Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose that I hava a String object reference and I assign it to an Object reference.This would implicitly perform widening.

Object o = "Hello World"

Now we cannot use any String methods on o. My Question is will there be any loss of data because of this typecasting, as in C++ where data would be lost if we cast a float into an int.

If I cast o back to String explicitly will I be able to access the actual String.

There are a lot of methods in Java which has Object type variable as an argument.So I can pass any type of object ref to this argument. Can I convert this object back to the original by narrowing it explicitly?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For objects, you're simply casting the reference. The object (String) still remains intact.

When you pass a String to a method call, you're simply passing the reference to it (as occurs when you encounter a return value). You can check and recast using

if (o instanceof String) {
   String s = (String)o;
}

and safely use that string (note that if you're doing this a lot it may point to an incorrect object modelling, but that's another issue)

Note that you also talk about floats/ints, and these are distinct from the above, since they're Java primitives, not references. See here for a discussion on casting primitives. Briefly, you will lose data here.

share|improve this answer

If you have a method which returns an object of Object class, you can return string and infact, you can return any Java object. Without any purpose, simply casting affects the performance (and more due to the immutability of the String). Infact, without casting to Object also, you can make of the methods of Object class. If you would like to know more of immutability affects, you can refer Introduction – Immutable Nature – Comparison

share|improve this answer

Suppose that I hava a String object reference and I assign it to an Object reference.This would implicitly perform widening

No. This does not perform widening, it performs casting

Will there be any loss of data because of this typecasting

No. The Object is still a String, regardless of the upcast. It can be downcast back to a String at any point.

Narrowing and Widening are defined with respect to primitive and reference conversions.
Upcasting and Downcasting (as you have used them) are defined with respect to identify conversion.

share|improve this answer

If you are sure that you have a String object, you can. But you can even test it runtime:

Object o = "Hello there!";
if (o instanceof String) {
    String s = (String) o;
    System.out.println("String length: " + s.length());
} else {
    System.out.println("Something else: " + o.getClass().getName());
}

Actually, testing is a good practice, if you don't want unexpected ClassCastExceptions.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.