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I'm converting some C# code to VB.NET. I have a simple dictionary-like data structure that contains name/value pairs. The value element is of type Object. My C# code looks like this

if(x.Value != null)
  // 1: Store x.Value in database
else
  // Sore DBNULL.Value in database

As expected, if x.Value happens to be a boolean of value false, code block 1 above executes.

However, the equivalent VB.NET code will fall through to the else block on a Boolean of False

If x.Value Is Not Nothing Then
  ' Store x.Value in database
Else
  ' We land here if x.Value is a Boolean with a value of False and incorrectly store DBNULL.Value in database
EndIF

VB apparently thinks a Boolean with a False value is equivalent to Nothing. I'll keep my comments about VB to myself, but is there a non-convoluted way, i.e. without using reflection, to work around this problem?

Edit: my original VB code was actually

If x.Value <> Nothing

That worked as described.

If x.Value IsNot Nothing

works correctly. Thanks Steve.

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Have you tried with if x.Value IsNot Nothing then – Steve Feb 20 '13 at 16:11
1  
FYI In VB, Nothing is not treated like null when compared with value types like boolean, like you'd expect in C#. Instead it is equal to that value type's default value, which is false for bool. – Keith Jun 12 '13 at 3:20

Use If x.Value Is DBNull.Value Then ...

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You must use IsNot with no space between the 'Is' and the 'Not' in vb. So your code will look like this :

If x.Value IsNot Nothing Then  
   ...do Stuff...
Else 
   ...do else stuff...
End IF
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