Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This:

    UILable *myLabel = [[UILabel alloc] init];
    UILable *myLabel = [[UILabel alloc] init];

gives me a redefinition error.

But this:

    for(i=0;i<5;i++)
    { 
       UILable *myLabel = [[UILabel alloc] init];
       // some label code here
       [self.view addSubview:myLabel];
       [myLabel release];
    }

doesn't. So is the second one false? Should I define it before and just reuse it?

Is that right:

 UIIMageView *Sign;
//Some Sign Stuff
     Sign = [[UIImageView alloc]init];
        Sign.image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"Minus.png"];	
        frame = CGRectMake(160 ,80, 64, 64);
        Sign.frame = frame;
        [scrollView addSubview:Sign];
        Sign = nil;
        [Sign release];
//Some other Sign stuff
     Sign = [[UIImageView alloc]init];
        Sign.image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"Plus.png"];	
        frame = CGRectMake(200 ,80, 64, 64);
        Sign.frame = frame;
        [scrollView addSubview:Sign];
        Sign = nil;
        [Sign release];

is that correct? That doesnt work without the Sign = nil. So it seems a little wobbly too.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You cannot have identical variable names used in the same block level scope. So in your first example you cannot have a variable definition with the same name, you have to name them differently.

- (void) method {
   UIImageView* image1;

   // here we define a new block scope. This can be a block of any kind (while, for, if)
   {
      // All reference in this block to this variable will see this definition.
      UIImageView* image1;

      // Using image1 here
   }

   // Here we see again the image1 defined at the beginning of the method.
}

In your loop example you are in a new scope that it's reinitialize after each iteration.

Your third example is correct in that it define the variable only one time. You reuse this variable after that to assign a new object. The third one is less elegant in that your variable name does not describe well for each case what are their purpose.

For your case of 'Sign = nil' this effectively make the line that follows useless since in Objective-C a message sent to a nil object is ignored.

I would suggest to define a method that you can call to create your images that look the same. Something like:

- (void) createImage:(NSString*) image frame:(CGRect) frame {
  UIImageView *Sign;
  Sign = [[UIImageView alloc]init];
  Sign.image = [UIImage imageNamed:image]; 
  Sign.frame = frame;
  [self.scrollView addSubview:Sign];
  [Sign release];
}
share|improve this answer

Your for-loop is perfectly fine. The scope of myLabel is limited to one run of your for-loop. So each run a new variable to hold the reference to your UILabel is created.

The second code you posted has leaks.

Sign = nil
[Sign release]

This will release the object at address nil and not the object you created. I can't see what else is wrong with your code, but your fix is definitely not fixing the root cause. Maybe it will help to post what error/warning you get when removing Sign = nil.

Also note that starting your variable names with a capital letter is not a good naming convention, because usually class names start with one.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.