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I am trying to understand a piece of code in order to refactor it. There are several verifications for the input value to check if they are valid, and on each verification there is a line of code that I do not understand what it does.Here is the code:

if (IsNotDouble(weight))
{
     MessageBox.Show("Weight must be a numeric value!");
     txtWeight.Select();
     return;
}

txtWeight is a textbox.

Can anyone tell me what txtWeight.Select() does here.I can not understand why this piece of code should be posted here after each time an error is thrown.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It sets the cursor into the textbox where you have to enter the weight.

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According to the MSDN:

The Select method activates the control if the control's Selectable style bit is set to true in ControlStyles.

It means, that Select sets focus to the Control so in your scenario if IsNotDouble(weight) is true, you set focus to txtWeight so that user can write there a text immediately without seeking the txtWeight through the entire form.

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Select method activates the textbox control or you can think this as bringing the focus to the textbox. It may not be required in your case as when the verification is happpening most probably the focus is already on that textbox

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The TextBox.Select() method from MSDN.

Activates the control. The Select method activates the control if the control's Selectable style bit is set to true in ControlStyles, it is contained in another control, and all its parent controls are both visible and enabled.

In your case, it seems whenever a validation check has failed, the particular text box is selected to activate it in order to set the visual focus to it.

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