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I'm trying to execute this php program but I'm getting an unexpected output.

<?php
$abc;
function test(){
    $abc="world";
}
test();
echo "hello ".$abc;?>

Output : hello
Expected output : hello world

I'm new to php. Please can any one tell me what mistake I made in this code.
I know that if I give $abc="world" out side the scope of function test() it will work.
What should I do to assign a value to global variable from a function ?

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closed as too localized by PeeHaa, jeroen, MrCode, Audrius Meškauskas, Mario Feb 20 '13 at 21:32

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
1  
This is, in fact, the expected output –  Achrome Feb 20 '13 at 19:17
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can define $abc inside the class, and then access it using $this.

 <?php 
  class xyz {
   public $abc = '';
   function test(){
    $this->abc = "world";
  }
 }

$a = new xyz();
$a->test();
echo "hello ". $a->abc;
?>

Demo

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Using global variables is generally considered to be bad practice, but you can use the global keyword to do this.

<?php
$abc;
function test(){
    global $abc;
    $abc="world";
}
test();
echo "hello ".$abc;?>
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Could whoever downvoted this explain why please? This is the correct answer and I indicated that it is bad practice to rely on global variables. –  ChrisC Feb 20 '13 at 19:20
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$abc in test is local. If you want to access the global variable, you have to specify it, using global $abc inside your function.

see here

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You need to tell the PHP compiler you want to use the global $abc variable like so:

$abc;
function test() {
    global $abc;
    $abc="world";
}
test();

because the scope of variables in php is different to that of javascript, for example, because you may have crossed over from there.

any variable defined within the function is naturally private to that function in PHP.

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The $abc you're editing in test() is a different $abc than the global one. To fix your code the way you want it:

<?php
$abc;
function test(){
    global $abc;
    $abc="world";
}
test();
echo "hello ".$abc;
?>
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1  
Wow, someone went and downvoted all the global $abc answers? That's mature. –  DiMono Feb 20 '13 at 19:21
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