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So I am doing a small experiment for myself, a script to read the php errors' log file (with SplFileObject) and output it formatted on the browser.

I though it would be more logic to display it in reversed order (the latest errors on top). To use the "normal" order I would just display each line and call $file->next(); to move the pointer, but as I'm doing it the other way around, and there's not a prev() or previous() method as far as I know, the only way I found was using seek():

for($i = $lines_total - $start_at; $i > $lines_total - $start_at - $lines_to_get; $i--){
    $content->seek($i);
    $data = $content->current();
    if(empty($data)){
        continue;
    }
}

But this is incredibly slow (around 7 Secs for a 16mb file). If I do it in the normal order it's instant.

Do anyone knows any method? or what I'm trying to do is crazy? xD I'm just a designer forced to code, so I am not very familiarized with pointers and stuff like that.

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2 Answers 2

FROM PHP DOC

prev — Rewind the internal array pointer
prev() behaves just like next(), except it rewinds the internal array pointer one place instead of advancing it.

As you can see they only work with arrays not file pointer .... you can only use it like this

$file = new SplFileObject("log.txt", "r");
$file  = iterator_to_array($file);

echo current($file), PHP_EOL;
echo next($file), PHP_EOL;
echo prev($file), PHP_EOL;

If you want to move to the next line you can try using SplFileObject::ftell to get the previous position then use SplFileObject::fseek to implement your reverse ...

Example

$file = new ReverseableSplFileObject("log.txt", "r");
foreach ( $file as $c ) {
    echo $c, PHP_EOL;
}
echo $file->prev(), PHP_EOL;
echo $file->prev(), PHP_EOL;
echo $file->prev(), PHP_EOL;

Output

A
B
C
C
B
A

Modified class

class ReverseableSplFileObject extends SplFileObject {
    private $pos = array();

    function current() {
        return trim(parent::current());
    }

    function next() {
        $this->eof() or $this->pos[] = $this->ftell();
        return parent::next();
    }

    function prev() {
        if (empty($this->pos)) {
            $this->fseek(0);
        } else {
            $this->fseek(array_pop($this->pos));
        }
        return $this->current();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, although i've been researching a bit and people told me that doing it with arrays wouldn't be good with performance. I figured it out a way using fseek. Thank you for your help anyway! :D –  aleation Feb 21 '13 at 12:57
    
For performance fseek is faster than iterator .. see stackoverflow.com/a/13421745/1226894 –  Baba Feb 21 '13 at 14:15
up vote 0 down vote accepted

In case anybody encounters this problem in the future I came up with a quite simple solution:

//get to the last position of the file and get the pointer position.
$content->seek($content->getSize());
$lines_total = $content->key();
$byte = $content->ftell();

//all the line in the php error log starts like: [21-Feb-2013 22:34:53 UTC] so...
$pattern = '/^\[.*\]/';

for(...){
//get the current output to preg_match it
    $data = $content->current();

//go backward each time it doesnt match a line's start
    while ( preg_match( $pattern, $data ) === 0 ){
    $byte--;
    $content->fseek($byte);
    $data = $content->current();
    }

//go backward 1 more position to start the next loop
    $byte--;
    $content->fseek($byte);
}

Hope this helps someone someday xD

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