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I have the following declaration:

calculate_sad_moods([]):-!.
calculate_sad_moods([X2|Rest2]) :- 
    (sad(X2),write(`One of our sad students is: `),write(X2),nl);
calculate_sad_moods(Rest2).

When I call it like this:

?- calculate_sad_moods([
    ivan, dragan, petkan, borislav, damyan, ani, petyr, ivo
]).

I end up with a very long list like this (It's ok, but it has dublicate records):

One of our sad students is: ivan
Yes.
One of our sad students is: dragan
Yes.
One of our sad students is: dragan
Yes.
One of our sad students is: petkan
Yes.
One of our sad students is: petkan
Yes.
One of our sad students is: borislav
Yes.
One of our sad students is: borislav
Yes.
One of our sad students is: damyan
Yes.
One of our sad students is: damyan
Yes.
One of our sad students is: damyan
Yes.
One of our sad students is: ani
Yes.
One of our sad students is: ani
Yes.
One of our sad students is: ani
Yes.
One of our sad students is: petyr
Yes.
One of our sad students is: petyr

When I change the declaration to:

calculate_sad_moods([]):-!.
calculate_sad_moods([X2|Rest2]) :- 
    write(`One of our sad students is: `),write(X2),nl,
calculate_sad_moods(Rest2).

I end up with this (It's not OK, because not everybody is sad, but it has no dublicate records):

One of our sad students is: ivan
One of our sad students is: dragan
One of our sad students is: petkan
One of our sad students is: borislav
One of our sad students is: damyan
One of our sad students is: ani
One of our sad students is: petyr
One of our sad students is: ivo

How can I output only the sad students and only once? I've tried adding brackets and several other tricks and still - Nothing. I have no other ideas left where to look.

P.S: Here's how the sad declaration looks like

[...]
sad(damyan) :- 
    (not(lovesExam(damyan,chemistry)),hasExam(damyan,chemistry));
    (not(lovesExam(damyan,biology),hasExam(damyan,biology)));
    (not(lovesExam(damyan,math),hasExam(damyan,math))).
sad(ani) :- 
    (not(lovesExam(ani,chemistry)),hasExam(ani,chemistry));
    (not(lovesExam(ani,biology),hasExam(ani,biology)));
    (not(lovesExam(ani,math),hasExam(ani,math))).
[...]

It'is still very obscure, but I'm still learning the basics...

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Since the only difference between the two programs is whether or not you call the sad function, it would probably be helpful to include it in your question. –  Tacroy Feb 20 '13 at 18:55
    
It looks like it is asking you every time whether the student is sad, could you possibly include your decleration of sad as well so we can see the full code for this example? –  Philip Graham Feb 20 '13 at 18:59
    
@Tacroy this is prolog, he's not exactly 'calling a function' but evaluating a predicate which is probably simply defined as a clause for each sad student; e.g. sad(ani). –  l4mpi Feb 20 '13 at 19:05
    
@l4mpi I know, but he used the verb "call" in his question so I figured he would be more likely to understand "call the function" over "evaluate the predicate", even if it's not strictly accurate. –  Tacroy Feb 20 '13 at 19:10
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

you placed the cut at useless place. Try instead of a cut to use if/then/else, it's far clearer.

calculate_sad_moods([]).
calculate_sad_moods([X2|Rest2]) :-
    (   sad(X2)
    ->  write('One of our sad students is: '),
        write(X2),
        nl
    ;   true),
    calculate_sad_moods(Rest2).

And you have some typo

...
    (not(lovesExam(damyan,chemistry)),hasExam(damyan,chemistry));
    (not(lovesExam(damyan,biology),hasExam(damyan,biology)));
...

note the seconde line should read

    (not(lovesExam(damyan,biology)),hasExam(damyan,biology));

You should use setof/3 if you want to collect sad students.

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Good answer as always... the reason why this works without printing duplicates is because the if/else construct does a cut after evaluating the predicate and thus stops the sad clause from backtracking, right? –  l4mpi Feb 20 '13 at 19:40
    
@l4mpi: yes. At first glance I wrote something similar to your code, but the cut seems such an intimidating concept for newcomers, I prefer avoid as much as possible –  CapelliC Feb 20 '13 at 21:05
    
It would probably be more accurate to say the if/else construct does not create a choice point to be backtracked into in the first place. In the original this is split into two clauses and multiple clauses always create a choice points. This is partly why when you see a conditional in the first clause you usually see its negation in the second clause. ("Reverse correctness") –  Daniel Lyons Feb 20 '13 at 21:07
    
@DanielLyons: true. I have by myself an habit to read the cut procedurally, because I learned Prolog on my old interpreter that doesn't have ->/2. –  CapelliC Feb 20 '13 at 21:09
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It's a bit unclear to me what you want to achieve with your predicate - should it print one student at a time and abort if the user accepts, or should it simply print out all sad students in the list? These would be two slightly different predicates.

As to why you're getting duplicates, I guess something in your sad predicate leads to backtracking, meaning it can be evaluated multiple times - use the trace functionality of the prolog interpreter to find out where the backtracking happens. While the best thing to do would be fixing the sad predicate to not backtrack, a workaround would be using a cut after the sad which prevents the backtracking:

calculate_sad_moods([]):-!.
calculate_sad_moods([X2|Rest2]) :- 
    (sad(X2), !, write(`One of our sad students is: `),
     write(X2), nl, calculate_sad_moods(Rest2));
    calculate_sad_moods(Rest2).

The cut means that we need to recurse into calculate_sad_moods after writing the output as we can't reach the or part of the clause anymore (it's been cut away too).

If you require the behaviour that the predicate evaluates to true after the first sad student found you could achieve this by using another ; before the backtracking in the sadness case:

calculate_sad_moods([X2|Rest2]) :- 
    (sad(X2), !, write(`One of our sad students is: `),
    write(X2), (nl; calculate_sad_moods(Rest2))); %only recurse if user says 'no'
    calculate_sad_moods(Rest2).

As a final note, the predicate name is very misleading as you don't actually calculate anything; maybe print_sad_students would be a more fitting name.

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