Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a past few months I've played a lot with the TreeView and now I get to the UI freeze problem. It comes when you have large amount of the items and the data part for those Items are created very quickly but creating TreeViewItems and visualizing those (it must be done on UI thread) takes a time.

Let's take Shell browser and C:\Windows\System32 directory as an example. (I reworked http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/24237/A-Multi-Threaded-WPF-TreeView-Explorer solution for that.) This directory has ~2500 files and folders.

The DataItem and Visual loading are implemented in different threads but as the file and directory info are read quickly it gives no benefit. Application freezes when it creates TreeViewItems and makes those visible. I've tried:

  1. Set a different DispatcherPriorities for the UI thread when to load items, for example the window was interactive (I was able to move it) with DispatcherPriority.ContextIdle, but then items were loaded really slow..
  2. Create and visualize items in blocks, like 100 items per once, but hat no benefit, the UI thread still were freezing..

My goal is that the application would be interactive while loading those item's! At the moment I have only one idea how to solve this, to implement my own control which tracks window size, scrollbar position and loads only the items which are visable, but it's not so easy to do that and I'm not sure that at the end performance would be better.. :)

Maybe somebody has idea how to make application interactive while loading bunch of visual items?!

Code:

Complete Solution could be found there: http://www.speedyshare.com/hksN6/ShellBrowser.zip

Program:

public partial class DemoWindow
{
    public DemoWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        this.Loaded += DemoWindow_Loaded;
    }

    private readonly object _dummyNode = null;

    delegate void LoaderDelegate(TreeViewItem tviLoad, string strPath, DEL_GetItems actGetItems, AddSubItemDelegate actAddSubItem);       
    delegate void AddSubItemDelegate(TreeViewItem tviParent, IEnumerable<ItemToAdd> itemsToAdd);

    // Gets an IEnumerable for the items to load, in this sample it's either "GetFolders" or "GetDrives"
    // RUNS ON:  Background Thread
    delegate IEnumerable<ItemToAdd> DEL_GetItems(string strParent);

    void DemoWindow_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var tviRoot = new TreeViewItem();

        tviRoot.Header = "My Computer";
        tviRoot.Items.Add(_dummyNode);
        tviRoot.Expanded += OnRootExpanded;
        tviRoot.Collapsed += OnItemCollapsed;
        TreeViewItemProps.SetItemImageName(tviRoot, @"Images/Computer.png");

        foldersTree.Items.Add(tviRoot);
    }

    void OnRootExpanded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var treeViewItem = e.OriginalSource as TreeViewItem;

        StartItemLoading(treeViewItem, GetDrives, AddItem);

    }

    void OnItemCollapsed(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var treeViewItem = e.OriginalSource as TreeViewItem;

        if (treeViewItem != null)
        {
            treeViewItem.Items.Clear();
            treeViewItem.Items.Add(_dummyNode);
        }

    }

    void OnFolderExpanded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var tviSender = e.OriginalSource as TreeViewItem;

        e.Handled = true;
        StartItemLoading(tviSender, GetFilesAndFolders, AddItem);
    }

    void StartItemLoading(TreeViewItem tviSender, DEL_GetItems actGetItems, AddSubItemDelegate actAddSubItem)
    {
        tviSender.Items.Clear();

        LoaderDelegate actLoad = LoadSubItems;

        actLoad.BeginInvoke(tviSender, tviSender.Tag as string, actGetItems, actAddSubItem, ProcessAsyncCallback, actLoad);
    }

    void LoadSubItems(TreeViewItem tviParent, string strPath, DEL_GetItems actGetItems, AddSubItemDelegate actAddSubItem)
    {
            var itemsList = actGetItems(strPath).ToList();

            Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal, actAddSubItem, tviParent, itemsList);
    }



    // Runs on Background thread.
    IEnumerable<ItemToAdd> GetFilesAndFolders(string strParent)
    {
        var list = Directory.GetDirectories(strParent).Select(itemName => new ItemToAdd() {Path = itemName, TypeOfTheItem = ItemType.Directory}).ToList();

        list.AddRange(Directory.GetFiles(strParent).Select(itemName => new ItemToAdd() {Path = itemName, TypeOfTheItem = ItemType.File}));

        return list;
    }

    // Runs on Background thread.
    IEnumerable<ItemToAdd> GetDrives(string strParent)
    {
        return (Directory.GetLogicalDrives().Select(x => new ItemToAdd(){Path = x, TypeOfTheItem = ItemType.DiscDrive}));
    }

    void AddItem(TreeViewItem tviParent, IEnumerable<ItemToAdd> itemsToAdd)
    {
        string imgPath = "";

        foreach (ItemToAdd itemToAdd in itemsToAdd)
        {
            switch (itemToAdd.TypeOfTheItem)
            {
                case ItemType.File:
                    imgPath = @"Images/File.png";
                    break;
                case ItemType.Directory:
                    imgPath = @"Images/Folder.png";
                    break;
                case ItemType.DiscDrive:
                    imgPath = @"Images/DiskDrive.png";
                    break;
            }

            if (itemToAdd.TypeOfTheItem == ItemType.Directory || itemToAdd.TypeOfTheItem == ItemType.File)
                IntAddItem(tviParent, System.IO.Path.GetFileName(itemToAdd.Path), itemToAdd.Path, imgPath);
            else
                IntAddItem(tviParent, itemToAdd.Path, itemToAdd.Path, imgPath);                 
        }            
    }

    private void IntAddItem(TreeViewItem tviParent, string strName, string strTag, string strImageName)
    {
        var tviSubItem = new TreeViewItem();
        tviSubItem.Header = strName;
        tviSubItem.Tag = strTag;
        tviSubItem.Items.Add(_dummyNode);
        tviSubItem.Expanded += OnFolderExpanded;
        tviSubItem.Collapsed += OnItemCollapsed;

        TreeViewItemProps.SetItemImageName(tviSubItem, strImageName);

        tviParent.Items.Add(tviSubItem);
    }

    private void ProcessAsyncCallback(IAsyncResult iAR)
    {
        // Call end invoke on UI thread to process any exceptions, etc.
        Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherPriority.Normal, (Action)(() => ProcessEndInvoke(iAR)));
    }

    private void ProcessEndInvoke(IAsyncResult iAR)
    {
        try
        {
            var actInvoked = (LoaderDelegate)iAR.AsyncState;
            actInvoked.EndInvoke(iAR);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // Probably should check for useful inner exceptions
            MessageBox.Show(string.Format("Error in ProcessEndInvoke\r\nException:  {0}", ex.Message));
        }
    }

    private struct ItemToAdd
    {
        public string Path;
        public ItemType TypeOfTheItem;
    }

    private enum ItemType
    {
        File,
        Directory,
        DiscDrive
    }
}

public static class TreeViewItemProps
{
    public static string GetItemImageName(DependencyObject obj)
    {
        return (string)obj.GetValue(ItemImageNameProperty);
    }

    public static void SetItemImageName(DependencyObject obj, string value)
    {
        obj.SetValue(ItemImageNameProperty, value);
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty ItemImageNameProperty;

    static TreeViewItemProps()
    {
        ItemImageNameProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("ItemImageName", typeof(string), typeof(TreeViewItemProps), new UIPropertyMetadata(string.Empty));
    }
}

Xaml:

<Window x:Class="ThreadedWpfExplorer.DemoWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:local="clr-namespace:ThreadedWpfExplorer"
    Title="Threaded WPF Explorer" Height="840" Width="350" Icon="/ThreadedWpfExplorer;component/Images/Computer.png">
    <Grid>
        <TreeView x:Name="foldersTree">
            <TreeView.Resources>
                <Style TargetType="{x:Type TreeViewItem}">
                    <Setter Property="HeaderTemplate">
                        <Setter.Value>
                            <DataTemplate DataType="ContentPresenter">
                                <Grid>
                                    <StackPanel Name="spImg" Orientation="Horizontal">
                                        <Image Name="img"  
                                               Source="{Binding 
                                                           RelativeSource={RelativeSource 
                                                                            Mode=FindAncestor, 
                                                                            AncestorType={x:Type TreeViewItem}},
                                                                            Path=(local:TreeViewItemProps.ItemImageName)}" 
                                               Width="20" Height="20"  Stretch="Fill" VerticalAlignment="Center" />
                                        <TextBlock Text="{Binding}" Margin="5,0" VerticalAlignment="Center" />
                                    </StackPanel>
                                </Grid>

                            </DataTemplate>
                        </Setter.Value>
                    </Setter>
                </Style>
            </TreeView.Resources>
        </TreeView>
    </Grid>
</Window>

Alternative Loading items in blocks:

private const int rangeToAdd = 100;

void LoadSubItems(TreeViewItem tviParent, string strPath, DEL_GetItems actGetItems, AddSubItemDelegate actAddSubItem)
{
    var itemsList = actGetItems(strPath).ToList();


    int index;
    for (index = 0; (index + rangeToAdd) <= itemsList.Count && rangeToAdd <= itemsList.Count; index = index + rangeToAdd)
    {
        Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal, actAddSubItem, tviParent, itemsList.GetRange(index, rangeToAdd));
    }

    if (itemsList.Count < (index + rangeToAdd) || rangeToAdd > itemsList.Count)
    {
        var itemsLeftToAdd = itemsList.Count % rangeToAdd;

        Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal, actAddSubItem, tviParent, itemsList.GetRange((rangeToAdd > itemsList.Count) ? index : index - rangeToAdd, itemsLeftToAdd));
    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you're looking for is known as UI Virtualization and is supported by a number of different WPF controls. Regarding the TreeView in particular, see this article for details on how to turn on virtualization.

One major caveat is that in order to benefit from this feature, you need to use the ItemsSource property and provide items from a collection rather than adding items directly from your code. This is a good idea to do anyway, but it may require some restructuring to get it functional with your existing code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I was thinking somehow that VirtualizingStackPanel.IsVirtualizing="True" is in default TreeView behavior. –  TTT Feb 21 '13 at 13:39
    
Besides sometimes ItemControl with the property VirtualizingStackPanel.VirtualizationMode="Recycling" behavior is unexpected, because the item container is reused, but the properties of the container seems not always reset. In my case, the victim is IsExpanded property. Expanded event fired on dragging the scroll bar quickly. Example: speedyshare.com/H9BTV/ShellSolution.zip –  TTT Feb 21 '13 at 14:39

Why not just create your observable collection and bind to it from xaml?

Check out the MvvM design pattern and you just create a class, and point the xaml at it, in there, from the initialisation, create your list, and then tell the treeview to bind to that list, displaying properties of the each item in your list.

I know this is a little scant on info, but to do MvvM is really easy and just look through stackoverflow and you'll see examples.

You really don't need to call begininvoke on every item - and that's just not from an mvvm point of view - just bind to a list.

You can use indexed 'levels' to your objects too.

share|improve this answer

Another helpful technique is this regard, is Data Virtualization. There is a good article and sample project on CodeProject, that talks about Data Virtualization in WPF.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.