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I'm trying to generate a jar file that will contain an API SDK for our product, so our customers can create plugins and compile it against our API. All classes/interfaces that we provide as part of our API SDK jar are also included into our main product, so API developers won't need to include our API SDK jar into their plugin jar. Hence, I'm not worried about the size of our API SDK jar. However, I would like to make plugin developers' life easier and just provide one jar file that will contain both the compiled classes and the javadoc (so developers can see inline comments as part of the auto-complete feature as they develop).

We use Maven to compile and I added the following configuration to the API SDK pom.xml:

<build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
            <artifactId>maven-javadoc-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>2.7</version>
            <executions>
                <execution>
                    <id>attach-javadoc</id>
                    <goals>
                        <goal>jar</goal>
                    </goals>
                </execution>
            </executions>
        </plugin>
    </plugins>
</build>

This works, however this generates two jar files - one with compiled classes and one with javadoc. Instead I would like to generate just one jar file with everything.

We currently use Maven to compile this project, however we are free to use other build tools.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do this :

  • attach the javadoc goal to the prepare package
  • specify the javadoc output directory to target/classes

The jar plugin will create a jar with everything inside target/classes (including the generated javadocs)

    <build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
            <artifactId>maven-javadoc-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>2.7</version>
            <executions>
                <execution>
                    <id>attach-javadoc</id>
                    <phase>prepare-package</phase>
                    <goals>
                        <goal>javadoc</goal>
                    </goals>
                    <configuration>
                        <reportOutputDirectory>${project.build.directory}/classes/</reportOutputDirectory>
                    </configuration>
                </execution>
            </executions>
        </plugin>
    </plugins>
</build>
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Have you looked at the Assembly plugin?

The Assembly plugin can create a jar format assembly (which is actually a zip format assembly with a MANIFEST.MF file). You could specify both the classes directory and the apidocs directory in your assembly. stick a MANIFEST.MF in there, and you're done.

Fortunately, the javadoc:javadoc goal can be configured as part of the build lifecycle by configuring it in the <build> section of the pom.xml in the generate-sources phase. That means the generated JavaDocs should be available for the Assembly plugin.

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David W.: Thanks! Could you please give an example of how my pom.xml will look like (sorry - Maven is a new tool to me, so I'm still in my learning phase). –  Michael Narinsky Feb 21 '13 at 14:53
    
I'm not a developer, but a mere CM, and it's been a long time since I've created Maven pom.xml files. If I remember, there's a separate XML file for the Assembly description. I don't remember it being too difficult compared with the rest of Maven. Sonatype has probably the best Maven book out there on line. You can also buy a hard copy of it. –  David W. Feb 21 '13 at 16:04

Well, as a matter of fact things can actually be done in a simpler way.

Create a sources jar artifact using the maven-source-plugin:

<project>
  ...
  <build>
    <plugins>
      <plugin>
        <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
        <artifactId>maven-source-plugin</artifactId>
        <version>2.2.1</version>
        <executions>
          <execution>
            <id>attach-sources</id>
            <phase>verify</phase>
            <goals>
              <goal>jar-no-fork</goal>
            </goals>
          </execution>
        </executions>
      </plugin>
    </plugins>
  </build>
  ...
</project>

This way your project will deploy the sources to your artifact repository.

Then in your IDE's Maven configuration, you can simply turn on downloading of source artifacts, effectively meaning that your IDE will have javadocs, if, of course, you have proper comments in your code.

This way you can have properly separated artifacts as well.

Other than that, David W. and ben75's answers are also valid ways.

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