Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a bunch of threads that generate events of type A and type B.

My program takes these events, wraps them in a message and sends them across the network. A message can hold either one A event, one B event, or one A event and one B event:

SendMessage(new Message(a: 1,    b: null));
SendMessage(new Message(a: null, b: 2   ));
SendMessage(new Message(a: 3,    b: 4   ));

Events of type A happen quite frequently, while events of type B occur much less often. So, when a thread generates a B event, my program waits a bit to see if another thread generates an A event and combines the A event and the B event if possible.

Here is my code:

object gate = new object();
int? pendingB;

Message WrapA(int a, int millisecondsTimeout)
{
    int? b;

    lock (gate)
    {
        b = pendingB;
        pendingB = null;
        Monitor.Pulse(gate);
    }

    return new Message(a, b);
}

Message WrapB(int b, int millisecondsTimeout)
{
    lock (gate)
    {
        if (pendingB == null)
        {
            pendingB = b;
            Monitor.Wait(gate, millisecondsTimeout);
            if (pendingB != b) return null;
            pendingB = null;
        }
    }

    return new Message(null, b);
}

This works so far. However, there are two problems:

  • If there are lots of A events and lots of B events, the algorithm is not very efficient: Only a certain percentage of B events is attached to A events, even when there are enough A events.

  • If there are no A events generated for a while (uncommon, but not impossible), the algorithm is completely unfair: One thread generating B events has to wait every time, while all other threads can send their B events right away.

How can I improve efficiency and fairness of the algorithm?

Constraints:
•  WrapA and WrapB must terminate within a short, deterministic amount of time.
•  SendMessage must be called outside any locks.
•  There is no synchronization mechanism available other than gate.
•  There are not additional threads, tasks, timers, etc. available.
•  Since events of type A happen so frequently in the normal case, busy-waiting in WrapB is fine.


Here is a test program that can be used as a benchmark:

public static class Program
{
    static int counter0 = 0;
    static int counterA = 0;
    static int counterB = 0;
    static int counterAB = 0;

    static void SendMessage(Message m)
    {
        if (m != null)
            if (m.a != null)
                if (m.b != null)
                    Interlocked.Increment(ref counterAB);
                else
                    Interlocked.Increment(ref counterA);
            else
                if (m.b != null)
                    Interlocked.Increment(ref counterB);
                else
                    Interlocked.Increment(ref counter0);
    }

    static Thread[] Start(int threadCount, int eventCount,
        int eventInterval, int wrapTimeout, Func<int, int, Message> wrap)
    {
        Thread[] threads = new Thread[threadCount * eventCount];
        for (int i = 0; i < threadCount; i++)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < eventCount; j++)
            {
                int k = i * 1000 + j;
                int l = j * eventInterval + i;
                threads[i * eventCount + j] = new Thread(() =>
                {
                    Thread.Sleep(l);
                    SendMessage(wrap(k, wrapTimeout));
                });
                threads[i * eventCount + j].Start();
            }
        }
        return threads;
    }

    static void Join(params Thread[] threads)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < threads.Length; i++)
        {
            threads[i].Join();
        }
    }

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var wrapper = new MessageWrapper();
        var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

        // Only A events
        var t0 = Start(10, 40, 7, 1000, wrapper.WrapA);
        Join(t0);

        // A and B events
        var t1 = Start(10, 40, 7, 1000, wrapper.WrapA);
        var t2 = Start(10, 10, 19, 1000, wrapper.WrapB);
        Join(t1);
        Join(t2);

        // Only B events
        var t3 = Start(10, 20, 7, 1000, wrapper.WrapB);
        Join(t3);

        Console.WriteLine(sw.Elapsed);

        Console.WriteLine("0:  {0}", counter0);
        Console.WriteLine("A:  {0}", counterA);
        Console.WriteLine("B:  {0}", counterB);
        Console.WriteLine("AB: {0}", counterAB);

        Console.WriteLine("Generated A: {0}, Sent A: {1}",
            10 * 40 + 10 * 40, counterA + counterAB);
        Console.WriteLine("Generated B: {0}, Sent B: {1}",
            10 * 10 + 10 * 20, counterB + counterAB);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Would you have a compiling test project so we can play with it? –  Simon Mourier Feb 22 '13 at 17:03
    
The algorithm is part of a larger program. It's difficult to provide example code that generates events in the same way the real code does. For the purpose of this question, you can just spin up a bunch up threads calling WrapA and WrapB and test with different numbers of threads and intervals between events. –  dtb Feb 22 '13 at 17:09
    
I think such a sample program would be interesting, even for you, since the question is very "pure" and independent from other considerations. Anyway, your small test code doesn't uses the WrapA. How are these supposed to be combined with the WrapB since you have some kind or ratio between them? 'lot', 'few', 'for a while' are not very informative :-) –  Simon Mourier Feb 22 '13 at 17:16
    
I've added an expanded test program. It measures the time it takes to generate and send a certain amount of events, and how many messages of each type are sent. You have to play a bit with the constants; for example, if you set aThreadCount to 0 then you see the fairness problem. I know that 'lot', 'few' and 'for a while' isn't very precise, but that's all I can say at them moment. If it turns out that the answer to this question doesn't perform well in the real word, that shall be my problem and not the answer's. I'll try to come up with a better benchmark program though. –  dtb Feb 22 '13 at 17:41
1  
+1 for a fun and interesting problem. But where do these constraints come from? Are you actually coding for an embedded device or some other limited Environment? –  Christoffer Feb 26 '13 at 8:44

15 Answers 15

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+500

For the fun of it, here is a lock-free implementation:

public sealed class MessageWrapper
{
    private int pendingB;

    public Message WrapA(int a, int millisecondsTimeout)
    {
        int b = Interlocked.Exchange(ref pendingB, -1);
        return new Message(a, b == -1 ? null : b);
    }

    public Message WrapB(int b, int millisecondsTimeout)
    {
        var sw = new SpinWait();
        while (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref pendingB, b, -1) != -1)
        {
            // Spin
            sw.SpinOnce();

            if (sw.NextSpinWillYield)
            {
                // Let us make progress instead of yielding the processor
                // (avoid context switch)
                return new Message(null, b);
            }
        }

        return null;
    }
}

Results

Original implementation:

00:00:02.0433298
0:  0
A:  733
B:  233
AB: 67
Generated A: 800, Sent A: 800
Generated B: 300, Sent B: 300

Lock-free implementation:

00:00:01.2546310
0:  0
A:  717
B:  217
AB: 83
Generated A: 800, Sent A: 800
Generated B: 300, Sent B: 300

Update

Unfortunately, above implementation has a bug plus some shortcoming. Here is an improved version:

public class MessageWrapper
{
    private int pendingB = EMPTY;
    private const int EMPTY = -1;

    public Message WrapA(int a, int millisecondsTimeout)
    {
        int? b;
        int count = 0;
        while ((b = Interlocked.Exchange(ref pendingB, EMPTY)) == EMPTY)
        {
            if (count % 7 == 0)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(0);
            }
            else if (count % 23 == 0)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(1);
            }
            else
            {
                Thread.Yield();
            }
            if (++count == 480)
            {
                return new Message(a, null);
            }
        }
        return new Message(a, b);
    }

    public Message WrapB(int b, int millisecondsTimeout)
    {
        int count = 0;
        while (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref pendingB, b, EMPTY) != EMPTY)
        {
            // Spin
            Thread.SpinWait((4 << count++));
            if (count > 10)
            {
                // We didn't manage to place our payload.
                // Let's send it ourselves:
                return new Message(null, b);
            }
        }

        // We placed our payload. 
        // Wait some more to see if some WrapA snatches it.
        while (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref pendingB, EMPTY, EMPTY) == b)
        {
            Thread.SpinWait((4 << count++));
            if (count > 20)
            {
                // No WrapA came along. Pity, we will have to send it ourselves
                int payload = Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref pendingB, EMPTY, b);
                return payload == b ? new Message(null, b) : null;
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
}

Results:

OP's implementation

00:00:02.1389474
0:  0
A:  722
B:  222
AB: 78
Generated A: 800, Sent A: 800
Generated B: 300, Sent B: 300

Second implementation:

00:00:01.2752425
0:  0
A:  700
B:  200
AB: 100
Generated A: 800, Sent A: 800
Generated B: 300, Sent B: 300
share|improve this answer
    
Neat. And if you change it to use SpinUntil() you can honor the timeout as well, and would fullfill the constraint on deterministic exeution :-) –  Christoffer Feb 26 '13 at 12:27
1  
Actually, above implementation is deterministic. Each thread that enters the WrapB method will spin for a maximum of 4 + 8 + 16 + ... + 1024 + 2048 + 4096 = 8188 iterations on a multi processor system (and not at all on a single processor system). After that the NextSpinWillYield property will return true and the thread will return from the method call. –  afrischke Feb 26 '13 at 21:33
    
That's interesting, where did you find those numbers? MSDN only states "On machines with multiple CPUs, SpinOnce may yield after an unspecified number of calls." –  Christoffer Feb 27 '13 at 7:54
1  
In the SpinWait.cs source code. ;-) Note, that "unspecified" does not mean "random". The actual number of iterations is an implementation detail that may change in the future, so it is not specified in the documentation. The number of iterations increases exponentially with each call to SpinWait.SpinOnce(). Internally SpinWait keeps a counter (accessible via SpinWait.Count) and on each call to SpinWait.SpinOnce() the thread spins for 4 << m_count, unless NextSpinWillYield returns true which is the case if (a) the code is executing on a single processor machine or... –  afrischke Feb 27 '13 at 8:27
1  
Btw. if you are interested in all the details of the SpinWait implementation, I can't recommend Joe Duffy's "Concurrent Programming On Windows" highly enough (see chapter 14, section "Spin Waiting"). –  afrischke Feb 27 '13 at 11:23

For diversity, I tried an approach based on the concurrent collections. To me it's not clear from the posted constraints whether that is okay but I'll shoot my answer anyway:

This is the typical output from your original code on my machine:

00:00:01.7835426
0:  0
A:  723
B:  223
AB: 77
Generated A: 800, Sent A: 800
Generated B: 300, Sent B: 300

This is the typical output from my suggestion, about 20% slower than the original code but it captures more 'AB' messages:

00:00:02.1322512
0:  0
A:  701
B:  201
AB: 99
Generated A: 800, Sent A: 800
Generated B: 300, Sent B: 300

MessageWrapper implementation:

public class MessageWrapper
{
    private BlockingCollection<int?> messageA = new BlockingCollection<int?>();
    private BlockingCollection<int?> messageB = new BlockingCollection<int?>();

    public Message WrapA(int a, int millisecondsTimeout)
    {
        messageA.Add(a);
        return CreateMessage(0);
    }

    public Message WrapB(int b, int millisecondsTimeout)
    {
        messageB.Add(b);
        return CreateMessage(millisecondsTimeout);
    }

    private Message CreateMessage(int timeout)
    {
        int? a, b;

        if (messageB.TryTake(out b) | messageA.TryTake(out a, timeout))
        {
            return new Message(a, b);
        }
        else
        {
            return null;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Seems to be a perfect candidate for Reactive Extesions. You can use the Buffer method to group events or other similar extensions to filter and combine events.

Maybe this solution doesn't match one of your constraint but in my opinion it's the best solution. Reactive Extensions are very powerful.

share|improve this answer
    
I would definitely give Reactive Extensions a try. v2.0 should be reasonably fast and able to work very good with deterministic time handling. Rx create their own threads and timers, so this constraint is broken, but hopefully it's not a hard, system constraint –  Honza Brestan Feb 27 '13 at 23:35

I'll give another suggestion that follows the given constraints a bit more strictly; on my machine this implementation consistently catches 97 or more 'AB' messages when running the test program, with about 5% performance degradation from the original code:

class MessageWrapper
{
    object gate = new object();
    int? pendingB;

    public Message WrapA(int a, int millisecondsTimeout)
    {
        Message returnMessage = null;
        bool lockTaken = false;

        Monitor.TryEnter(gate, 100, ref lockTaken);

        if (lockTaken)
        {
            returnMessage = new Message(a, pendingB);

            pendingB = null;
            Monitor.Pulse(gate);

            Monitor.Exit(gate);
        }
        else
        {
            returnMessage = new Message(a, null);
        }

        return returnMessage;
    }

    public Message WrapB(int b, int millisecondsTimeout)
    {
        Message returnMessage = null;
        bool lockTaken = false;

        Monitor.TryEnter(gate, 100, ref lockTaken);

        if (lockTaken)
        {
            if (pendingB != null)
            {
                Monitor.Wait(gate, 100);
            }

            if (pendingB != null)
            {
                returnMessage = new Message(null, b);
            }
            else
            {
                pendingB = b;

                if (!Monitor.Wait(gate, millisecondsTimeout))
                {
                    pendingB = null;
                    Monitor.Pulse(gate);
                    returnMessage = new Message(null, b);
                }
            }

            Monitor.Exit(gate);
        }
        else
        {
            returnMessage = new Message(null, b);
        }

        return returnMessage;
    }
}

What's happening here is basically the same as in the original code, but we're also waiting when there is already a pendingB object instead of just returning a 'B' message. This improves the amount of 'AB' messages that we can find, at a small performance cost.

It looks a bit messy, but it's mostly because I opted to use the more real-time friendly construct Monitor.TryTake instead of a raw lock. Also, having a single return statement is a neat trick to avoid deadlocks from accidentally returning before calling Monitor.Exit.

Fiddling with the various timeouts can improve performance at the cost of accuracy, or vice versa. 100ms was my initial guess for all, and it looks decent on my machine at least.


As a final note, in this implementation of WrapB we could change the lines

            if (pendingB != null)
            {
                Monitor.Wait(gate, 100);
            }

to

            while (pendingB != null)
            {
                Monitor.Wait(gate, 100);
            }

to get 100% accuracy, but it severely messes up the metrics from the test program since it synchronizes the 'B' events which obviously performs extremely poorly when there is a stream of only 'B' messages.

If I remove the t3 test, this runs about 5% faster than the original code while consistently finding 100 out of 100 'AB' messages. But then the runtime is of course no longer deterministic since we can't tell how many times we'll spin around the loop.

Edit:

Well, unless we do something like

            int spinCount = 0;

            while (pendingB != null && spinCount < 5)
            {
                spinCount++;
                Monitor.Wait(gate, 100);
            }

which will give us an upper bound on the wait time. It does solve the performance problems when we have a stream of only 'B' messages, and runs in about the same time as your original code while consistently finding 100 out of 100 'AB' messages.

share|improve this answer

Okay, so I tried to create a Fast A and AB and then a slow B. This means that my overall time is slower (mainly because of the b-only stream), but the combined time and a-only time is faster. Here are the results:

A's only: 00:00:00.3975499
Combine: 00:00:00.4234934
B's only: 00:00:02.0079422
Total: 00:00:02.8314751
0:  0
A:  700
B:  200
AB: 100
Generated A: 800, Sent A: 800
Generated B: 300, Sent B: 300

Here's the code:

    class MessageWrapper
    {
        object bMessageLock = new object();
        object pendingBLock = new object();
        int? pendingB;

        ManualResetEvent gateOpen = new ManualResetEvent(true); // Gate is open initially.


        private bool IsGateOpen()
        {
            return gateOpen.WaitOne(0);
        }

        private void OpenGate()
        {
            gateOpen.Set();
        }

        private void CloseGate()
        {
            gateOpen.Reset();
        }


        public Message WrapA(int a, int millisecondsTimeout)
        {
            // check if the gate is open. Use WaitOne(0) to return immediately.
            if (IsGateOpen())
            {
                return new Message(a, null);
            }
            else
            {
                // This extra lock is to make sure that we don't get stale b's.
                lock (pendingBLock)
                {
                    // and reopen the gate.
                    OpenGate();

                    // there is a waiting b
                    // Send combined message
                    var message = new Message(a, pendingB);

                    pendingB = null;

                    return message;
                }
            }
        }

        public Message WrapB(int b, int millisecondsTimeout)
        {

            // Remove this if you don't have overlapping B's
            var timespentInLock = Stopwatch.StartNew();

            lock (bMessageLock) // Only one B message can be sent at a time.... may need to fix this.
            {
                pendingB = b;

                // Close gate
                CloseGate();


                // Wait for the gate to be opened again (meaning that the message has been sent)
                if (timespentInLock.ElapsedMilliseconds < millisecondsTimeout && 
                    gateOpen.WaitOne(millisecondsTimeout - (int)timespentInLock.ElapsedMilliseconds)) 
                // If you don't have overlapping b's use this clause instead.
                //if (gateOpen.WaitOne(millisecondsTimeout)) 
                {
                    lock (pendingBLock)
                    {
                        // Gate was opened, so combined message was sent.
                        return null;
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    // Timeout expired, so send b-only message.
                    lock (pendingBLock)
                    {
                        // reopen gate.
                        OpenGate();
                        pendingB = null;
                        return new Message(null, b);
                    }
                }
            }
        }


    }

The main work is done my using a manual reset event. The idea is that if the gate is open, then you can send A's freely. When a 'b' arrives, you close the gate and force A to combine it. I must say that having a single pendingB field restricts this operation somewhat. Having only one variable means that only one thread can store it's b in pendingB. This is why I have the extra bMessageLock.

Also, access to this variable needs to be controlled, hence the pendingBLock.

There may still be bugs in this code, but as much as I test it, I still get all 100 messages combined.

Lastly, I included the check against the time that WrapB was waiting. Originally the WrapB's would just queue up taking a total of 200 seconds. If you have overlapping calls, then you can add the check. If you don't mind them queuing up, use the simpler code instead.

share|improve this answer

Well, my first ideea would be to have a semaphore that also handles priority, but maybe this post will give you more insight .Net Mutex Question

Basically the ideea would be to have some way to prioritize the 2 types of events so that events of type B can run as fast a possible if no events of type A are received.

I realise this might not be the right solution for you because of your third constraint that no sync mechanism other than Gate is available but i hope that I might point you in the right direction.

share|improve this answer
    
I already have sort of a queue in my code: pendingB is a queue with space for one item. B events cannot run as fast as A events, because B events wait for A events. But there is only one B event waiting. I just want to improve fairness. I don't see how your answer helps, but thanks for giving it a try. –  dtb Feb 20 '13 at 15:50
    
@dtb I was thinking about removing the wait on B events and rely on a queue that processes them, but that queue will always look to give priority to A if they have been received within a short timeframe of one another for instance, else process the B event that is next in queue. So in essence, move the locking mechanism one step up scope-wise and handle what event should be Wrapped and sent next based on the priority from a queue that each event will be put in. –  dutzu Feb 20 '13 at 15:52
    
Such a queue would require another thread that processes it, right? I don't have such another thread available. And I don't have space for an unbounded queue. It's tricky :-( –  dtb Feb 20 '13 at 15:58

Have you considered treating all Bs as if they're in a queue, so that if Bs come more frequently than As for a span, all of them share the wait, and so maintain their order?

An idea would be to change WrapB in the following way.

int sendingB=b;
bool flag=false;
lock (gate)
{
    if (pendingB == null)
    {
        pendingB = b;
        Monitor.Wait(gate, 100);
        if (pendingB != b) return null;
        pendingB = null;
    }
    else
    {
        sendingB = pendingB;
        pendingB = null;
        flag = true;
    }
}
if(flag)
{
    SendMessage(new Message(null,sendingB));
    return WrapB(b);
}
return new Message(null,sendingB);

That should be thread-safe, although technically wrapB might not terminate in a deterministic amount of time, as it's recursive, it does relinquish its lock.

share|improve this answer
    
If I'm not mistaken, this has the following problem: A thread calls WrapB and sees that there is already something pending. So it sends that and calls itself recursively (could also be a loop). While sending, another thread puts something into pendingB. So our thread sees that there is already something pending. So it sends that and calls itself recursively. And so on, ad infinitum. –  dtb Feb 20 '13 at 16:36
    
Ahh, good point, sorry. I changed it to my original idea, which had the unfortunate side effect of potentially allowing an (a,null) message while there really is a b pending. I thought I had a clever improvement... but I was wrong. –  Sconibulus Feb 20 '13 at 17:00
    
Still the same problem. It recurses infinitely if another thread puts something into pendingB every time the thread empties it. –  dtb Feb 20 '13 at 17:05
    
Oh... I wasn't really considering starvation as a problem, won't that exist anyway if the lock just happens to be given to another thread every time? I think the chances of recursion n times in my scenario is 1/2^n, so causing you to run out of space through the recursion itself seems incredibly unlikely. –  Sconibulus Feb 21 '13 at 22:00
    
Threads waiting for a lock are put into a queue, so I assume that this provides enough fairness if each thread doesn't hold the lock for too long. I tried your solution and easily got several hundred recursive calls when there is enough contention, leading to a measurably worse performance than my original code. –  dtb Feb 21 '13 at 22:06

This is a sketch of an approach that improves fairness - it will mean that all B-sends are subject to a delay of up to 100ms. I don't know however if it fits with your constraints.

  • In a global context, have a single MessageSender object of type IMessageSender
  • There are two implementations of IMessageSender, namely DefaultMessageSender, and BWrappingMessageSender (which stores a b value)

The message senders behaviour is as follows:

  • DefaultMessageSender on being asked to send an A: just sends it
  • DefaultMessageSender on being asked to send an B: switches the global MessageSender to being a new BWrappingMessageSender which knows the just-passed value b

  • BWrappingMessageSender on being asked to send an A: sends an AB with the passed a and its own b, and switches the global MessageSender to being a DefaultMessageSender

  • BWrappingMessageSender on being asked to send a B: sends a B with its own b, and switches the global MessageSender to being a new BWrappingMessageSender which knows the just-passed value b

What I haven't pinned down is a way that a newly-created BWrappingMessageSender knows to send a plain B 100ms after being created, if it hasn't in that time been told to do anything else.

share|improve this answer
    
Let BWrappingMessageSender start a timer when it's created. When it's asked to send an A, send A with pending B and stop the timer. When it's asked to send a B, send pending B and stop the timer and create BWrappingMessageSender with new B. When the timer fires, send pending B and switch back to DefaultMessageSender. The only problem is: I don't have a timer :-) –  dtb Feb 20 '13 at 17:17

Here is my solution after some experimentation:

  • If the single-element queue is empty, we take the spot.
  • If the spot is already taken, we politely nudge the occupant to move on, wait a bit and try again.
  • If someone is rude and hijacks the spot while we're waiting, we jump the queue and move on.

Code:

Message WrapA(int a, int millisecondsTimeout)
{
    bool lockTaken = false;
    int? b = null;

    try
    {
        Monitor.TryEnter(gate, millisecondsTimeout, ref lockTaken);
        if (lockTaken)
        {
            if (pendingB != null)
            {
                b = pendingB;
                pendingB = null;
                Monitor.Pulse(gate);
            }
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        if (lockTaken)
        {
            Monitor.Exit(gate);
        }
    }

    return new Message(a, b);
}

Message WrapB(int b, int millisecondsTimeout)
{
    bool lockTaken = false;

    try
    {
        TimeoutHelper timeout = new TimeoutHelper(millisecondsTimeout);
        Monitor.TryEnter(gate, timeout.RemainingTime(), ref lockTaken);
        if (lockTaken)
        {
            if (pendingB == null)
            {
                pendingB = b;
                Monitor.Wait(gate, timeout.RemainingTime());
                if (pendingB == null) return null;
                pendingB = null;
            }
            else
            {
                Monitor.Pulse(gate);
                try { }
                finally { lockTaken = false; Monitor.Exit(gate); }
                Thread.Sleep(1);
                Monitor.TryEnter(gate, timeout.RemainingTime(), ref lockTaken);
                if (lockTaken)
                {
                    if (pendingB == null)
                    {
                        pendingB = b;
                        Monitor.Wait(gate, timeout.RemainingTime());
                        if (pendingB == null) return null;
                        pendingB = null;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        if (lockTaken)
        {
            Monitor.Exit(gate);
        }
    }

    return new Message(null, b);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This solves the fairness problem, but has some room for improvement regarding efficiency. Can this be further improved so more B events are combined with A events when enough of both are generated? –  dtb Feb 22 '13 at 16:39
    
What's TimeoutHelper? –  Simon Mourier Feb 23 '13 at 12:50
    
A struct that remembers a deadline=now+timeout in its constructor and tells you how much time until the deadline is left. See github.com/SignalR/SignalR/blob/master/src/… or ssbwcf.svn.codeplex.com/svn/SsbTransportChannel/… –  dtb Feb 23 '13 at 13:04

Not sure it does what you want, but here is my proposition. It basically hands off any B message to A whenever possible, and checks the message has been sent after all:

class MessageWrapper
{
    object gate = new object();
    int? pendingB;

    public Message WrapA(int a, int millisecondsTimeout)
    {
        int? b;

        lock (gate)
        {
            b = pendingB;
            pendingB = null;
            Thread.Sleep(1); // yield. 1 seems the best value after some testing
        }

        return new Message(a, b);
    }

    public Message WrapB(int b, int millisecondsTimeout)
    {
        int? bb = b;

        lock (gate)
        {
            if (pendingB == null)
            {
                pendingB = b;
                bb = null;
            }
        }

        Thread.Sleep(3);

        if (bb == null)
        {
            lock (gate)
            {
                if (pendingB != null)
                {
                    bb = pendingB;
                    pendingB = null;
                }
            }
        }
        return new Message(null, bb);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for giving it a try! I've plugged it into the above test program, and it seems there is a small bug: one of the B events isn't sent. Apart from that, it's a great improvement (78 AB messages) over my original solution (43 AB messages) and the solution in my answer (32 AB messages out of 100 possible). –  dtb Feb 23 '13 at 13:22
    
Yes, I've seen that small bug. The last B just stays stored in pendingB and nobody ever gets it, but I suppose your real program just does that continuously, so that shouldn't be a problem. –  Simon Mourier Feb 23 '13 at 13:24
    
In my real program it's okay if a B event gets a bit delayed, but it's not okay if gets delayed too much, i.e., all events must be sent within a small, deterministic amount of time. So, with this bug, this solution unfortunately doesn't work for me. –  dtb Feb 23 '13 at 13:30
    
Well, it really depends on what's your real program is in the end, but I have updated my answer. –  Simon Mourier Feb 23 '13 at 14:59
2  
Thread.Sleep() will yield this thread execution, so indirectly transfer execution to any other thread waiting. If you put it in a lock, you can pass execution from a thread in a lock to another thread (even if it's also in a lock). –  Simon Mourier Feb 24 '13 at 10:17

Here is another attempt. The approach is to wait for the generation of an A event to attach to a B event, instead of waiting for a B event to get attached to an A event.

object gate = new object();
int? pendingA;

public Message WrapA(int a, int millisecondsTimeout)
{
    bool queued = false;

    lock (gate)
    {
        if (pendingA == null)
        {
            queued = true;
            pendingA = a;
            Monitor.Pulse(gate);
        }
    }

    if (queued)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(3);
        lock (gate)
        {
            if (pendingA == null)
                return null;

            a = pendingA.Value;
            pendingA = null;
        }
    }

    return new Message(a, null);
}

public Message WrapB(int b, int millisecondsTimeout)
{
    int? a;

    lock (gate)
    {
        if (pendingA == null)
            Monitor.Wait(gate, millisecondsTimeout);

        a = pendingA;
        pendingA = null;
    }

    return new Message(a, b);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Ok, but it takes 20 seconds total to complete :-). It's always a compromise between total time vs number of AB sent. You can wait forever and send 100% of possible AB. –  Simon Mourier Feb 24 '13 at 9:46

After three hours of trying, I managed to get the following results:

00:00:01.8577304
0:  0
A:  741
B:  241
AB: 59
Generated A: 800, Sent A: 800
Generated B: 300, Sent B: 300
Total: 1100

My method:

(1) Whenever there's a message B (from now called B) and there is not yet a B waiting, it will put it to the 'queue'. If there's no other packet within the given timeout, it will send the message. (2) When there is actually a B in the queue, it will bump off the first B in the queue and will send this message. This is to ensure fairness. The new B, that is being send will follow the same situation as situation 1 (it will be queued, and send within the given amount of time). (3) When there's a message A (from now called A), and there's no pending B, A will be sent immediately. No actual waiting is performed. (4) When sending A and there's a B in the queue, it will 'steal' it from the queue. Both messages are wrapped, and are sent together. Because B is waiting to be sent on the other thread, and A stole it, we need a null check. A will notify B, but B notices it has nothing to send. B will return null.

To accomplish this in code:

public class MessageWrapper
{
    readonly object _gate = new object();
    int? _pendingB;

    public Message WrapA(int a, int millisecondsTimeout)
    {
        int? currentB;

        lock (_gate)
        {
            currentB = _pendingB;
            _pendingB = null;

            Monitor.Pulse(_gate); // B stolen, get rid of waiting threads
        }

        return new Message(a, currentB);
    }

    public Message WrapB(int b, int millisecondsTimeout)
    {
        lock (_gate)
        {
            if (_pendingB != null)
            {
                var currentB = _pendingB;
                _pendingB = b;

                Monitor.Pulse(_gate); // release for fairness
                Monitor.Wait(_gate, millisecondsTimeout); // wait for fairness

                return new Message(null, currentB);
            }
            else
            {
                _pendingB = b;

                Monitor.Pulse(_gate); // release for fairness
                Monitor.Wait(_gate, millisecondsTimeout); // wait for A

                if (_pendingB == null) return null;

                var currentB = _pendingB;
                _pendingB = null;
                return new Message(null, currentB);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Three hours... wow. Thanks for putting so much effort into this! I'll copy it into my program and see how it performs. –  dtb Feb 23 '13 at 20:47
    
Anytime. I couldn't get the highlighting in the codeblock right. I guess it's only allowed to post one class? –  Caramiriel Feb 23 '13 at 20:48
    
Just indent the code; <pre> tags are not necessary. I removed a few bits of the code that are not relevant; it's fine if one of the methods just returns null instead of a message. –  dtb Feb 23 '13 at 20:49

Great problem. I really enjoyed spending some time on this. The solution that I used had 4 times the amount of matches that your original problem resulted with on my computer hardware.

Perhaps someone that is more knowledgeable than I am with Monitor and locks can improve this.

  1. Release another thread when a match is made instead of having that thread do a full sleep just to return null in the end. Perhaps this really is not that costly though. To solve this I introduced the AutoResetEvent, but for reasons that I do not understand, the AutoResetEvent is not acting as I intended and reduces the matches from 100 to 70.

  2. The final timeout of threads can be improved since once it times out it still needs to pass a contested lock.

It does fully fit the requirements:

  1. All processes will terminate within the specified period of time (The last lock may add a few cycles depending on how contested the lock is).
  2. Sending is outside of the locks.
  3. Synchronizes using gate
  4. No extra timers
  5. Preference and threads are treated equally

Original Questions Results:

  1. Time: 4.5 seconds
  2. A: 773
  3. B: 273
  4. AB: 27

This Classes Results:

  1. Time: 5.4 seconds
  2. A: 700
  3. B: 300
  4. AB: 100

    class MessageWrapper
    {
    object gate = new object();
    int EmptyThreadsToReleaseA = 0;
    int EmptyThreadsToReleaseB = 0;
    Queue<int> queueA = new Queue<int>();
    Queue<int> queueB = new Queue<int>();
    AutoResetEvent EmptyThreadEventA = new AutoResetEvent(false);
    AutoResetEvent EmptyThreadEventB = new AutoResetEvent(false);
    
    public Message WrapA(int a, int millisecondsTimeout)
    {
        lock (gate)
        {
            if (queueB.Count > 0)
            {
                Interlocked.Increment(ref EmptyThreadsToReleaseB);
                EmptyThreadEventB.Set();
                return new Message(a, queueB.Dequeue());
            }
            else
            {
                queueA.Enqueue(a);
            }
        }
    
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(millisecondsTimeout);
        //EmptyThreadEventA.WaitOne(millisecondsTimeout);
    
        lock (gate)
        {
            if (EmptyThreadsToReleaseA > 0)
            {
                Interlocked.Decrement(ref EmptyThreadsToReleaseA);
                return null;
            }
    
            return new Message(queueA.Dequeue(), null);
        }
    }
    
    public Message WrapB(int b, int millisecondsTimeout)
    {
        lock (gate)
        {
            if (queueA.Count > 0)
            {
                Interlocked.Increment(ref EmptyThreadsToReleaseA);
                EmptyThreadEventA.Set();
                return new Message(queueA.Dequeue(), b);
            }
            else
            {
                queueB.Enqueue(b);
            }
        }
    
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(millisecondsTimeout);
        //EmptyThreadEventB.WaitOne(millisecondsTimeout);
    
        lock (gate)
        {
            if (EmptyThreadsToReleaseB > 0)
            {
                Interlocked.Decrement(ref EmptyThreadsToReleaseB);
                return null;
            }
    
            return new Message(null, queueB.Dequeue());
        }
    }
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
The huge drawback on these 'wait' approaches, is you have to wait a long time for everything to complete. In this case, it's 1m35s. –  Simon Mourier Feb 24 '13 at 9:52
    
Perhaps you do not fully understand my comment? I'm just saying it takes 1m35s to complete. –  Simon Mourier Feb 24 '13 at 10:05
    
Sorry about the above message, it sounds crass, I was cut short before I was finished typing.... –  James Harmon Feb 24 '13 at 10:13
    
The time to complete was 7 seconds, not 1m35. As for the problem, to match data, there must be a specified amount of time. Otherwise there would never be enough time for the pieces of data to match. This amount of time is specified by the timeout. In the method above, the only time that the wrapper "waits" is when there is not matching data, and the amount of time that each independent piece of data waits is equal to the timeout. Also each wrappers type can have a different timeout, so if you would like only "MessageB" type to wait. Then specify the A timeout as 0. –  James Harmon Feb 24 '13 at 10:14
    
Please also note that matched pairs are immediately released and do not wait. –  James Harmon Feb 24 '13 at 10:15

I've tried to avoid unnecessary locks, especially for events of type A. Also I've made some changes in the logic of wrapper class. I've found that it would be more convenient to send messages directly from this class instead of just returning messages, that's because in my implementation a single call to SendB could potentially send two B messages. I've put some explaining comments in code

public class MessageWrapper
{
    private readonly object _gate = new object();
    private object _pendingB;

    public void SendA(int a, int millisecondsTimeout, Action<Message> send)
    {
        var b = Interlocked.Exchange<object>(ref _pendingB, null);

        send(new Message(a, (int?)b));

        // this code will just release any pending "assure that B was sent" threads.
        // but everything works fine even without it
        lock (_gate)
        {
            Monitor.PulseAll(_gate);
        }
    }

    public void SendB(int b, int millisecondsTimeout, Action<Message> send)
    {
        // needed for Interlocked to function properly and to be able to chack that exatly this b event was sent.
        var boxedB = (object)(int?)b;

        // excange currently pending B event with newly arrived one
        var enqueuedB = Interlocked.Exchange(ref _pendingB, boxedB);

        if (enqueuedB != null)
        {
            // if there was some pending B event then just send it.
            send(new Message(null, (int?)enqueuedB));
        }

        // now we have to wait up to millisecondsTimeout to ensure that our message B was sent
        lock (_gate)
        {
            // release any currently waiting threads.
            Monitor.PulseAll(_gate);

            if (Monitor.Wait(_gate, millisecondsTimeout))
            {
                // if we there pulsed, then we have nothing to do, as our event was already sent 
                return;
            }
        }

        // check whether our event is still pending 
        enqueuedB = Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _pendingB, null, boxedB);

        if (ReferenceEquals(enqueuedB, boxedB))
        {
            // if so, then just send it.
            send(new Message(null, (int?)enqueuedB));
        }
    }
}

Also I've maid some changes in your test class, one reason I've mentioned in comments - I've added synchronization event to all test threads for case when we testing AB clause. Also I've reduced number of simultaneously running threads from 500 in your version, to 20 (that all for AB clause). Still calls in all these threads are shifted by the number of thread (passed as parameter in thread Start method), so I hope test is still quite relevant.

public static class Program
{
    private static int _counter0 = 0;
    private static int _counterA = 0;
    private static int _counterB = 0;
    private static int _counterAb = 0;
    private static object _lastA;
    private static object _lastB;

    private static object _firstA;
    private static object _firstB;

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var wrapper = new MessageWrapper();
        var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

        var threadsCount = 10;
        var a0called = 40;

        // Only A events
        var t0 = Start(threadsCount, a0called, 7, 1000, wrapper.SendA);
        Join(t0);

        var aJointCalled = 40;
        var bJointCalled = 10;

        var syncEvent = new CountdownEvent(threadsCount + threadsCount);
        _firstA = null;
        _firstB = null;
        // A and B events
        var t1 = Start(threadsCount, aJointCalled, 7, 1000, wrapper.SendA, syncEvent);
        var t2 = Start(threadsCount, bJointCalled, 19, 1000, wrapper.SendB, syncEvent);
        Join(t1);
        Join(t2);
        var lastA = _lastA;
        var lastB = _lastB;

        var b0called = 20;

        // Only B events
        var t3 = Start(threadsCount, b0called, 7, 1000, wrapper.SendB);
        Join(t3);

        Console.WriteLine(sw.Elapsed);

        Console.WriteLine("0:  {0}", _counter0);
        Console.WriteLine("A:  {0}", _counterA);
        Console.WriteLine("B:  {0}", _counterB);
        Console.WriteLine("AB: {0}", _counterAb);

        Console.WriteLine(
            "Generated A: {0}, Sent A: {1}",
            (threadsCount * a0called) + (threadsCount * aJointCalled),
            _counterA + _counterAb);
        Console.WriteLine(
            "Generated B: {0}, Sent B: {1}",
            (threadsCount * bJointCalled) + (threadsCount * b0called),
            _counterB + _counterAb);

        Console.WriteLine("First A was sent on {0: MM:hh:ss ffff}", _firstA);
        Console.WriteLine("Last A was sent on {0: MM:hh:ss ffff}", lastA);
        Console.WriteLine("First B was sent on {0: MM:hh:ss ffff}", _firstB);
        Console.WriteLine("Last B was sent on {0: MM:hh:ss ffff}", lastB);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    private static void SendMessage(Message m)
    {
        if (m != null)
        {
            if (m.A != null)
            {
                if (m.B != null)
                {
                    Interlocked.Increment(ref _counterAb);
                }
                else
                {
                    Interlocked.Increment(ref _counterA);
                    Interlocked.Exchange(ref _lastA, DateTime.Now);
                    Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _firstA, DateTime.Now, null);
                }
            }
            else if (m.B != null)
            {
                Interlocked.Increment(ref _counterB);
                Interlocked.Exchange(ref _lastB, DateTime.Now);
                Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _firstB, DateTime.Now, null);
            }
            else
            {
                Interlocked.Increment(ref _counter0);
            }
        }
    }

    private static Thread[] Start(
        int threadCount, 
        int eventCount, 
        int eventInterval, 
        int wrapTimeout, 
        Action<int, int, Action<Message>> wrap,
        CountdownEvent syncEvent = null)
    {
        var threads = new Thread[threadCount];
        for (int i = 0; i < threadCount; i++)
        {
            threads[i] = new Thread(
                (p) =>
                    {
                        if (syncEvent != null)
                        {
                            syncEvent.Signal();
                            syncEvent.Wait();
                        }

                        Thread.Sleep((int)p);

                        for (int j = 0; j < eventCount; j++)
                        {
                            int k = (((int)p) * 1000) + j;
                            Thread.Sleep(eventInterval);
                            wrap(k, wrapTimeout, SendMessage);
                        }
                    });

            threads[i].Start(i);
        }

        return threads;
    }

    private static void Join(params Thread[] threads)
    {
        foreach (Thread t in threads)
        {
            t.Join();
        }
    }
}

P.S. Besides, thanks for really interesting question.

share|improve this answer

The limiting factor on this is really the constraints, particularly the requirement of only using gate for synchronization and the inability to spawn any other timer/threads/tasks, etc. This ultimately ties a programming solution to use the Monitor objects. E.g., Christoffer's solution although elegant, technically uses synchronization other than gate as it's wrapped within the internals of BlockingCollection. The other very innovative solution listed previously by afrischke also uses synchronization other than gate.

After a lot of experimentation and reading and research I have to say that I don't think this problem has a better (faster?) solution that meets the constraints exactly. I managed to get marginal performance gain using the following mechanism. It's not pretty but it meets the requirements and is about 1-5% faster on average at least on my machine;

object gate = new object();
ConcurrentDictionary<Guid, int> _bBag = new ConcurrentDictionary<Guid, int>();

public Message WrapA(int a, int millisecondsTimeout)
{
    Message message = null;
    int? b = null;
    lock (gate)
    {
        if (!_bBag.IsEmpty)
        {
            Guid key = _bBag.Keys.FirstOrDefault();
            int gotB = 0;
            if (_bBag.TryRemove(key, out gotB))
            {
                b = gotB;
                Monitor.PulseAll(gate);
            }
        }
    }

    message = new Message(a, b);
    return message;
}

public Message WrapB(int b, int millisecondsTimeout)
{
    Guid key = Guid.NewGuid();
    _bBag.TryAdd(key, b);
    lock (gate) { Monitor.Wait(gate, millisecondsTimeout); }
    int storedB = 0;
    if (_bBag.TryRemove(key, out storedB))
    {
        return new Message(null, b);
    }
    return null;    
}

Relaxing the gate requirement improves the speed by another little bit, particularly when not running in debug mode;

object gate = new object();
ManualResetEvent mre = new ManualResetEvent(false /*initialState*/);
ConcurrentDictionary<Guid, int> _bBag = new ConcurrentDictionary<Guid, int>();

public Message WrapA(int a, int millisecondsTimeout)
{
    Message message = null;
    int? b = null;
    lock (gate)
    {
        if (!_bBag.IsEmpty)
        {
            Guid key = _bBag.Keys.FirstOrDefault();
            int gotB = 0;
            if (_bBag.TryRemove(key, out gotB))
            {
                b = gotB;
                Monitor.PulseAll(gate);
            }
        }
    }

    message = new Message(a, b);
    return message;
}

public Message WrapB(int b, int millisecondsTimeout)
{
    Guid key = Guid.NewGuid();
    _bBag.TryAdd(key, b);
    mre.WaitOne(millisecondsTimeout);    // use a manual reset instead of Monitor
    int storedB = 0;
    if (_bBag.TryRemove(key, out storedB))
    {
        return new Message(null, b);
    }
    return null;
}

All in all, I'd say that you already have a very fine-tuned solution given the tight requirements. I actually hope I'm wrong and someone finds a better solution - it'll be very informative!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.