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I am a skilled C/C++ programmer who must implement a firefox extension in javascript (a language that is EXCEEDINGLY unpleasant and non-intuitive for me). I have the extension basics working, but now I need to put all my global variables and functions into a single namespace to assure none of my variable names or function names conflict with names that might exist in any past/present/future global/window object, or in another extension.

To create a namespace object with my global variables seems easy and straightforward enough, and works.

What I can't understand is how to put declarations for my functions into the namespace object, and then implement all those functions below the namespace object declaration. Can this be done with some reasonably clean syntax... something like the following?

//
// declare namespace
//
var mynamespace = {
  varname00: value,
  varname01: value,
  varname02: value,
  function: funcname00(),
  function: funcname01(number),
  function: funcname02(number, string),
};
//
// define functions
//
mynamespace.funcname00() {
  return (23);
}

mynamespace.funcname01(number) {
  return (number * number);
}

mynamespace.funcname02(number, string) {
  econsole.logStringMessage("funcname02() : " + string + number);
  return (number);
}

NOTE: My goal is NOT to be tricky or advanced --- precisely the opposite! I'm looking for a technique that makes as much intuitive sense to a C programmer as possible! Therefore I prefer to:

1: create a small declaration of the namespace object at the top that only declares variables and functions.

2: implement the functions outside the global namespace object.

Being completely confused by javascript syntax rules, I'm guessing javascript would probably let me insert all the function definitions/implementations inside the namespace object declaration. That's gross and ugly to me, but if that's the only way that works, I'll have to live with that. But it is extremely gross (to me personally) to have a block so huge it includes "everything", so I'd rather avoid that if possible.

NOTE: This is NOT a solicitation for opinions about program style - exactly the opposite. I just want to know what is in fact the javascript syntax that most closely matches the conventional C syntax/layout that I showed in my example above. I am open to comments about execution efficiency if the javascript syntax/layout closest to my example is somehow slow, inefficient, or functionally problematic. Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
There is no such concept as function prototypes in Javascript. Functions are declared and implemented at the same time. You could initially set some properties to null in your workspace and assign functions to them later, but the semantics would still be different. –  Frédéric Hamidi Feb 20 '13 at 8:55
1  
a) JS needs no type signature declarations, and no namespace declarations b) "namespaces" are just objects with properties, and you will need to assign the functions to it (or define them right in the object literal). –  Bergi Feb 20 '13 at 8:57
    
From both your comments above, though formally javascript has no "function prototype or declaration", some workable syntax exists that would sorta mirror my example. Is that correct? What does the syntax look like? –  honestann Feb 20 '13 at 9:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The syntax closest to what you want to achieve would be to initialize function members to null in your namespace object:

var mynamespace = {
    varname00: value,
    varname01: value,
    varname02: value,
    funcname00: null,
    funcname01: null,
    funcname02: null
};

Then assign function expressions to these members, for instance:

mynamespace.funcname02 = function(num, str) {
    econsole.logStringMessage("funcname02() : " + str + num);
    return num;
};

Keep in mind that these functions will not be hoisted, which means they cannot be called by code lying between the namespace declaration and their implementation.

It's common style in Javascript to define the function directly in the namespace:

var mynamespace = {
    varname00: value,
    varname01: value,
    varname02: value,
    funcname02: function(num, str) {
        econsole.logStringMessage("funcname02() : " + str + num);
        return num;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's what I was looking for. Though the first way is more intuitive for me, I recognize the benefit of the common style you show. Maybe I can tolerate having everything in my javascript program inside my unique namespace object (if the extra intention doesn't drive me nuts). Question: Can the variables be accessed directly (as "varname00" versus "mynamespace.varname00") in either formulation? –  honestann Feb 20 '13 at 9:27
    
@honestann, nope, you will have to use their qualified names, unless you use the with statement, which is not recommended (and not available in strict mode). –  Frédéric Hamidi Feb 20 '13 at 9:31

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