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I’m writing a simple client-server app which for the time being will be for my own personal use. I’m using Winsock for the net communication. I have not done any networking for the last 10 years, so I am quite rusty. I’d like to use as little external code as possible, so I have written a home-made server discovery mechanism, as follows.

The client broadcasts a message containing the ‘name’ of a client UDP socket bound to an arbitrary port, which I will call the client’s discovery socket. The server recv() the broadcast and then sendto() the client discovery socket the ‘name’ of its listening socket. The client then uses this info to connect to the server (on a different socket). This mechanism should allow the server to bind its listening socket to the first port it can within the dynamic port range (49152-65535) and to the clients to discover where the server is and on which port it is listening.

The server part works fine: the server receives the broadcast messages and successfully sends its response.

On the client side the firewall log shows that the server’s response arrives to the machine and that it is addressed to the correct port (to the client’s discovery socket). But the message never makes it to the client app. I’ve tried doing a recv() in blocking and non-blocking mode, and there is never any data available. ioctlsocket() always shows no data is available, even though I know the packet got it to the machine.

The server succeeds on doing a recv() on broadcasted data. But the client fails on doing a recv() of the server’s response which is addressed to its discovery socket.

The question is very vague: what gotchas should I watch for in this scenario? Why would recv() fail to get a packet which has actually arrived to the machine? The sockets are UDP, so the fact that they are not connected is irrelevant. Or is it?

Many thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

The client broadcasts a message containing the ‘name’ of a client UDP socket bound to an arbitrary port, which I will call the client’s discovery socket.

The message doesn't need to contain anything. Just broadcast an empty message from the 'discovery socket'. recvfrom() will tell the server where it came from, and it can just reply directly.

The server recv() the broadcast and then sendto() the client discovery socket the ‘name’ of its listening socket.

Fair enough, although actually the server could just broadcast its own TCP listening port every 5 seconds or whatever.

On the client side the firewall log shows that the server’s response arrives to the machine and that it is addressed to the correct port (to the client’s discovery socket). But the message never makes it to the client app

If it got to the host it must get to the application. You must have got the ports mixed up somehow. Simplify it as above and retry.

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Thank you EJP, I did not know that recvfrom() does not need to know the remote address; I will use that. –  user1752563 Feb 22 '13 at 16:10
    
@user1752563 I didn't say recvfrom() doesn't need to know the remote address. I said you can get the remote address by using recvfrom(), so you don't have to put it in the payload. Actually I may be thinking of recvmsg(); anyway one of them takes parameters that give you the source address –  EJP Feb 22 '13 at 22:11
    
No, you were right: you can use recvfrom on un unconnected datagram socket and if you pass the appropriate arguments you will be told the remote socket address. –  user1752563 Feb 23 '13 at 10:02

Well, it was one of those stupid situations: Windows Firewall was active, besides the other firewall, and silently dropping packets. Deactivating it solved the problem.

But I still don’t understand how it works, as it was allowing the server to receive packets sent through broadcasting. And when I got at my wits end and set the server to answer back through a broadcast, THOSE packets got dropped.

Two days of frustration. I hope someone profits from my experience.

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