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I was wondering how I could accomplish the following: As example, I’ve a file containing the following:

monkey
donkey
chicken
horse

And I want to do a grep on it, so grep "horse\|donkey\|chicken", this will give me:

donkey
chicken
horse

But, what I actually want is the following:

horse
donkey
chicken

So, I want it in the order of my "regex". I checked the man page, but couldn’t find any parameter to do so. Is this possible (with grep)?

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That's the same as saying, I do grep "[A-Z]" so I want the output to be [A-Z]. Not going to happen. –  Mr Lister Feb 20 '13 at 17:02
1  
You could try piping to sort. Not exactly what you want, but it would give you some order at least. –  tjameson Feb 20 '13 at 17:07
    
@tjameson check out the example. he has his own sorting rule. –  Kent Feb 20 '13 at 17:15
    
Are you saying you want to search for them only occurring in a specific order or that they can occur in any order but you want to output them in a specific order? I assumed the former in my answer. –  Ed Morton Feb 21 '13 at 16:50

5 Answers 5

But grep will give you answers in order of appearance in the input. The order of the subexpressions in your regex has nothing to do with it. If you really want the answers in that order, you could grep the file three times:

for f in myfile
do
  grep horse $f
  grep donkey $f
  grep chicken $f
done
share|improve this answer
    
nice. but if there is a line having both donkey and horse, it would come twice. –  Kent Feb 20 '13 at 17:04
1  
If you want only to list the parts that matched, GNU grep has the "-o" option for that. If you want only to see whether a string matched and not how many times, you can put the whole thing in parentheses and pipe it through "uniq": (for f in myfile; do grep -o horse $f; grep -o donkey $f; grep -o chicken $f; done) | uniq. And at some early stage of elaborate shell scripts I generally move the whole thing into Perl or Python. –  minopret Feb 20 '13 at 17:09
    
when I said "it" would come twice, it means the line. so has nothing to do with -o option. if you pipe to uniq, it is wrong. since the output is not sorted. but I didn't mean your answer has problem. –  Kent Feb 20 '13 at 17:14
    
@Kent I'm not sure what problem you're posing but as far as I know it is different from Write Down's. –  minopret Feb 20 '13 at 17:22
    
I've now something like: for f in /proc/*/status do grep "^Threads" $f | awk '{print $2}' | tr '\n' ' ' grep "^Name" $f | awk '{print $2}' | tr '\n' ' ' grep "^Pid" $f | awk '{print $2}' done | sort -r -n | head -n 10 But I suppose this could be done a lot more efficient? –  Write Down Feb 20 '13 at 17:30

Try this solution using perl. It can fail in many ways and have serious limitations, like no more than 9 alternatives, or no | in the expression. That's because the script surround each word in parentheses and looks for a match in $1, $2, etc.

Content of script.pl:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use warnings;
use strict;

my (%matches, %words);

die qq|Usage: perl $0 <input-file> <regular-expression-PCRE>\n| unless @ARGV == 2;

my $re = pop;

## Assign an ordered number for each subexpression.
do {
    my $i = 0;
    %words = map { ++$i => $_ } split /\|/, $re;
};

## Surround each subexpression between parentheses to be able to select them
## later with $1, $2, etc.
$re =~ s/^/(/;
$re =~ s/$/)/;
$re =~ s/\|/)|(/g;

$re = qr/$re/;

## Process each line of the input file.
while ( <> ) { 
    chomp;

    ## If it matches any of the alternatives, search for it in any of the
    ## grouped expressions (limited to 9).
    if ( m/$re/o ) { 
        for my $i ( 1 .. 9 ) { 
            if ( eval '$' . $i ) { 
                $matches{ $i }++;
            }   
        }   
    }   
}

## Print them sorted.
for my $key ( sort keys %matches ) { 
    printf qq|%s\n|, $words{ $key } for ( 1 .. $matches{ $key } );
}

Assuming infile with data:

monkey
donkey
chicken
horse
dog
cat
chicken
horse

Run it like:

perl script.pl infile 'horse|donkey|chicken'

That yields:

horse
horse
donkey
chicken
chicken
share|improve this answer

You could also use awk for this. The following example collects matching patterns in the op array and outputs them in original order in the END rule:

pattern-ordered-grep.awk

BEGIN { split(patterns, p) }

{ 
  for(i=1; i<=length(p); i++)
    if($0 ~ p[i])
      op[p[i]] = $0
}

END {
  for(i=1; i<=length(p); i++)
    if(p[i] in op) 
      print op[p[i]]
}

Run it like this:

awk -v patterns='horse chicken donkey' -f pattern-ordered-grep.awk infile

Output:

horse
chicken
donkey

Note, if you only want to output the pattern and not the matching line, replace the final code line with print p[i].

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Just create an array of the strings you want and as you find each string, move on to check for the next element in the array:

$ cat tst.awk
BEGIN{ numStrings = split("horse donkey chicken",strings) }
$0 == strings[numFound+1] { numFound++ }
numFound == numStrings { print "Found them all!"; exit }

$ cat file2           
monkey
horse
donkey
chicken

$ awk -f tst.awk file2
Found them all!

$ cat file            
monkey
donkey
chicken
horse

$ awk -f tst.awk file
$
share|improve this answer

How about this?

cat file1.txt | grep -e horse -e donkey -e chicken | sort -r
horse
donkey
chicken
share|improve this answer
    
I think this wouldn't work with other combination, for example grep -e donkey -e horse -e chicken, which should output donkey before horse, and it doesn't work like that. –  Birei Feb 20 '13 at 20:42

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