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I have a data frame that looks something like the following:

X Y
1 3
1 7
1 9
2 12
2 4
2 8 
3 11
3 3
3 5

I'd like to create a new variable Z that = 0.25 if X = 1, 0.75 if X = 2 and 0.95 if X = 3.

I've tried the following code, which creates a variable Z and then loops over X, checking to see if X is a certain value, and then sets Z to the corresponding correct value. For example:

data$Z <- 0
for (i in 1:length(data$X)){
   if (data$X[i]==1) {data$Z <- 0.25)
   if (data$X[i]==2) {data$Z <- 0.50)
   if (data$X[i]==2) {data$Z <- 0.95)
}

The problem is that for some reason the conditional trigger isn't getting tripped in this code. If I just run it with the first if statement, all of the Z's are set to 0.25. With just the first two, they're all 0.50, etc.

Any clue as to what's happening?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In this simple example, the easiest way would be to use subsetting:

data$Z <- 0.25
data$Z[data$X==2] <- 0.50
data$Z[data$X==3] <- 0.95

No need for any loops or if/else statements.

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1  
I don't see how this would be "better". It saves a few characters in the code, ... –  Roland Feb 20 '13 at 9:40

All these answers so far assume that you've only 3 values (and rightly so, there is no reason to assume otherwise).

However, assuming that you might have more than 3 values, you can use merge in that case as so:

# assuming this is your data (dummy)
set.seed(45)
df <- data.frame(x=rep(1:5, each=5), y=sample(25))

Here, you've five unique values for x. You can create a data.frame with the values you want to generate an additional column for each value of X as:

# here for each unique x, there is a value (just for example, randomly generated)
# equivalent to 0.25, 0.5 and 0.95 in your case
key <- data.frame(x=1:5, val=runif(5))

Now, you can use merge as:

merge(df, key, by="x", all=T)
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Use ifelse here beacause it is vectorized:

transform(dat, Z=ifelse(X==1,0.25,ifelse(X==2,0.75,0.95)))
 X  Y    Z
1 1  3 0.25
2 1  7 0.25
3 1  9 0.25
4 2 12 0.75
5 2  4 0.75
6 2  8 0.75
7 3 11 0.95
8 3  3 0.95
9 3  5 0.95

PS: here I assume that X take only 3 values.

EDIT

I like using sql case for such manipulations. You keep clear the business logic and it is fast as a vectorize version( intuitions)

library(sqldf)
dat$newX <- sqldf('SELECT CASE X 
       WHEN 1  THEN 0.25
       WHEN 2 THEN 0.5
       ELSE 0.95
       END AS newX
      FROM dat ')
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You need to set Z to the value you want at the same indexes where x meets those conditions, so:

data$Z <- 0
for (i in 1:length(data$X)){
   if (data$X[i]==1) {data$Z[i] <- 0.25)
   if (data$X[i]==2) {data$Z[i] <- 0.50)
   if (data$X[i]==3) {data$Z[i] <- 0.95)
}
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Who has two thumbs and feels dumb? This guy. –  Fomite Feb 20 '13 at 9:35
    
@EpiGrad This is the least idiomatic answer. Learn to use vectorized functions instead of for loops. Your code will run much faster that way. –  Roland Feb 20 '13 at 9:42
    
Yeah, I don't fully understand the R community's general hatred for for loops, but I do tend to think that things like ifelse are better for these cases, I was mostly just correcting the specific flaw in OP's original code. –  Marius Feb 20 '13 at 9:45
1  
There is no general hatred, but this loop is extremely inefficient. But I see your point of correcting the specific flaw and that's why I didn't downvote. –  Roland Feb 20 '13 at 9:47
    
@Roland In this case, because of the specific problem I'm dealing with, the speed gained by vectorization is not work the time it will take laying out something like ifelse appropriately. Here is one place where I'm not willing to sacrifice clarity for speed measured in tiny units. –  Fomite Feb 20 '13 at 9:48

It works with just one ifelse command:

transform(dat, Z = ifelse(X == 3, 0.95, 0.25 + 0.5 * (X - 1)))

  X  Y    Z
1 1  3 0.25
2 1  7 0.25
3 1  9 0.25
4 2 12 0.75
5 2  4 0.75
6 2  8 0.75
7 3 11 0.95
8 3  3 0.95
9 3  5 0.95

It even works without any ifelse (thanks to mathematics):

transform(dat, Z = 0.25 + round(0.50 * (X - 1) ^ .48, 2))

  X  Y    Z
1 1  3 0.25
2 1  7 0.25
3 1  9 0.25
4 2 12 0.75
5 2  4 0.75
6 2  8 0.75
7 3 11 0.95
8 3  3 0.95
9 3  5 0.95
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1  
+1! I like the X-1 trick ! even we loose the logic (we hide the business rule)! –  agstudy Feb 20 '13 at 9:46
    
nice trick, but too specific. –  Arun Feb 20 '13 at 10:30

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