the final output using the first approach. My question is motivated by the curiosity and to try to understand a bit better this really nice feature of javascript.

Accordingly to this test...

http://jsperf.com/closures-js

It seems the second approach is faster. But is only evident when iterating an insane number of times... Right now my code does not do that number of iterations... but probably is consuming more memory because of my way of coding...

update: it has being pointed to me that this question is too large. I'm sorry will try to break in small parts. This question was motivated mostly by curiosity as I said, performance seems negligible even in mobile devices. Thank you for all your feedback.

share|improve this question
    
I've not a detailed answer for you, but I've found this some days ago. developer.nokia.com/Community/Wiki/… –  chumkiu Feb 20 '13 at 8:48
3  
That's a very long question, you might should split it up. –  Bergi Feb 20 '13 at 9:03
1  
$doc = $doc,? –  Juan Mendes Feb 20 '13 at 18:18
3  
Chrome does optimize the closures, you can verify this through the debugger, you won't be able to see values of variables that weren't actually used inside the closure. But yes, your question is too many questions, each post should be a single question, that makes it as useful as possible to other users. –  Juan Mendes Feb 20 '13 at 18:22
2  
The key phrases are "It will make the code harder to read" and "is only evident when iterating an insane number of times". You have to decide for yourself if sacrificing readability is worth the gain of microseconds. –  Dennis Feb 20 '13 at 19:13

1 Answer 1

I think it is premature optimization. You already know performance is not a problem in most cases. Even in tight loops, performance does not degrade that bad. Let the JavaScript engine optimize this on its own as Chrome has started doing, by removing unneeded variables from closures.

One important thing is, don't make your code harder to read with unnecessary optimization. Your example takes quite a bit more code, hampering developmen. In some cases, we are forced to make the code harder to read because we know a particular piece of the app is more memory/performance intensive, but only at that point should we do that.

If you add a breakpoint to the following code (in Chrome), you'll see that the world variable has been optimized out of the closure, look at the 'Closure' node under the Scope Variables http://jsfiddle.net/4J6JP/1/

enter image description here.

(function(){
   var hello = "hello", world="world";
    setTimeout(function(){
        debugger;
        console.log(hello);
    });
})()

Note that if you add an eval in that inner function, then all bets are off and the closure can't be optimized.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks man, so as a conclusion for you at least it make no much sense to care about the performance of closures unless they become really an issue right? And browsers seem to be making a good job optimizing the closures. So having 100+ modules inside self invoking functions shouldn't be an issue right? –  roy riojas Feb 20 '13 at 21:54
1  
At whatever number, I don't think the change is noticeable. Stick to what's easiest to read until you find it's a problem. It will only be noticeable when you are dealing with a section of code that is particularly memory or performance intensive –  Juan Mendes Feb 20 '13 at 22:20

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