Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Renaming of files and folder in batch is a question often asked but after some search I think none is similar to mine.

Background: we send some biological samples to a service provider which returns files with unique names and a table in text format containing, amongst other information, the file name and the sample that originated it:

head samples.txt
fq_file Sample_ID   Sample_name Library_ID  FC_Number   Track_Lanes_Pos
L2369_Track-3885_R1.fastq.gz    S1746_B_7_t B 7 t   L2369_B_7_t 163 6
L2349_Track-3865_R1.fastq.gz    S1726_A_3_t A 3 t   L2349_A_3_t 163 5
L2354_Track-3870_R1.fastq.gz    S1731_A_GFP_c   A GFP c L2354_A_GFP_c   163 5
L2377_Track-3893_R1.fastq.gz    S1754_B_7_c B 7 c   L2377_B_7_c 163 7
L2362_Track-3878_R1.fastq.gz    S1739_B_GFP_t   B GFP t L2362_B_GFP_t   163 6

The directory structure (for 34 directories):

L2369_Track-3885_
   accepted_hits.bam      
   deletions.bed   
   junctions.bed         
   logs
   accepted_hits.bam.bai  
   insertions.bed  
   left_kept_reads.info
L2349_Track-3865_
   accepted_hits.bam      
   deletions.bed   
   junctions.bed         
   logs
   accepted_hits.bam.bai  
   insertions.bed  
   left_kept_reads.info

Goal: because the file names are meaningless and hard to interpret, I want to rename the files ending in .bam (keeping the suffix) and the folders with the correspondent sample name, re-ordered in a more suitable manner. The result should look like:

7_t_B
   7_t_B..bam      
   deletions.bed   
   junctions.bed         
   logs
   7_t_B.bam.bai  
   insertions.bed  
   left_kept_reads.info
3_t_A
   3_t_A.bam      
   deletions.bed   
   junctions.bed         
   logs
   accepted_hits.bam.bai  
   insertions.bed  
   left_kept_reads.info

I've hacked together a solution with bash and python (newbie) but it feels over-engineered. The question is whether there is a more simple/elegant way of doing it that I've missed? Solutions can be in python, bash, and R. could also be awk since I am trying to learn it. Being a relative beginner does make one complicate things.

This is my solution:

A wrapper puts it all in place and gives an idea of the workflow:

#! /bin/bash

# select columns of interest and write them to a file - basenames
tail -n +2 samples.txt |  cut -d$'\t' -f1,3 >> BAMfilames.txt 

# call my little python script that creates a new .sh with the renaming commmands
./renameBamFiles.py

# finally do the renaming
./renameBam.sh

# and the folders to
./renameBamFolder.sh

renameBamFiles.py:

#! /usr/bin/env python
import re

# Read in the data sample file and create a bash file that will remane the tophat output 
# the reanaming will be as follows:
# mv L2377_Track-3893_R1_ L2377_Track-3893_R1_SRSF7_cyto_B
# 

# Set the input file name
# (The program must be run from within the directory 
#  that contains this data file)
InFileName = 'BAMfilames.txt'


### Rename BAM files

# Open the input file for reading
InFile = open(InFileName, 'r')


# Open the output file for writing
OutFileName= 'renameBam.sh'

OutFile=open(OutFileName,'a') # You can append instead with 'a'

OutFile.write("#! /bin/bash"+"\n")
OutFile.write(" "+"\n")


# Loop through each line in the file
for Line in InFile:
    ## Remove the line ending characters
    Line=Line.strip('\n')

    ## Separate the line into a list of its tab-delimited components
    ElementList=Line.split('\t')

    # separate the folder string from the experimental name
    fileroot=ElementList[1]
    fileroot=fileroot.split()

    # create variable names using regex
    folderName=re.sub(r'^(.*)(\_)(\w+).*', r'\1\2\3\2', ElementList[0])
    folderName=folderName.strip('\n')
    fileName = "%s_%s_%s" % (fileroot[1], fileroot[2], fileroot[0])

    command= "for file in %s/accepted_hits.*; do mv $file ${file/accepted_hits/%s}; done" % (folderName, fileName)

    print command
    OutFile.write(command+"\n")  


# After the loop is completed, close the files
InFile.close()
OutFile.close()


### Rename folders

# Open the input file for reading
InFile = open(InFileName, 'r')


# Open the output file for writing
OutFileName= 'renameBamFolder.sh'

OutFile=open(OutFileName,'w') 

OutFile.write("#! /bin/bash"+"\n")
OutFile.write(" "+"\n")


# Loop through each line in the file
for Line in InFile:
    ## Remove the line ending characters
    Line=Line.strip('\n')

    ## Separate the line into a list of its tab-delimited components
    ElementList=Line.split('\t')

    # separate the folder string from the experimental name
    fileroot=ElementList[1]
    fileroot=fileroot.split()

    # create variable names using regex
    folderName=re.sub(r'^(.*)(\_)(\w+).*', r'\1\2\3\2', ElementList[0])
    folderName=folderName.strip('\n')
    fileName = "%s_%s_%s" % (fileroot[1], fileroot[2], fileroot[0])

    command= "mv %s %s" % (folderName, fileName)

    print command

    OutFile.write(command+"\n")  


# After the loop is completed, close the files
InFile.close()
OutFile.close()

RenameBam.sh - created by the previous python script:

#! /bin/bash

for file in L2369_Track-3885_R1_/accepted_hits.*; do mv $file ${file/accepted_hits/7_t_B}; done
for file in L2349_Track-3865_R1_/accepted_hits.*; do mv $file ${file/accepted_hits/3_t_A}; done
for file in L2354_Track-3870_R1_/accepted_hits.*; do mv $file ${file/accepted_hits/GFP_c_A}; done
(..)

Rename renameBamFolder.sh is very similar:

mv L2369_Track-3885_R1_ 7_t_B
mv L2349_Track-3865_R1_ 3_t_A
mv L2354_Track-3870_R1_ GFP_c_A
mv L2377_Track-3893_R1_ 7_c_B

Since I am learning, I feel that some examples of different ways of doing this, and thinking about how to do it, will be very useful.

share|improve this question
2  
Using Python to generate bash seems a bit pointless. I'd say pick one language or the other and just use it. Python is perhaps less mysterious if you're not very accustomed to either. –  John Zwinck Feb 20 '13 at 13:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One simple way in bash:

find . -type d -print |
while IFS= read -r oldPath; do

   parent=$(dirname "$oldPath")
   old=$(basename "$oldPath")
   new=$(awk -v old="$old" '$1~"^"old{print $4"_"$5"_"$3}' samples.txt)

   if [ -n "$new" ]; then
      newPath="${parent}/${new}"
      echo mv "$oldPath" "$newPath"
      echo mv "${newPath}/accepted_hits.bam" "${newPath}/${new}.bam"
   fi
done

Remove the "echo"s after initial testing to get it to actually do the "mv"s.

If all of your target directories are at one level as @triplee's answer implies, then it's even simpler. Just cd to their parent directory and do:

awk 'NR>1{sub(/[^_]+$/,"",$1); print $1" "$4"_"$5"_"$3}' samples.txt |
while read -r old new; do
   echo mv "$old" "$new"
   echo mv "${new}/accepted_hits.bam" "${new}/${new}.bam"
done

In one of your expected outputs you renamed the ".bai" file, in the other you didn't and you didn't say if you want to do that or not. If you want to rename it too just add

echo mv "${new}/accepted_hits.bam.bai" "${new}/${new}.bam.bai"

to whatever solution above you prefer.

share|improve this answer
    
The awk solution is by far the most elegant, imo, and even though I've never learn awk I intuitively managed to change the script to rename another, similar, set of files based on your solution. The only thing you might consider changing in your solution @EdMorton is the order of the fields: print $1" "$4""$5""$3 should be print $1" "$3""$4""$2. Thanks a lot. –  fridaymeetssunday Feb 22 '13 at 14:46

Of course you can do it only in Python - and it can yield a small readble script for that.

First thing on: read the sampels.txt fil and create a map from existing file prefixes to desired mapping prefixes - the file is not formatted to use the Python CSV reader module, as the column separator is used inside the last data column.

mapping = {}
with open("samples.txt") as samples:
   # throw away headers
   samples.readline()
   for line in samples():
       # separate the columns spliting the first  whitespace ocurrences:
       # (either space sequences or tabs)
       fields = line.split()
       # skipp blank, malformed lines:
       if len(fields) < 6: 
           continue
       fq_file, sample_id, Sample_name, Library_ID,  FC_Number,  track_lanes_pos, *other = fields
       # the [:-2] part is to trhow awauy the "R1"  sufix as for the example above
       file_prefix = fq_file.split(".")[0][:-2]
       target_id = "_".join((Library_ID, FC_number. Sample_name))
       mapping[file_prefix] = target_id

Then check the dir names, and inside each one the ".bam" files for remapping.

import os
for entry in os.listdir("."):
     if entry in mapping:
         dir_prefix = "./" + entry + "/")
         for file_entry in os.listdir(dir_prefix):
              if ".bam" in file_entry:
                   parts = file_entry.split(".bam")
                   parts[0] = mapping[entry]
                   new_name = ".bam".join(parts)

                   os.rename(dir_prefix + file_entry, dir_prefix + new_name)
         os.rename(entry, mapping[entry])
share|improve this answer

Seems that you could simply read the required fields from the index file in a simple while loop. It's not obvious how the file is structured, so I am assuming that the file is whitespace-separated and that the Sample_Id is actually four fields (complex sample_id, then three components from the name). Maybe you have a tab-delimited file with internal spaces in the Sample_Id field? Anyhow, this should be easy to adapt if my assumptions are wrong.

# Skip the annoying field names
tail +1 samples.txt |
while read fq _ c a b chaff; do
    dir=${fq%R1.fastq.gz}
    new="${a}_${b}_$c"
    echo mv "$dir"/accepted_hits.bam "$dir/$new".bam
    echo mv "$dir"/accepted_hits.bam.bai "$dir/$new".bam.bai
    echo mv "$dir" "$new"
done

Take out the echos if the output looks like what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
The file is tab delimited and some fields have spaces in them. That's why the OP is using cut -d$'\t' in his script. If you click "edit" on the question you will see the tabs. –  dogbane Feb 20 '13 at 14:13
    
My apologies @tripleee, the fields are tab delimited and the I am using the field Sample_name, although it does not have to be that particular field. –  fridaymeetssunday Feb 20 '13 at 14:17

Here's one way using a shell script. Run like:

script.sh /path/to/samples.txt /path/to/data

Contents of script.sh:

# add directory names to an array
while IFS= read -r -d '' dir; do

    dirs+=("$dir")

done < <(find $2/* -type d -print0)


# process the sample list
while IFS=$'\t' read -r -a list; do

    for i in "${dirs[@]}"; do

        # if the directory is in the sample list
        if [ "${i##*/}" == "${list[0]%R1.fastq.gz}" ]; then

            tag="${list[3]}_${list[4]}_${list[2]}"
            new="${i%/*}/$tag"
            bam="$new/accepted_hits.bam"

            # only change name if there's a bam file
            if [ -n $bam ]; then

                mv "$i" "$new"
                mv "$bam" "$new/$tag.bam"
            fi
        fi
    done

done < <(tail -n +2 $1)
share|improve this answer

Although it's not exactly what you're looking for (just thinking outside the box): you might consider a alternate "view" of your file system -- using the term "view" like a database view is to a table. You could do this via a "file system in user space", FUSE. One can do this with a number of existing utilities, but I don't know of one that just generically works with any set of files, specifically for just renaming/re-organizing. But as a concrete example of how it can be used, pytagsfs creates a virtual (fuse) file system based on rules you define, making a directory structure of files appear however you want. (Maybe this would work for you, too -- but pytagsfs is actually intended for media files.) And then you just operate on that (virtual) file system, using whatever programs normally access that data. Or, to make the virtual directory structure permanent (if pytagsfs doesn't have an option to do this already), just copy the virtual file system to into another directory (outside the virtual file system).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.