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I have a need to revision methods of business rules while keeping all previous versions accessible. The class they are contained in will be the same, but the content in each method will be different. I would prefer they have the same method signature. The caller will know the version it would like the execute. I would also prefer not to have _vX in the method name (like the example below). Is there a better way to do this? Something like an annotation on each method would be nice but in brief test that didn't seem possible to make the method unique enough.

public class SomeSpecificRule {
     public Response processRule_v1() {
     }
     public Response processRule_v2() {
     }
}

Edit : The reason for different methods is that the logic contained within the methods will likely be effective at different times (primary scenario), but we need to be able to run any version at any given time (secondary). method_v1 used for Dates x1-x2, and method_v2 from Dates x2-x3 will be common. However, the "which version should we use" given dates and other criteria logic I want keep separate though, to make the create of these classes and additional methods easy for other developers.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Without any other specifications, it sounds like you want to use an interface:

interface Rules {
    Response processRule();
}

class Rules_v1 implements Rules {
    public Response processRule() { ... }
}

class Rules_v2 implements Rules {
    public Response processRule() { ... }
}
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The only negatives I see with this are the number of files (~50 Rules, with 1-5 versions each - which may be acceptable) and having to use reflection or another factory class to instantiate the particular version needed (as opposed to just passing in a version number and using a switch). –  bobtheowl2 Feb 20 '13 at 16:47
    
@bobtheowl2: I'm not sure how you could avoid this complexity. At some point, somewhere in your code, you will somehow have to reference the correct combination of version and method! –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 20 '13 at 17:27
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It's not possible to version a method. A single signature can only appear once. You could have different classes that have the same method, and retrieve them via a factory, or some other method, but you can't do what you're asking.

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You may use separate classloaders for loading different versions of the same class... but be warned that working with classloaders is a real pain.

I think that a simple OOP approach (as suggested in other answers) could be more convenient.

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1  
I've been burned in the past playing with that black magic –  bobtheowl2 Feb 20 '13 at 16:40
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Or you could do versioning internally:

processRule(..., int Version = 0)
{
switch (Version)
   //etc
}

If you default Version == 0 as "current version", this might be relatively practical?

My argument is that what you call "business logic versions" is actually business logic itself, because you are explicitly using multiple versions because your business demands it.

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Ideally you would never have to do this, but if you do have to maintain methods that map to elements in some versioned wire interface, then represent versions as values in the language, and use a trampoline method to keep your API simple.

enum Version {
  V1,
  V2,
  V3,
  ;
}

public class ClassWithVersionedMethod {
  // Protected to allow overriding while preventing clients from calling
  // versioned methods explicitly, and to minimize clutter in the javadoc and
  // IDE-autocomplete menus.
  protected T methodV1(...) { ... }
  protected T methodV2(...) { ... }
  protected T methodV3(...) { ... }

  // Final to prevent overriding of unversioned method by accident.
  public final T method(Version v, ...) {
    switch (v) {
      case V1: return methodV1(...);
      case V2: return methodV2(...);
      case V3: return methodV3(...);
    }
    // Throw outside switch so that we get a compiler warning when
    // someone adds a member to Version.
    throw new AssertionError("Unsupported version " + v);
  }
}
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This is a tribute to Kajetan Abt's answers but upgarded.

    public void processRule(int version)
        {
        switch (Version){
          case 1:
            executeRule1();
            break;
          case 2:
            executeRule2();
            break;
        }

    }

   //executeRule1(), executeRule2() functions declarations here

I think this is better than creating new classes because you are trying to keep all previous versions of methods.

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You have a good point about keeping all the versions of logic in one place and effectively minimizing the number of files. –  bobtheowl2 Feb 20 '13 at 16:50
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Basically what said in other answer : Use an Interface.

public interface Car {
  public void start();
  public void drive();
}

How to apply: to totally keep version mess away from code, create a separate implementation of that Interface, per version.

public class CarV1 implements Car{
  public void drive(){}
  public void start(){}
}

public class CarV2 extends CarV1{
  @Override
  public void drive(){//--extra--}
}

public class CarNewV3 implements Car{
  public void drive(){//--new--}
  public void start(){//--new--}
}

You may create full implementation classes from scratch, or extend previous versions to add/override some functionality.

Finally, to wire it all together, that is, to serve appropriate versions, you can use:

Factory classes, they can provide implementations for a specific version. This class can check some parameters and choose to use a specific version.

public class CarFactory(){
  public static Car newCar(){
    if(year >= 2013){
      return new CarNewV3();
    }else if (year >= 2000){
      return new CarV2();
    }else{
      retrun new CarV1();
    }
  }
}

Or, Use some DI framework, this way, you write a little extra set-up class (module) where you figure out the best implementations to use at run time.

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Is there a way to get around the naming though without having _v1 and _v2 in the implementing classes? –  bobtheowl2 Feb 20 '13 at 16:37
    
@bobtheowl2 at least, the implementation classes must have different names. You can't access different logic, without a unique name referencing to it. Methods will have same name as you declare in the interface. –  S.D. Feb 20 '13 at 16:41
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