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I only know of one instance using registers is via CtrlR* whereby I paste text from a clipboard.

What are other uses of registers? How to use them?

Everything you know about VI registers (let's focus on vi 7.2) -- share with us.

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9  
I gave a long answer there on the use of registers –  Benoit Oct 22 '11 at 5:39

14 Answers 14

up vote 498 down vote accepted

Registers in Vim let you run actions or commands on text stored within them. To access a register, you type "a before a command, where a is the name of a register. If you want to copy the current line into register k, you can type

"kyy

Or you can append to a register by using a capital letter

"Kyy

You can then move through the document and paste it elsewhere using

"kp

To access all currently defined registers type

:reg

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78  
And "+ is a special register that refers to the system clipboard. –  Aaron McDaid Feb 12 '13 at 22:54
8  
In Windows, the Clipboard can be accessed with "*; so the command to copy till end of file becomes "*yG. –  aditya menon Mar 14 '13 at 11:35
22  
In X (Linux, possibly also OS-X), * is the "mouse highlight" clipboard, and + is the Ctrl-XCV clipboard. –  dotancohen Jun 13 '13 at 5:49
5  
Is there a way to append to the clipboard register (since there's no capital +)? –  naitsirhc Aug 13 '13 at 15:30
1  
@dotancohen Technically it's called PRIMARY selection, but I guess "mouse higlight" is easier for people to get :) –  kyrias Nov 26 '13 at 16:45

I was pleased when I discovered the 0 register. If you yank text without assigning it to a particular register, then it will be assigned to the 0 register, as well as being saved in the default " register. The difference between the 0 and " registers is that 0 is only populated with yanked text, whereas the default register is also populated with text deleted using d/D/x/X/c/C/s/S commands.

I find this useful when I want to copy some text, delete something and replace it with the copied text. The following steps illustrate an example:

  • Yank the text you want to copy with y[motion] - this text is saved in " and 0 registers
  • Delete the text you want to replace with d[motion] - this text is saved in " register
  • Paste the yanked text with "0p

On the final step, if you were to paste from the default register (with p), it would use the text that you had just deleted (probably not what you intended).

For more info see :help registers.

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11  
p or P pastes from the default register. The longhand equivalent would be ""p (or ""P). –  nelstrom Oct 2 '09 at 9:08
97  
By the way, the same way "0 holds the last yank, "1 holds the last delete or change. –  FireAphis Jun 2 '11 at 15:02
4  
" is the command to use a register for the next command. So ""p would use the " register for the paste command and "0p would use the 0 register. –  Ramon Marco Navarro Aug 18 '11 at 9:33
3  
0p would mean go to the first character of the current line and paste from the contents of the default register ("). "p would be an incomplete command since you need to specify what command to use the register p for. –  Ramon Marco Navarro Aug 18 '11 at 9:35
3  
I wish I can vote this up a million times. –  Haralan Dobrev Feb 25 '13 at 22:59

One of my favorite parts about registers is using them as macros!

Let's say you are dealing with a tab-delimited value file as such:

    ID  Df  %Dev    Lambda
    1   0   0.000000    0.313682
    2   1   0.023113    0.304332
    3   1   0.044869    0.295261
    4   1   0.065347    0.286460
    5   1   0.084623    0.277922
    6   1   0.102767    0.269638
    7   1   0.119845    0.261601

Now you decide that you need to add a percentage sign at the end of the %Dev field. We'll make a simple macro in the (arbitrarily selected) m register as follows:

  1. qm

  2. EE: Go to the end of the 3rd column.

  3. a: Insert mode to append to the end of this column.

  4. %: Type the percent sign we want to add.

  5. <ESC>: Get back into command mode.

  6. j0: Go to beginning of next line.

  7. q: Stop recording macro

We can now just type @m to run this macro on the current line. Furthermore, we can type 100@m to do this 100 times! Life's looking pretty good.

At this point you should be saying, "BUT WAIT, WHAT THE HECK DOES THIS HAVE TO DO WITH REGISTERS?"

Excellent point. Let's investigate what is in the contents of the m register by typing "mp. We then get the following:

    EEa%<ESC>j0

At first this looks like you accidentally opened a binary file in notepad, but upon second glance, it's the exact sequence of characters in our macro!

You are a curious person, so let's do something interesting and edit this line of text to insert a "!" instead of boring old "%".

    EEa!<ESC>j0

Then let's yank this into the n register by typing B"nyE. Then, just for kicks, let's run the n macro on a line of our data using @n....

OMG, IT ADDED A "!"

Essentially, running a macro is like pressing the exact sequence of keys in that macro's register. If that isn't a cool register trick, I'll eat my hat.

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26  
This is totally key. I haven't noticed until now that registers are the same as macro buffers. This means you can just store all your macros in text, yank them, and run them. Pretty cool, and a little bit weird. Very Vim. –  naught101 Apr 11 '12 at 6:35
6  
good siR i believe that is a cookie in your beard –  James Andino Jun 16 '12 at 18:40
8  
By the way, I like the explanation, but, assuming this is a fixed width file, you can easily add the "%" sign at the end of that column by doing a C-V, G, A, %, ESC. This will do a vertical selection and append the percent sign. –  thebitguru Nov 7 '12 at 6:54
1  
you could do :1,$normal EEa% as well. –  kioopi Feb 12 '13 at 20:02
    
oh so this is why when i record macros and registers on the same key, things get messed up... –  Justin L. Apr 23 '13 at 22:45

Other useful registers:

"* or "+ - the contents of the system clipboard

"/ - last search command

": - last command.

Note with vim macros, you can edit them, since they are just a list of the keystrokes used when recording the macro. So you can write to a text file the macro (using "ap to write macro a) and edit them, and load them into a register with "ay$. Nice way of storing useful macros.

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2  
Default vim on OSX doesn't include "* integration. You can install a version from homebrew-alt that does. Check with vim --version - -clipboard means you don't have it, +clipboard means you do. –  Xavier Shay Aug 11 '11 at 7:26
12  
In X11, "* and "+ are even cooler: "+ pastes the last text copied with ctrl+c (copy buffer), or what ever shortcut you use (or right-click>copy). "* pastes the last text highlighted with the mouse (selection buffer). So if you copy something with ctrl+c, and then highlight something else with the mouse, you can choose which one to paste. This doesn't work in Windows, where these two registers are synonymous. –  naught101 Apr 11 '12 at 6:30
1  
Bless you, I've been looking for "* and "+ for years! I thought only gvim had access to the system clipboards, but apparently regular vim does too! –  Tarrasch Aug 29 '12 at 14:42
    
@Tarrasch If you use the console vim instead of gvim you'll discover alot more things. I think. visit #vim on freenode too! –  trusktr Oct 5 '13 at 23:40
    
How to enable if one has -xterm_clipboard on vim --version. Any simple package to install? (debian/apt-get). Thanks. –  Dr Beco Aug 24 at 22:30

The black hole register _ is the /dev/null of registers.

I use it in my vimrc to allow deleting single characters without updating the default register:

noremap x "_x

and to paste in visual mode without updating the default register:

vnoremap p "_dP
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1  
How is this register's behavior different from any other's? –  Philip Aug 11 '11 at 4:14
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@Philip, Its content is always empty. –  strager Aug 11 '11 at 5:43
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Came here looking for this. This remapping is perfect for when you want to copy some text, delete some text and then paste the original text (using x). –  eremzeit Sep 3 '11 at 19:32
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the mapping for x gets less convenient to transpose chars. –  skeept Oct 5 '11 at 19:43
1  
vnoremap p "_c<Esc>p is better - using d becomes problematic if you're selecting at the end of the line. –  chibicode Nov 27 '11 at 22:37

I think the secret guru register is the expression = register. It can be used for creative macro mappings.

:inoremap  \d The current date <c-r>=system("date")<cr>

You can use it in conjunction with your system as above or get responses from custom VimL functions etc.

or just ad hoc stuff like

<c-r>=35+7<cr>
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1  
Check out Derek Wyatt's [video on using the expression register](derekwyatt.org/vim/vim-tutorial-videos/… ) –  Jeromy Anglim Jan 31 '11 at 5:14

If you ever want to paste the contents of the register in an ex-mode command, hit <C-r><registerletter>.

Why would you use this? I wanted to do a search and replace for a longish string, so I selected it in visual mode, started typing out the search/replace expression :%s/[PASTE YANKED PHRASE]//g and went on my day.

If you only want to paste a single word in ex mode, can make sure the cursor is on it before entering ex mode, and then hit <C-r><C-w> when in ex mode to paste the word.

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1  
Pasting text in the : command line is the best thing I learned today –  Shahbaz Jun 7 '12 at 9:40

A cool trick is to use "1p to paste the last delete/change (, and then use . to repeatedly to paste the subsequent deletes. In other words, "1p... is basically equivalent to "1p"2p"3p"4p.

You can use this to reverse-order a handful of lines: dddddddddd"1p....

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  • q5 records edits into register 5 (next q stops recording)
  • :reg show all registers and any contents in them
  • @5 execute register 5 macro (recorded edits)
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12  
I don't like the @ key to launch macros (three keystrokes). So I have mapped F2 to launch the macro stored in register q: nmap <F2> @q I use register q, because then to save a macro for F2 to playback, I just hit qq. speedy macro save and replay. –  mataap Aug 11 '11 at 0:24

I use the default register to grep for text in my vim window without having to reach for the mouse.

  1. yank text
  2. :!grep "<CTRL-R>0"<CR>
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From vim's help page:

CTRL-R {0-9a-z"%#:-=.}                  *c_CTRL-R* *c_<C-R>*
        Insert the contents of a numbered or named register.  Between
        typing CTRL-R and the second character '"' will be displayed
        <...snip...>
        Special registers:
            '"' the unnamed register, containing the text of
                the last delete or yank
            '%' the current file name
            '#' the alternate file name
            '*' the clipboard contents (X11: primary selection)
            '+' the clipboard contents
            '/' the last search pattern
            ':' the last command-line
            '-' the last small (less than a line) delete
            '.' the last inserted text
                            *c_CTRL-R_=*
            '=' the expression register: you are prompted to
                enter an expression (see |expression|)
                (doesn't work at the expression prompt; some
                things such as changing the buffer or current
                window are not allowed to avoid side effects)
                When the result is a |List| the items are used
                as lines.  They can have line breaks inside
                too.
                When the result is a Float it's automatically
                converted to a String.
        See |registers| about registers.  {not in Vi}
        <...snip...>
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A big source of confusion is the default register ". It is important to know the way it works. It is much better if the default register is avoided most of the times. The explanation from the Vim documentation:

Vim fills this register with text deleted with the "d", "c", "s", "x" commands
or copied with the yank "y" command, regardless of whether or not a specific
register was used (e.g.  "xdd).  This is like the unnamed register is pointing
to the last used register.

So the default register is actually a pointer to the last used register. When you delete, or yank something this register is going to point to other registers. You can test that by checking the registers. There is always another register that is exactly the same as the default register: the yank register ("0) , the first delete register("1) , small delete register("-) or any other register that was used to delete or yank.

The only exception is the black hole register. Vim doc says:

An exception is the '_' register: "_dd does not store the deleted text in any
register.

Usually you are much better off by using directly: "0, "- and "1-"9 default registers or named registers.

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Use registers in commands with @. E.g.:

echo @a
echo @0
echo @+

Set them in command:

let @a = 'abc'

Now "ap will paste abc.

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My favorite register is the ':' register. Running @: in Normal mode allows me to repeat the previously ran ex command.

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