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I have a getter/setter pair for an element in jaxb:

@XmlElementWrapper(name="requires", required=true) 
@XmlElement(name="equals", required=true)
List<MyObject> getMyObjects() {
    return this.myObject;
}
void setMyObjects(final MyObject... myObjects) {
    //call the regular method for setting the objects 
    //that does not have the required signature type
}

The thing is that the setter method is never getting called. I put a breakpoint on both the getter and setter, and the one by the getter is hit, but not the setter's.

I just found this question, but I don't fully understand the answer. myObjects is initialized at construction time, so it looks like it fits into Scenario 2. What happens in the unmarshalling process after the getter is called?

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The setter isn't used because there's no need. You can simply manipulate the list returned by the setter. See answer below... –  jahroy Feb 20 '13 at 20:12
    
@jahroy I rolled back your edit because I felt that you changed the question too much. I don't want to know how lists specifically work - I want to know in general why my approach didn't work. –  chama Feb 20 '13 at 20:49
    
What doesn't work about your approach? I'm not suggesting an alternate approach, I'm simply trying to describe how to use Lists in objects that are generated using JAXB. It isn't clear what you're asking. Of course your method named "setMyObjects" is not called. It is not a setter for your list: it takes an array as an argument in stead of a list! The point I'm trying to make is that JAXB does not use setters for Lists. My JAXB generated objects don't even have setters for fields that are lists. –  jahroy Feb 20 '13 at 21:18
1  
Your setter is never called, because the getter is used instead. In stead of explicitly setting the list, the code gets the list then adds elements to it. That is what my answer is trying to explain. Sorry if I'm not being clear. –  jahroy Feb 20 '13 at 21:21
1  
A setter for a list should take a list as an argument. Your method does not take a List as an argument so it is not a setter for your List field. –  jahroy Feb 20 '13 at 21:32

3 Answers 3

Your setter doesn't match up with the signature of your getter. Instead of:

void setMyObjects(final MyObject... myObjects)

You need

void setMyObjects(List <MyObject> myObjects)
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I tried that, but it didn't help. When I was attempting to step through the unmarshalling code, I noticed there was a variable that had the names of the correct getter and setter in the name, so I don't think that it wasn't finding the setter. –  chama Feb 20 '13 at 19:32
    
What problem do you have (error wise)? –  Perception Feb 20 '13 at 19:33
    
No error. It's just not calling the setter method. –  chama Feb 20 '13 at 19:33

This doesn't actually explain why JAXB works the way it does, but I was able to get my code to work the way I wanted it to. I don't really know why, but this is what I did:

@XmlElementWrapper(name="requires", required=true) 
@XmlElement(name="equals", required=true)
MyObject[] getMyObjects() { //myObjects is an ArrayList
    return this.myObjects.toArray(EMPTY_OBJECT_ARRAY);
}
void setMyObjects(final MyObject... myObjects) {
    //call the regular method for setting the objects 
    //that does not have the required signature type
}
share|improve this answer
1  
MyObject... is equivalent to MyObject[]. –  Blaise Doughan Feb 20 '13 at 21:52

You genearlly do not use the setter for list fields in JAXB objects.

In stead, you use the getter for the list and maniuplate the returned list.

Example JAXB object:

class JaxbExample {
    @XmlElement(name="stringList", required = true)
    private List<String> stringList;

    public List<String> getStringList() {
        return stringList;
    }
}

add three strings to stringList:

JaxbExample someObject = ...;

// add three Strings to stringList

someObject.getStringList().add("foo");
someObject.getStringList().add("bar");
someObject.getStringList().add("baz");

// now the list contains 3 new strings and there was
// no need to use a setter.

set stringList to an existing list:

JaxbExample someObject = ...;
List<String> someList = ...;

// set someObject's stringList to someList

someObject.getStringList().addAll(someList);

To clarify further...

We sometimes generate our JAXB Java classes from XML schema files (.XSD files) using the XJC utility.

When a generated class contains a List element, no setter method is generated for the List.

The following comment appears above the getter for each List:

/**
 * Gets the value of the stringList property.
 * 
 * <p>
 * This accessor method returns a reference to the live list,
 * not a snapshot. Therefore any modification you make to the
 * returned list will be present inside the JAXB object.
 * This is why there is not a <CODE>set</CODE> method for the stringList property.
 * 
 * <p>
 * For example, to add a new item, do as follows:
 * <pre>
 *    getStringList().add(newItem);
 * </pre>
 * 
 * 
 * <p>
 * Objects of the following type(s) are allowed in the list
 * {@link String }
 * 
 * 
 */

Hopefully that comment does a better job of explaining than I have!!

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This doesn't really answer my question. My method of doing this is a lot cleaner than yours - I don't need to have 2 objects for every object I want to marshal and unmarshal. Can you explain why you feel that this is a better approach? –  chama Feb 20 '13 at 20:51
    
@chama - I don't understand your comment at all. I'm not suggesting an approach, I'm simply expalaining how to use Lists with JAXB objects. Why do you feel I'm suggesting an approach that requires 2 objects? I think we have a communication issue here. –  jahroy Feb 20 '13 at 21:14
    
For every java object MyObject, the way you present it here, you need to also have a MyJaxb-type object. That's 2 objects for every 1 object that I really need... Maybe I just don't understand what buildJaxbObject() and buildFooObject() do –  chama Feb 20 '13 at 21:25
    
All I meant by buildJaxbObject() was that j is a MyJaxb object and we don't care where it came from. MyJaxb is meant to be an example class that represents an object that can be marshalled/unmarshalled to/from XML. Sorry about the confusion. The point of this answer is to suggest that there is no need to use a setter for a list field. In stead of "setting" the list, you operate on the list retrieved by invoking its getter. –  jahroy Feb 20 '13 at 21:28
    
I'm still not fully understanding. Where is this code sample located? In the unmarshalling code? –  chama Feb 20 '13 at 21:35

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