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I want to know how do I use use loop when a variable for example . It should loop until a encounters a '*' if the stdin is from a file. As long it is getting value of a it should iterate.

    while(a!='*')
   {
         scanf("%d",&a);
         ...
           ....
          ....
         ....

      }
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1  
Are you sure you want "%d" for the format specifier for this? –  WhozCraig Feb 20 '13 at 17:25
    
Yea that's the problem a is an integer and * is not :| –  Learner Feb 20 '13 at 17:29
    
@Learner (and WhozCraig too) no, that is actually not a problem. char is an integral type as well. In fact, in the C standard library, most functions returning a character code return int. '*' is just fine for assigning to an integer (not in the case of scanf(), because there's no implicit type conversion through pointers, but when there is, it's correct). –  user529758 Feb 20 '13 at 17:30
    
@H2CO3 I realize that, but its the difference between storing a 0 and a '0'. Though now I want to see if %d actually parses a '*', 'cause I didn't think it did. hmjd's answer is what I was going toward. –  WhozCraig Feb 20 '13 at 17:31
    
@WhozCraig Yes, that's correct, "%d" won't make scanf() expect a non-integer character sequence. Just for clarification sake :) –  user529758 Feb 20 '13 at 17:32

3 Answers 3

How about:

char a;
while (scanf("%c", &a) == 1 && a != '*')
{
}

Changed format specifier to %c, passed in address of a and checked return value of scanf() to ensure a valid char was read.

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But I am taking int values in a before * , as soon as it reads '*' instead of any int value it should terminate –  Learner Feb 20 '13 at 17:39
    
@Learner You can't validate the char read is a '*' unless you actually read it, and "%d" will not do so. Thus the real problem I think you're facing. Trying to validate with "%d" will return 0 on anything not contributory to the int being read, not just an asterisk. –  WhozCraig Feb 20 '13 at 17:40

If you want to terminate immediately you read a '*', how about

for (;;) {
    scanf("%d", &a);
    if (a == '*') {
        break;
    }
    ....
}

Or, if '*' is the last value you should process, you could use

do {
    scanf("%d", &a);
    ....
} while (a != '*');

Note that I've taked the suggestion from WhozCraig and Armin and changed your scanf line to pass the address of a. If a is already a pointer type, the comparisons should change instead to dereference it - e.g. *a == '*'. (In the latter case, you'd also need to be sure to have allocated the memory a pointed to.)

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my answer going to be 1st one. +1 –  Arpit Feb 20 '13 at 17:27
1  
Are you sure it's scanf("%d",a) not scanf("%d",&a) –  user1944441 Feb 20 '13 at 17:27
    
@Armin I'd copied the scanf from the question. You're almost certainly correct that the question contains a typo however. Answer now updated. –  simonc Feb 20 '13 at 17:29
    
I got it , thanks!! , I edited the question as well –  Learner Feb 20 '13 at 17:32

Maybe you want to use a do { } while loop instead.

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but in do while it would check the condition in the end , so even if i enter m =* , it would run the code then check the condition –  Learner Feb 20 '13 at 17:25

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