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It is common to represent status of an item in a GUI using the colors: red, yellow, green, to mean error, warning, and OK (or something equivalent). However, 7-10% of men have difficulty distinguishing between red and green because of color blindness.

So far I've looked at Color Scheme Designer which simulates how people with different color blindnesses would perceive a set of colors, but I'm interested in hearing how you have approached this problem and how successful it was.

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Just to note that "red-green colour blindness" does not necessarily mean a complete inability to tell red from green. I have some trouble distinguishing some deep greens from brown, for example. –  Matthew Wilson Sep 30 '09 at 15:05
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Found an interesting piece on designing for color-blindness.

One of the task-aways is never to rely solely on color. Always have some other indicator (text, icons) for a particular task.

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An example other than icons is the common usage to use bold typeface for unread messages in mail applications. –  mouviciel Sep 30 '09 at 15:21
    
I found comments in the "designing for color-blindness" interesting beyond the advice for using symbols. –  Phillip Ngan Sep 30 '09 at 19:37
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Don't depend on the colours. You could apply symbols too (e.g. green tick, yellow triangle, red hexagon) or use text labels.

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This is what we do. We have scores for projects that can be green (circle), yellow (square), or red (triangle). –  Berek Bryan Sep 30 '09 at 15:08
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Use 'common' symbolic icons as well as colour to represent statuses.

Might be useful: Where can one find free software icons / images?

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Many UI designers start with black-and-white designs, and later add color to accent or emphasize, but only after the black-and-white design meets all the design goals.

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Please forgive the necroposting, but if you absolutely must use color, I've found colorbrewer2.org very helpful - it has some nice pre-generated color palettes that they classify as "colorblind safe." Of course, as has been posted, avoid color when possible.

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Get any book about "accessibility" and you should have plenty of suggestions. They will more or less boil down to a simple principle: do not bind any information to color solely. That is, color should just be accompanying the information, which should never be conveyed by color only. I used Linux to develop one such application, and I used Compiz filters to simulate color blindness: very handy. As a side note, there are more types of color blindness out there, so pay attention to that too.

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The company I worked for hired a colour-blind Swing developer - me!

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That doesn't help much as there are many different types and degrees of colour blindness. –  Quentin Sep 30 '09 at 15:26
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Don't employ colour-blind operatives. ( Apparently the discrimination laws in the non-EU country we were selling the software in allowed this; YMMV )

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