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I recently started with a project of making a game (I'm kinda new) and I started thinking about how you can implement multi threads to boost the performance.

Suppose that you have a unit in a game and it has a position x and y. This position is updated from the internet by one tread, and another thread is using x,y to render the graphics of the unit (it has to know where it it).

Now say that you put a mutex, or sephamore (a bit unsure which one is the best to use) on these variables. The problem is of course for the rendering thread. You can't stop and wait, the game would become laggy. This is not a problem for the internet thread though. Unless it's something wrong, a couple of more milliseconds wont matter to update the game.

So I was thinking of how one could solve this problem and I got an idea. Say you create 2 sets of x,y (from now on lets only use x to make it simpler, but you get the idea). So you have x1 and x2.

  • Now the internet thread only updated x1.
  • The graphic threads uses x1 and then updates x2 to its current value.

Now here the idea. If x1 is in a lock from the internet thread, the graphics thread will just say

"Hey, I cant wait. I will just go ahead and use x2 since that is such a good approximated of the position."

And it will do so until x1 is free again. It will look something like this.

//Thread Graphics:
if (x1 is not locked){
    lock x1:
        use x1
    unlock x1:
    x2=x1
}else{
    use x2
}

//Thread Internet:

wait until x1 is unlocked:
lock x1:
    save data to x1
unlock x1:

Now I realise that this will take up some extra memory, but I think its worth it, at least if you limit your use of this technique to only critical pieces of data.

So my Question is: what do you guys think of this idea ? Maybe it's already a common technique, only I don't know the name of it. If you have any other feedback on how to solve problems like this I would appreciate it. I think this is a common problem for most programmers.

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This question might do better on gamedev.stackexchange.com –  xan Feb 20 '13 at 12:36

5 Answers 5

I like the idea, but I'm concerned about the ramifications of predicting actions in a game. Seems to me you'd be better off concentrating on making sure your mutex-protected (shared) data is protected in as small of sections as possible. For example, instead of locking the entire object during drawing, do a lock, copy what you need, then unlock then draw. Same thing on the internet side... wait for updates, get them, lock, update, unlock.

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i agree, and will use that aswell. I was just thinking about this as a extra thing to it –  Fredrik Boston Westman Feb 20 '13 at 12:50
    
Most client/server games use prediction to hide the effects of network lag. What they usually do is just send changes to a object's state, such as start moving at this velocity in this direction or stop moving, and periodically send absolute updates with the known current position. You used to see characters in quake snapping quite a lot when playing over slow network connections. This is why. –  user420442 Feb 20 '13 at 13:34
    
oh :) thanks :) good to now im heading down a tryed and tested way :) –  Fredrik Boston Westman Feb 20 '13 at 13:38

In my game, I run through a list of functions at the end of each frame.

Thread 1: Calls server for position

Thread 2: Renders frame for Object at X,Y

Thread 2: Checks for work from Thread 1.

Thread 2: No work, continuing.

Thread 1: Recieves X,Y!

Thread 1: Creates work object that will set final X,Y

Thread 1: Locks thread 2 work queue.

Thread 1: Pushes work object to work queue

Thread 1: Unlocks thread 2 work queue.

Thread 2: Renders frame for Object at X,Y

Thread 2: Checks for work from Thread 1.

Thread 2: FOUND WORK! Locking work queue...

Thread 2: Sets Object X,Y using Thread 1 work.

Thread 2: Deletes work object

Thread 2: Unlock work queue

Thread 2: Continues render loop

Or, alternativly, you could wait until the frame render finishes, pause for a moment, update the value, and then unpause the render thread.

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Im abit confused, but if i understood it rigth, the second thread is the rendering thread , and the first thread collecteds data, compile it together so it all finish to go and then gives it to the second thread –  Fredrik Boston Westman Feb 20 '13 at 12:53
    
@Fredrik Boston Westman Yes that's right. I like this over holding two seperate values because things will very quickly become unwieldy if you have more things to update than simple X and Y coordinates. This one saves memory in a way too: Once the data is updated, the work object is deleted. –  AStupidNoob Feb 20 '13 at 13:55

It's not a bad idea to use extra memory.

You can improve your algorithm if you don't keep x1 locked while processing the data.

Instead of this

//Thread Graphics:
if (x1 is not locked){
    lock x1:
        use x1
    unlock x1:
    x2=x1
}else{
    use x2
}

use something like this

//Thread Graphics:
if (x1 is not locked)
    lock x1:
        x2=x1
    unlock x1:

use x2
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Thanks thats a great idea :) but about the pointer idea. Dosnt just pointer point to where a value is stored ? so it x2 point to the same as x1 wouldnt that defeat the purpose, same value the both acces ? or maby its me that totally missunderstod that part:P –  Fredrik Boston Westman Feb 20 '13 at 13:06
    
@FredrikBostonWestman, I didn't write the actual swapping :) by x2 = x1 I mean swap(x1, x2). And I think we can't simply swap them. We'll probably need extra pointer(s) to make it correct. –  Nick Dandoulakis Feb 20 '13 at 13:13
    
@FredrikBostonWestman, better not do pointer swapping because x1 will get previous data. –  Nick Dandoulakis Feb 20 '13 at 13:28
    
yh i got that. The thing i didnt understand whas what you ment by pointers.( I have done most of my programming in java so its a bit of new territory for me). But pointer are references to where a value is stored in memory, insteed of passing the actual value, rigth ? But if you only pass a location, then the problem would still remain, would it not ? Caus thats still the same data the other tread is using. So if you have time, please elaborate what you meen by using pointers :) –  Fredrik Boston Westman Feb 20 '13 at 13:31
    
@FredrikBostonWestman, instead of copying whole objects we can swap references (pointers). So the actual object a thread is using will be swapped with another. The idea is the threads exchange the objects they use. –  Nick Dandoulakis Feb 20 '13 at 13:43

Actually, duplicating data is almost exactly what I was thinking of trying out at some point (in the far flung future). An idea that's very simple to do in C++ as well.

If you implement basic types for values (DualInt, DualFloat, etc) and provide all the standard operators, you can store the data internally in a two-element array. Your getters fetch element 0, while your setters modify element 1.

The trick comes in switching them over. All you need to do is have a reader/writer lock where your getters and setters use the reader part, and your switcher uses the writer part. You can have multiple readers reading (in actual fact getting old and setting new values), until you want to switch. Then you acquire the writer part of the lock (which prevents new readers and waits until all readers have finished), and switch a global variable which indicates which element is being read from and which is being written to.

No fuss, no bother, and no copying lots of values around.

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An intresting idea :) maby you could have a global variable, like a boolean which only one tread can change, and that tread change the value of it back and forth. If (vairable is true) read from index 1, else read from index 0. ect! –  Fredrik Boston Westman Feb 20 '13 at 14:07
    
Yes, that's what I was saying. But that thread needs to ensure nothing else is reading or writing while it's being flipped. An actual index would be faster than a bool, because you don't need to test and then chose an index, you just use the index that it's set to. Basically all you need to do is take the lock, and then do gDualIndex = 1 - gDualIndex; And release the lock. –  user420442 Feb 20 '13 at 14:56
    
hmm ok :) is gDualIndex a built in library ? Also, you are going to have more then one unit in the game, then you can have a thread that continusly lock, swithc, unlock then move on to the next unit. And it does this in a big loop so when its done with everybody it start over again. You just have to make sure that you dont have to many units ^^ or atleast sevral treads like this if you are going to have more. Like one for every players units or something –  Fredrik Boston Westman Feb 20 '13 at 17:17
    
No, gDualIndex is my hypothetical int variable that's controlling the read/write index for all Dual Values. That's the beauty of it. Everything must take a reader lock when getting and setting (which is fast), and only the thread that performs the switch takes the writer lock, and performs that one subtraction for all objects that are using this system. It is literally: lock, subtract, unlock, and all your objects are switched. –  user420442 Feb 20 '13 at 18:24
    
You do need a good reader/writer locking mechanism though, and you do need to implement the dual-type functionality for all data types your objects will need. –  user420442 Feb 20 '13 at 18:25

This is a nice way of maintaining thread safety, and can be extended if you think about double buffering. In projects I've worked on we had a thread-safe database that worked on a similar principle:

  • There are two copies of the data, the write-buffer and the read-buffer.
  • Whenever the database is written to it uses the write-buffer.
  • When it is read from it uses the read-buffer.
  • At the end of each frame the buffers are swapped, so the read-buffer is now the write-buffer and vice-versa.

You should be able to see the similarities to double-buffering in the render thread. This allowed us to maintain thread-safety throughout the project. The trade-off, of course, is that you are doubling your memory usage for anything in the database so it's not ideal for storing large amounts of data. Our biggest hits were usually rendering data and AI data which are only used in a single thread so this wasn't a big issue for us.

EDIT: I forgot to mention a second trade-off: when we changed a value in the database it wouldn't take effect until the next frame. This wasn't a massive issue for us, we just had to make sure we kept it in mind when we wrote our systems.

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Okay :) i got many responses that indicated that this is a good idea :) Got some questions tho . What kind off lock did you use when you swap the value? Trying to look up some but they are so unspecific, and everyone sais diffrent things, especilly about atomic. And the swap, did you have a seperate thread for that only managed the swap, and continuesly waited one frame between each swap? Also, the AI and rendering data project that you only used on thread for, that wasnt a multiuser program, was it ? hard to see how you would pull that off with only one thread if it was :) –  Fredrik Boston Westman Feb 21 '13 at 11:29
    
I'll try and answer you questions but it's going beyond the scope of the answer: 1) I think we used a semaphore lock - I can't remember precisely though, it might have been a simple mutex. 2) The swapping was done on the Game (main) thread - we didn't have a dedicated database thread. 3) I only meant that some data was accessed only by those specific threads (e.g. the AI thread and Rendering thread), so was not stored in the database. –  Bok McDonagh Feb 22 '13 at 2:27

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