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I've found something very strange. See this short code below.

import os

class Logger(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.pid = os.getpid()
        print "os: %s." %os

    def __del__(self):
        print "os: %s." %os

def temp_test_path():
    return "./[%d].log" %(os.getpid())

logger = Logger()

This is intended for illustrative purposes. It just prints the imported module os, on the construstion and destruction of a class (never mind the name Logger). However, when I run this, the module os seems to "disappear" to None in the class destructor. The following is the output.

os: <module 'os' from 'C:\Python27\lib\os.pyc'>.
os: None.

Where is said os: None. is my problem. It should be identical to the first output line. However, look back at the python code above, at the function temp_test_path(). If I alter the name of this function slightly, to say temp_test_pat(), and keep all of the rest of the code exactly the same, and run it, I get the expected output (below).

os: <module 'os' from 'C:\Python27\lib\os.pyc'>.
os: <module 'os' from 'C:\Python27\lib\os.pyc'>.

I can't find any explanation for this except that it's a bug. Can you? By the way I'm using Windows 7 64 bit.

share|improve this question
3  
Can you fix your indentation? – mgilson Feb 20 '13 at 15:51
    
Please check your indentation - are the class and def lines supposed to be at the same level? – thegrinner Feb 20 '13 at 15:52
    
@Ray -- I believe that I have fixed the indentation -- You should check it and see though. I noticed that there were spaces and tabs in there -- It might just be from putting the code in for StackOverflow, but you should run your script with python -t to check. – mgilson Feb 20 '13 at 15:56
3  
I'll let one of the real experts chip in, but I don't find this at all surprising -- the order in which the __del__ for objects is called at program end is arbitrary. (Can't remember if it's because a dictionary is being iterated over, but I wouldn't be surprised.) In fact, it's not even guaranteed by the language spec to be called: in PyPy, you won't even see the second os: line. – DSM Feb 20 '13 at 15:59
    
And if you add explicit del logger at the end of the script, the logger destructor is going to be called first. – Fenikso Feb 20 '13 at 16:02
up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you are relying on the interpreter shutdown to call your __del__ it could very well be that the os module has already been deleted before your __del__ gets called. Try explicitly doing a del logger in your code and sleep for a bit. This should show it clearly that the code functions as you expect.

I also want to link you to this note in the official documentation that __del__ is not guaranteed to be called in the CPython implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
Following what you kindly pointed out, isn't that a bit silly on Python's part? This and many other problems with Python are kind of dampening my enthusiasm for Python now. – Ray Feb 20 '13 at 16:11
    
@Ray: I suggest raising your concerns on the Python mailing list. Often discomfort is caused by thinking in your old programming language rather than in Python. They should be able to point out if this is the case. – Steven Rumbalski Feb 20 '13 at 16:17
    
That logger object that is automatically created when this module is imported (last line of my code) is required throughout the execution of my code. It has to be alive right until the very end of the program execution. How do I make sure that del(logger) is executed before this module dies? I can't think of a way right now... – Ray Feb 20 '13 at 16:18
2  
Aha! A very specific question. Post it as a new question and I think you'll get a good answer. – Steven Rumbalski Feb 20 '13 at 16:19

I've reproduced this. Interesting behavior for sure. One thing that you need to realize is that __del__ isn't guaranteed to even be called when the interpreter exits -- Also there is no specified order for finalizing objects at interpreter exit.

Since you're exiting the interpreter, there is no guarantee that os hasn't been deleted first. In this case, it seems that os is in fact being finalized before your Logger object. These things probably happen depending on the order in the globals dictionary.

If we just print the keys of the globals dictionary right before we exit:

for k in globals().keys():
    print k

you'll see:

temp_test_path
__builtins__
__file__
__package__
__name__
Logger
os
__doc__
logger

or:

logger
__builtins__
__file__
__package__
temp_test_pat
__name__
Logger
os
__doc__

Notice where your logger sits, particularly compared to where os sits in the list. With temp_test_pat, logger actually gets finalized First, so os is still bound to something meaningful. However, it gets finalize Last in the case where you use temp_test_path.

If you plan on having an object live until the interpreter is exiting, and you have some cleanup code that you want to run, you could always register a function to be run using atexit.register.

share|improve this answer

This is to be expected. From the The Python Language Reference:

Also, when del() is invoked in response to a module being deleted (e.g., when execution of the program is done), other globals referenced by the del() method may already have been deleted or in the process of being torn down (e.g. the import machinery shutting down).

in big red warning box :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @mavroprovato. Do you know if there is a way of ensuring that the del() method is called before any modules die? – Ray Feb 20 '13 at 16:23
    
I don't think there is... I think it is better to re import the module in the del method as Duncan suggested – mavroprovato Feb 20 '13 at 17:04

Others have given you the answer, it is undefined the order in which global variables (such as os, Logger and logger) are deleted from the module's namespace during shutdown.

However, if you want a workaround, just import os into the finaliser's local namespace:

def __del__(self):
    import os
    print "os: %s." %os

The os module will still be around at this point, it's just that you've lost your global reference to it.

share|improve this answer
    
The work-around seems to work, I guess I'll have to do that for now. Thanks Duncan. – Ray Feb 20 '13 at 17:08

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