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I'm running eclipse Juno, with Tomcat 7.0.29. I have some files that are saved to the root of the webapp by my webapp and I want to delete them. I'm trying to find the localhost folder in order to be able to do this. Everything I'm reading tells me it should be at /var/www, however there is not /www directory in var. Where could it be?

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Where's your tomcat installation path? –  Luiggi Mendoza Feb 20 '13 at 15:32

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Since you're using Eclipse IDE and you don't know where your Tomcat installation folder is, you can find it using the IDE by going to Windows/Preferences. It will pop a Preferences window, select the Server/Runtime Environment option in the left tree, in the right side must appear Apache Tomcat v7.x. Select it from the list and select the Edit... option, it will show you the tomcat installation directory. Let's call this folder <tomcat>

Now you know the folder installation, but maybe Eclipse is not using it to deploy the Java Web applications. To make sure of this, in your Eclipse, go to the Servers view (if it's not visible in the IDE, go to Window/Show view/Servers), it will show you your tomcat server (and others), double click on it. In the Tomcat overview window, check the Server locations panel, expand it and check where the webapp is deployed:

  • If selected option is Use Tomcat installation then the web app must be in <tomcat>webapps
  • If selected option is Use workspace metadata then the web app must be in your workspace inside .metadata/.plugins/org.eclipse.wst.server.core/tmp[number]/wtpwebapps (thanks to Lars Vogel blog post). This is a special folder created by Eclipse.
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While this answer led me to conclusion what my final solution turned out to be was that my browser cache needed emptying. It wasn't that the files were being stored or not overwritten, it was just that they were in the browser cache (they were images). –  user1584500 Feb 20 '13 at 16:35
    
@user1584500 well, that was unexpected. When I make my tests, I tend to use chrome, firefox and IE (last one is not my favorite but some people still use it). –  Luiggi Mendoza Feb 20 '13 at 16:38

Default tomcat folder is at /var/lib/tomcat7. Your webapps are under /var/lib/tomcat7/webapps

Not sure what localhost folder you are referring to. There is /etc/tomcat7/Catalina/localhost but I dont see a reason why you should be touching it.

This assumes you used standard Ubuntu tools to install tomcat.

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This depends how OP has installed tomcat. Maybe he/she just download it from internet as a tar.gz file and uncompressed it somewhere else. –  Luiggi Mendoza Feb 20 '13 at 15:36
    
There's not tomcat directory in /var. I haven't changed the default as far as I'm aware, could it be anywhere else? –  user1584500 Feb 20 '13 at 15:39
    
yes i just uncompressed it in my downloads folder. –  user1584500 Feb 20 '13 at 15:40
    
@user1584500 in your Eclipse, go to Windows/Preferences. It will open a window, check in the left tree for Server/Runtime Environment, then it will appear Apache Tomcat v7.x. Select it from the list and select the Edit... option, it will show you the tomcat installation directory. –  Luiggi Mendoza Feb 20 '13 at 15:41
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@user1584500 in your Eclipse, go to the Servers view, it will show you your tomcat server, double click on it. In the Tomcat overview window, check the Server locations panel, expand it and check where the webapp is deployed. If selected option is Use Tomcat installation, then the webapp must be in <tomcat_installation_folder>/webapps, otherwise it must be in your workspace inside an special folder created by Eclipse (I'm not sure about this last one). –  Luiggi Mendoza Feb 20 '13 at 15:50

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