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This question comes close to what I need, but my scenario is slightly different. The source table and destination table are the same and the primary key is a uniqueidentifier (guid). When I try this:

insert into MyTable
    select * from MyTable where uniqueId = @Id;

I obviously get a primary key constraint violation, since I'm attempting to copy over the primary key. Actually, I don't want to copy over the primary key at all. Rather, I want to create a new one. Additionally, I would like to selectively copy over certain fields, and leave the others null. To make matters more complex, I need to take the primary key of the original record, and insert it into another field in the copy (PreviousId field).

I'm sure there is an easy solution to this, I just don't know enough TSQL to know what it is.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 79 down vote accepted

Try this:


insert into MyTable(field1, field2, id_backup)
    select field1, field2, uniqueId from MyTable where uniqueId = @Id;

Any fields not specified should receive their default value (which is usually NULL when not defined).

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Awesome. Worked like a charm. It was so obvious once you wrote it out. Thanks!! –  Kilhoffer Sep 29 '08 at 17:42

Ok, I know that it's an old issue but I post my answer anyway.

I like this solution. I only have to specify the identity column(s).

SELECT * INTO TempTable FROM MyTable_T WHERE id = 1;
ALTER TABLE TempTable DROP COLUMN id;
INSERT INTO MyTable_T SELECT * FROM TempTable;
DROP TABLE TempTable;

The "id"-column is the identity column and that's the only column I have to specify. It's better than the other way around anyway. :-)

I use SQL Server. You may want to use "CREATE TABLE" and "UPDATE TABLE" at row 1 and 2. Hmm, I saw that I did not really give the answer that he wanted. He wanted to copy the id to another column also. But this solution is nice for making a copy with a new auto-id.

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This is tricky, how can you be sure you are copying the correct id to the correct row during the INSERT INTO in line 3? –  Erno de Weerd Feb 22 '13 at 13:47
    
The id-column is an identity column (in my table) so I don't care about the value. I just want a new record holding the same values as the "old" one. –  Jonas Feb 22 '13 at 14:26
    
id = 1 on the first row is just an example. –  Jonas Apr 24 '13 at 9:49
1  
+1 for not having to list all the columns –  RustyH Jan 17 at 14:13
    
THis works great! I was not using an SQL account that had enough security so I had to use a schema and give select permission to the schema in order to execute the select * from TempTable –  Jaydel Gluckie Aug 12 at 22:42

Specify all fields but your ID field.

INSERT INTO MyTable (FIELD2, FIELD3, ..., FIELD529, PreviousId)
SELECT FIELD2, NULL, ..., FIELD529, FIELD1
FROM MyTable
WHERE FIELD1 = @Id;
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I'm guessing you're trying to avoid writing out all the column names. If you're using SQL Management Studio you can easily right click on the table and Script As Insert.. then you can mess around with that output to create your query.

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insert into MyTable (uniqueId, column1, column2, referencedUniqueId)
select NewGuid(), // don't know this syntax, sorry
  column1,
  column2,
  uniqueId,
from MyTable where uniqueId = @Id
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If "key" is your PK field and it's autonumeric.

insert into MyTable (field1, field2, field3, parentkey)
select field1, field2, null, key from MyTable where uniqueId = @Id

it will generate a new record, copying field1 and field2 from the original record

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You can do like this:

INSERT INTO DENI/FRIEN01P 
SELECT 
   RCRDID+112,
   PROFESION,
   NAME,
   SURNAME,
   AGE, 
   RCRDTYP, 
   RCRDLCU, 
   RCRDLCT, 
   RCRDLCD 
FROM 
   FRIEN01P      

There instead of 112 you should put a number of the maximum id in table DENI/FRIEN01P.

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My table has 100 fields, and I needed a query to just work. Now I can switch out any number of fields with some basic conditional logic and not worry about its ordinal position.

  1. Replace the below table name with your table name

    SQLcolums = "SELECT COLUMN_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS WHERE (TABLE_NAME = 'TABLE-NAME')"
    
    Set GetColumns = Conn.Execute(SQLcolums)
    Do WHILE not GetColumns.eof
    
    colName = GetColumns("COLUMN_NAME")
    
  2. Replace the original identity field name with your PK field name

    IF colName = "ORIGINAL-IDENTITY-FIELD-NAME" THEN ' ASSUMING THAT YOUR PRIMARY KEY IS THE FIRST FIELD DONT WORRY ABOUT COMMAS AND SPACES
        columnListSOURCE = colName 
        columnListTARGET = "[PreviousId field name]"
    ELSE
        columnListSOURCE = columnListSOURCE & colName
        columnListTARGET = columnListTARGET & colName
    END IF
    
    GetColumns.movenext
    
    loop
    
    GetColumns.close    
    
  3. Replace the table names again (both target table name and source table name); edit your where conditions

    SQL = "INSERT INTO TARGET-TABLE-NAME (" & columnListTARGET & ") SELECT " & columnListSOURCE & " FROM SOURCE-TABLE-NAME WHERE (FIELDNAME = FIELDVALUE)" 
    Conn.Execute(SQL)
    
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protected by acdcjunior Jun 3 at 21:09

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