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I was wondering how can I add a newline character (i.e. /n or <br>) after X number of characters.

For example, let's say I have a perl variable $message ="aaaaabbbbbcccccdd". I want to add a newline character after every 5 characters to this variable. So when I print the variable in html it will display:

aaaaa 
bbbbb 
ccccc 
dd

What is the best way to do this? I was told to use substr or a count function, but I'm not sure how to go about it. Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

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9 Answers 9

up vote 3 down vote accepted

An even shorter option.

$m = "aaaaabbbbbcccccdd";
$m =~ s/(.{1,5})/$1\n/gs;
print $m;

Outputs:

aaaaa
bbbbb
ccccc
dd

Of course I think my version is the best of all presented up to now. ;)

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why (.{1,5}) and not (.{5})? –  Fluffy Sep 30 '09 at 14:39
1  
Because otherwise it won't capture leftover parts; eg, the dd will be left out because it doesn't match .{5}. –  Robert P Sep 30 '09 at 16:24
    
@roddick: you need to get the last group, which might not be five characters. –  brian d foy Sep 30 '09 at 16:30
    
thank you! this solution works for me. –  qdog Sep 30 '09 at 16:48
    
@RobertP - you can easily go with .{5} - .{1,5} is not necessary! –  user80168 Sep 30 '09 at 17:00

In perl, there are many ways to accomplish the same thing ;-)

One them might be:

$message = "aaaaabbbbbcccccdd";
$splitmessage = join ("\n",  ( $message =~ /.{1,5}/gs ));
print $splitmessage, "\n";

Output:

aaaaa
bbbbb
ccccc
dd
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Any reason for the downvote? –  Andre Miller Oct 1 '09 at 7:10

I heard that the most efficient way is to use unpack:

say for unpack "(A5)*", "012345678901234567890123456879"

Output:

01234
56789
01234
56789
01234
56879
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That's an interesting use of unpack. I like it. It's a lot cleaner than a regex version. –  Robert P Sep 30 '09 at 16:21
    
Except it doesn't add it to the variable. You'd need a slight change to make that work. –  Robert P Sep 30 '09 at 16:22
1  
if you want to add the <br>s to the variable, you must do something like $x = join " <br>\n", unpack '(A5)*', $x –  Massa Sep 30 '09 at 17:24

Building on Massa's answer, I'd do it like this:

$message = join("\n", unpack('(A5)*', $message ))

running it,

$ perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $message = "aaaaabbbbbcccccdd";

$message = join("\n", unpack("(A5)*", $message));
print $message;
^D
aaaaa
bbbbb
ccccc
dd

Replace "\n" with whatever you want to actually terminate each line with (eg, "\<br>\n" .)

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Since it appears you're trying to wrap text, I'd look at something like Text::Wrap

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The unpack method is probably the most efficient, if a bit obtuse. The regex method is probably the most Perlish way to do it. But since this is Perl, there is more than one way to do it, so here are a few other fun ways you could do this:

using List::MoreUtils::natatime ("n-at-a-time"). This method is of course wildly wasteful of memory, creating a scalar for every character in the string.

use List::MoreUtils qw(natatime);

my $in = "aaaaabbbbbcccccdd";
my $out = '';

my $it = natatime 5, split //, $in;
while(my @chars = $it->()) {
    $out .= $_ for @chars;
    $out .= "\n";
}

using the "replacement" argument of substr to splice in newlines, working from the end: (you have to work from the end because otherwise further offsets no longer line up after you start adding newlines; also working from the end means you only calculate length $in at loop start time without using an extra variable)

for(my $i = length($in) - length($in) % 5; $i; $i -= 5) {
    substr($in, $i, 0, "\n");
}

if you want to keep the input variable as is, you could pre-calculate all the offsets and extract them using substr

foreach (map $_ * 5, 0 .. int(length($in) / 5)) {
    $out .= substr($in, $_, 5) . "\n";
}

probably the most succinct way using substr is to use replacement and concatenate the return value:

$out .= substr($in, 0, 5, '') . "\n" while $in;
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substr($string, 0, 5);

Couple that with some variables:

$x = 0;
$newstring = '';
while(length($string)<$x){
    $newstring = $newstring + substr($string, $x, ($x+5)) + '\n';
    $x = $x + 5;
}
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1  
1. Addition is a mathematical operation in Perl, even on strings; you want the string concatenation operator '.'. 2. The 3rd argument to substr is the length of the substring, not the offset of the end of the substring. 3. Newline has to be in double quotes: "\n"; '\n' is the literal string \n. 4. The test in your while loop is backwards; it should be while(length($string)>$x). –  nohat Sep 30 '09 at 23:58

Just pass your string through this regexp:

=~ s/([^\n]{5})/$1\n/g

and you should be fine.

If what you really have is not a random string of random characters, but a text - you might want to use Text::Wrap module instead.

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1  
the {5} is incorrect; this will drop any leftover characters. –  Robert P Sep 30 '09 at 16:25
    
@RobertP - what do you mean by "drop"? echo "123456789" | perl -pe 's/([^\n]{5})/$1\n/g' shows correct result. –  user80168 Sep 30 '09 at 16:59
    
@RobertP - no, it does not drop the leftovers, because it does not match :-D –  Massa Sep 30 '09 at 17:33
    
It won't add the final \n if it doesn't match them; he wanted a new line at the end of every set of characters. –  Robert P Sep 30 '09 at 19:17
    
@RobertP: quote: "add a newline character after every 5 characters" - it doesn't say anything about adding new line character after last 2 or 3 characters if the number of characters is not divisible by 5. –  user80168 Sep 30 '09 at 19:23
echo 123456789abcd|perl -ne'print "$1\n" while s/(^.{5})//;print;'
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1  
See other ".{5}" regex answers; you will drop leftovers. –  Robert P Sep 30 '09 at 16:25
    
Bonus points for using a one-liner :) I'm always surprised at how many people don't know about perl -ne. (See "perldoc perlrun") –  Ether Sep 30 '09 at 16:28

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