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I need to know something about OOP in PHP.
Can I put functions in class methods or no ? Like this:

<?php
class test {
   function test1() {

      // do something

      function test1_1() {
         // something else
      }

   }
}
?>

And use it in this way: $test->test1->test1_1();

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No you cannot. That would just create a new function in the global namespace and will give you errors of trying to redeclare the function when called multiple times.

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Actually, it doesn't get created in the global namespace. It gets created in the method scope only. The function won't exist outside of that method call. But the message about errors is true. –  Colin M Feb 20 '13 at 20:34
    
No when I say global namespace I mean global namespace :) –  PeeHaa Feb 20 '13 at 20:35
    
Right, only after calling the method once. Okay, I suppose that's fair. –  Colin M Feb 20 '13 at 20:37
    
Hey don't blame me for PHP's stupid ways of doing things ;) –  PeeHaa Feb 20 '13 at 20:37
    
So...don't blame you for PHP? –  Colin M Feb 20 '13 at 20:39

You can put functions inside of methods (look up closures). However, you cannot call them this way.

An example of a closure would be

class MyClass {
    public function myFunction() {
        $closure = function($name) {
            print "Hello, " . $name . "!";
        };

        $closure("World");
    }
}
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You can use closures (>=PHP5.3) to store functions in variables.

For example:

class Test {

    public $test1_1;

    public function test1() {
        $this->test1_1 = function() {
            echo 'Hello World';
        };
    }

    public function __call($method, $args) {
        $closure = $this->$method;
        call_user_func_array($closure, $args);
    }
}

$test = new test();
$test->test1();
$test->test1_1();

Or you could create another object with the function you want and store that in Test.

class Test {
    public $test1;
    public function __construct(Test1 $test1) {
        $this->test1 = $test1;
    }
}

class Test1 {
    public function test1_1 {
        echo 'Hello World';
    }
}

$test1 = new Test1();
$test = new Test($test1);
$test->test1->test1_1();

I don't see what you would accomplish by writing a function within another function. You might as well write two functions.

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No you can't call test1_1 like that. When you define any variable or function in a function, that goes being local for only place that defined in.

Therefore, only this will work;

class test {
   function test1($x) {
      $test1_1 = function ($x) {
        return $x*2;
      };
      echo $test1_1($x) ."\n";
   }
}

// this will give 4
$test->test1(2);
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