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Based on the following code, I need to find the minimum and maximum final values of x

x=1
i=1

cobegin

while (i<4)    while (i<4)
  begin          begin
    x=x*2          x=x*2
    i=i+1          i=i+1 
  end            end

coend

I figured that the minimum value x can have is 8, if the the loops are executed in order. And the maximum value x can have is 16, if the program enters one of the loops first, switches to the other loop and execute it until x=8 and i=4, and finishes the first loop, then x=16 and i=5. Is this correct? Am I missing any case where x could be either greater or lower?

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why do you have two identical while loops side by side? –  amphibient Feb 20 '13 at 19:15
    
Because they're executed concurrently. –  ratsimihah Feb 20 '13 at 19:15
    
Do we have to import another library for this, any links/tutorials please –  StrawhatLuffy Apr 11 at 9:54
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3 Answers

The answers you came up with are correct!

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It depends on whether i=i+1 and x=x*2 are atomic operations (meaning nothing can happen between the value of i is got and before it's set).

If not atomic:

Maximum: x = 64

x = 1
i = 1
x = 2 (from 1)
x = 4 (from 2)
i = 2 (from 1+2) // get i=1 for both
x = 8 (from 1)
x = 16 (from 2)
i = 3 (from 1+2) // get i=2 for both
x = 32 (from 1)
x = 64 (from 2)

Minimum: x = 4

x = 1
i = 1
x = 2 (from 1+2) // get x=1 for both
i = 2 (from 1)
i = 3 (from 2)
x = 4 (from 1)
i = 4 (from 2)

If atomic:

Maximum: x = 16

x = 1
i = 1
x = 2 (from 1)
x = 4 (from 2)
i = 2 (from 1)
i = 3 (from 2)
x = 8 (from 1)
x = 16 (from 2)
i = 4 (from 1)
i = 5 (from 2)

Minimum: x = 8

x = 1
i = 1
x = 2 (from 1)
x = 4 (from 2)
i = 2 (from 1)
i = 3 (from 2)
x = 8 (from 1)
i = 4 (from 2)
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I think if the instructions on each line are not considered atomic then worse things can happen - at least in theory.. –  Miky Dinescu Feb 20 '13 at 21:51
    
@MikyDinescu I remember this from a concurrency course I had, so I'm no expert and it's entirely possible that they are always atomic, but I thought I'd mention it (note that the answer isn't actually wrong regardless). Even if they aren't atomic, it might be that i+=1 is. –  Dukeling Feb 20 '13 at 21:58
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

It turns out the minimum was 2 and maximum 512 in the non-atomic case.

For x=2:

Process 2 (right loop) executes the [MOV r1, x] assembly instruction of line x=x*2, then switches to Process 1 (left loop). 
Process 1 loops until x=16 and i=4, then it exits.
Back to process 2, which executes [MUL r1, r1], [MOV x,r1], completing the line x=x*2. It then executes i++, yielding i=5, and exits the loop. 
The final value of x is 2.

For x=512:

Process 2 executes x=x*2 (x=2) and [MOV r1,i], then switches.
Process 1 loops, yielding (x=4,i=2), (x=8,i=3), (x=16,i=4), then switches.
Process 2 executes [inc r1] and [MOV i,r1]. Now i=2. Process 2 loops and executes x=x*2 (x=32), then [mov r1,i], and switches with i=2.
Process 1 loops, yielding (x=64,i=3), (x=128,i=4), then switches.
Process 2 executes [inc r1] and [MOV i,r1]. Now i=3. Process 2 loops and executes x=x*2 (x=256), then [mov r1,i], and switches.
Process 1 loops, yielding (x=512,i=4), then switches.
Process 2 executes [inc r1] and [MOV i,r1]. Now i=4.
Process 1 and 2 exit. x=512 and i=4.
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Does not seem possible, did you get an explanation for that? –  Dukeling Mar 15 '13 at 23:48
    
I added explanations for x=2 and x=512. –  ratsimihah Mar 16 '13 at 1:32
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