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Suppose I have a class template which have a member pData, which is an AxB array of arbitary type T.

template <class T> class X{ 
public:
    int A;
    int B;
    T** pData;
    X(int a,int b);
    ~X();        
    void print(); //function which prints pData to screen

};  
template<class T>X<T>::X(int a, int b){ //constructor
    A = a;
    B = b;
    pData = new T*[A];
    for(int i=0;i<A;i++)
        pData[i]= new T[B];
    //Fill pData with something of type T
}
int main(){
    //...
    std::cout<<"Give the primitive type of the array"<<std::endl;
    std::cin>>type;
    if(type=="int"){
        X<int> XArray(a,b);
    } else if(type=="char"){
        X<char> Xarray(a,b);
    } else {
        std::cout<<"Not a valid primitive type!";
    } // can be many more if statements.
    Xarray.print() //this doesn't work, as Xarray is out of scope.
}

As the instance Xarray is constructed inside of an if statement, I cannot use it anywhere else. I tried to make a pointer before the if statements but as the type of the pointer is unknown at that point, I did not succeed.

What would be a proper way of dealing with this kind of a problem?

share|improve this question
    
There's no "obvious" answer to that because C++ is statically typed. You can't prompt the user for a type and then create that type and use it elsewhere -- you have to know the type at compile time! One technique that generally addresses this situation is "type erasure", but that requires that you specify some common element that all your types must have, and interface only via that common element (e.g. "printable"). –  Kerrek SB Feb 20 '13 at 12:39
    
Here, this might help you. –  bash.d Feb 20 '13 at 12:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

C++ is a statically typed language, meaning that you must know the type of objects at compile time. In this case you are basing the type of the object constructed on user input, so it's not possible to know the type at runtime.

The most common way to address this issue is to use dynamic polymorphism in which functions are invoked via a common interface using late binding. We accomplish this in C++ using virtual functions. For example:

struct IPrintable {
   virtual void print() = 0;
};

template<class T>
class X : public IPrintable {
  // Same code as you showed above.
};

int main() {
  std::cout<<"Give the primitive type of the array"<<std::endl;
  std::cin>>type;

  std::unique_ptr<IPrintable> XArray;

  if(type=="int"){
      XArray.reset(new X<int>(a,b));
  } else if(type=="char"){
      XArray.reset(new X<char>(a,b));
  } else {
      std::cout<<"Not a valid primitive type!";
  } // can be many more if statements.

  Xarray->print() // this works now!
}

This solves the out of scope issue and allows you to print using the dynamic type of the XArray variable. Virtual functions are the secret sauce that make this possible.

share|improve this answer
    
Inheritance is not the only possible solution. In other languages, you may have no choices, but in C++, there are many ways of achieving this result. Creating a base class and enforcing inheritance just because two objects share a common attribute seems a bit extreme to me. Not to mention that this somehow forces the types to become "entity classes" and prevents them from being "value classes" (they can't be copied that easily, and comparison becomes more complex). –  ereOn Feb 20 '13 at 13:01
    
I didn't mean to imply that it's the only option. But it's usually the simplest option when other factors are not relevant. Given the OP's exact question there's no reason to use something more complex like callbacks or visitors. Also, the issue about copying is moot provided the base classes are all empty interfaces since you don't have to worry about slicing. –  Chris Hayden Feb 20 '13 at 13:08
    
Please note that I didn't say either that it was a bad solution. We just can't know (the OP may not be telling us about all the constraints he has to face). Visitors are not complicated. It is actually one of the dumbest thing I have ever seen. It is just that I don't think people learning C++ should not be encouraged to think that object-oriented programming with inheritance is the only solution: I see every week dozens of Java programmers coming to C++ that think that, and it is really boring. –  ereOn Feb 20 '13 at 13:17
    
Thank you, all the answers were very helpful. I chose this as accepted as this is exactly what I was thinking, but didn't know if and how it can be done. –  Hemmo Feb 21 '13 at 5:39
1  
You can't get direct access to pData using this technique. If you need to do something with pData then there are two main options. The first is to expand printable and/or define another interface and have XArray implement it to do whatever it is that you need to do with pData. The second is to use the visitor pattern as suggested in the other solution. –  Chris Hayden Feb 21 '13 at 12:41

The problem here is that X<int> and x<char> are completely unrelated types.

The fact that they are both a result of the same templated class won't help here.

I can see several solutions, but those depends on what you really need.

You could, for instance make the X<> instances derive from a common non-templated base class that has the print() method (eventually as a pure virtual). But before you do that, be sure that it makes sense on a functional level: one should use inheritance because it makes sense, not solely because of technical constraints. And if you do that, you probably will want to have a virtual destructor as well.

You could also bind and store a std::function<void ()> to the method you want to call, but ensure that the objects are still "alive" (they aren't in your current code: both the X<int> and X<char> are destroyed when they go out of scope, way before you actually call print()).

A final solution would be to make some variant type that is compatible with both X<int> and X<char> (boost::variant<> can help here). You could then write a visitor that implements the print() functionality for each type.

Picking the last solution, it would become something like:

typedef boost::variant<X<int>, X<char>> genericX;

class print_visitor : public boost::static_visitor<void>
{
public:
    template <typename SomeType>
    void operator()(const SomeType& x) const
    {
        // Your print implementation
        // x is your underlying instance, either X<char> or X<int>.
        // You may also make several non-templated overloads of
        // this operator if you want to provide different implementations.
    }
};

int main()
{
  boost::optional<genericX> my_x;

  if (type=="int") {
    my_x = X<int>(a,b);
  } else if(type=="char") {
    my_x = X<char>(a,b);
  }

  // This calls the appropriate print.
  if (my_x) {
    boost::apply_visitor(print_visitor(), *my_x)
  }
}

We actually lack the knowledge to give a definitive answer: if your classes are "entities", then you probably should go for inheritance. If they are more like "value classes", then the variant way might be more suited.

share|improve this answer

Rather than trying to fit the templates into main I would go the opposite way than the rest of the suggestions... move the code out of main and into it's own (possibly templated) function that needs to deal with a single type:

template <typename T>
void generateAndPrint(int a, int b) {
   X<T> x(a,b);
   x.print();
}
int main() { ...
   if (type=="int") generateAndPrint<int>(a,b);
   else if (type=="char") generateAndPrint<char>(a,b);
   else ...
}
share|improve this answer

If you want to work with different arrays, whatever their type, templates alone cannot help you. Currently, there is exactly no relationship between X<int> and X<char>.

If you want to treat them as two subtypes of a common type, you will have to use inheritance (and dynamically allocated variables). For instance, all X<T> may inherit the same base class, say Printable, and you can store the data in a unique_ptr<Printable>:

unique_ptr<Printable> r;
if(type=="int"){
    r.reset(new X<int>(a,b));
} else if(type=="char"){        
    r.reset(new X<char>(a,b);
}
r->print();

But this is probably not the best design.

A probably better solution would be, instead of trying to work outside of the if, to move all the work inside of the if. In your simple example, this could be done by duplicating the call to print, but this is not pretty nice either. But, going toward this idea, we can create a template function that does the job:

template<class T>
void workWithType(int a, int b)
{
   X<T> Xarray(a, b);
   Xarray.print();
}

//...

if(type=="int"){
    workWithType<int>(a,b);
} else if(type=="char"){
    workWithType<char>(a,b);
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Inheritance doesn't necessarily mean that he will have to use dynamic allocation. –  ereOn Feb 20 '13 at 12:57

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