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I'm trying to implement the function that counts the number of words in a text file.

Here's my attempt so far.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
  FILE *fp;
  char word[1000];
  int count = 0, i;
  int *ptr = NULL;

  printf("Enter filename: ");
  scanf("%s", word);
  fp = fopen(word, "r");

  while(fscanf(fp, "%s", word) != EOF) //dynamically allocate contents of the file into word
    ptr = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int));
  for(i = 0; i < 4000; i++)
  {
    if(word[i] == ' ')
      count++;
  }
  printf("Total: %d", count);
  return 0;
}//main

When I use gcc- to compile, I get errors like "variable 'ptr' set but not used", but I thought I had used it when I dynamically allocated the contents of the file into word[80].

I think there's something gravely wrong with my word counter... it also returns 0 when there is clearly 200+ words. Can someone please enlighten me?

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while loop and malloc are broken and leaks memory. Don't cast malloc. word is 1000 chars, your for-loop loops 4000 times etc etc –  Fredrik Pihl Feb 20 '13 at 19:36
    
So how's your word counter? No feedback at all... –  LihO Feb 21 '13 at 14:26

7 Answers 7

hmm, but I thought I had used it when I dynamically allocated the contents of the file into word[80]?

No, you set it, again and again:

int *ptr = NULL;   // <-- pointer is set to null

while(fscanf(fp, "%s", word) != EOF) 
  ptr = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int)); // ptr is being set to some memory, again and again
                                    // also this could be a nice memory leak

So that's why you have gcc telling you "variable 'ptr' set but not used", because you don't use it.

So issues:

  1. ptr is set but not used
  2. assigning (sizeof int) bytes to a (int *)
  3. memory leak, constantly over writing ptr
  4. fscanf() returns the number of successful assignments, you should be using that instead of EOF
  5. word[] is 1000 in length, but you're looping to 4000
  6. by putting the fscanf() result in to "word" you're constantly overwriting what's in there
  7. You shouldn't cast the return of malloc()
  8. "%s" should really be "%999s" to limit the length of the input, but with 1000 I'd think you'd be safe anyway.

That's all I see off the top of my head, try fixing those and see where you get.

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Unfortunately, there are many things wrong with your program. For starters you have an index overrun on 'word' (it's allocated 1000 bytes, but your index runs to 4000).

Why are you allocating an integer each time you read a string in your while loop?

Your program should look more like this:

char buffer[1000];
int count = 0;
while(fscanf(fp, "%s", buffer) != EOF) count++;

EDIT: sorry, i thought you were reading characters, the above should now reflect the change.

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You've got a number of things wrong here. fscanf(fp, "%s", word) will grab a new word from the file and store it in the word buffer every time you call it. Your while loop doesn't have open/close braces, so for every word you read from the file you're going to allocate a new int*. After you've read everything from the file, you're going to go through the word buffer for the last word in the file and count the spaces, but you're iterating for 4000 instead of 1000. Try searching 'C++ word count' and I'm sure you'll be able to find a valid solution in less time than it took me to type this answer.

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Judging by your comment "dynamically allocate contents of the file into word" it seems you are a little bit confused about what your code actually does:

while(fscanf(fp, "%s", word) != EOF)
    ptr = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int));

actually calls fscanf repeatedly until the EOF is returned. And although each fscanf call reads the word from the file and stores it into the temporary buffer (word), the body of this loop makes no sense. It dynamically allocates the memory big enough to hold 1 integer and makes ptr to point to this memory (memory that has been allocated but never deallocated, which also yields a memory leak).

You could check whether the return value of fscanf is equal to 1 instead, since this function "returns the number of input items successfully matched and assigned". Your while loop should actually look like this:

while(fscanf(fp, "%s", word) == 1)
    count++;

Also note that your char word[1000]; defines an array of length 1000, but your for loop has 4000 iterations and you're trying to access elements out of array's bounds, which results in undefined behavior. Also the logic of your for loop seems to rather count the spaces (' ') stored in word. This loop is not useful for you at all, just get rid of it.

Hope this helps :)

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#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
  FILE *fp;
  char word[1000];
  int count = 0, i;
/*  (why. What are you doing with this?)
  int *ptr = NULL;
*/

  printf("Enter filename: ");
  scanf("%s", word);
  fp = fopen(word, "r");

  while(fscanf(fp, "%s", word) != EOF) //dynamically allocate contents of the file into     word
count++;
/*
    ptr = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int));
  for(i = 0; i < 4000; i++)
  {
    if(word[i] == ' ')
      count++;
  }
*/

  printf("Total: %d \n", count);   // added a newline, always nice to end that way
  return 0;
}//main
share|improve this answer
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  FILE *fp;
  int count = 0;
  char word[15], c;

  printf("Enter filename: ");
  scanf("%s", word);
  fp = fopen(word, "r");
  if(fp == NULL)
    return -1;

  while((c = fgetc(fp)) != EOF) {
    if(c == ' ')
      count++;
  }

  fclose(fp);
  printf("Total: %d", count+1);

  return 0;
}

This is really that simple.

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I modified yours just to show you what to take out. You can verify it works on Linux by running 'wc' against the file and getting the word count from the file.

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