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I am writing a program to test Java's networking API (old io vs nio vs nio2).

I have a server which sends just two values:

  1. System.nanoTime()
  2. counter which counts the number messages sent.

The client receives this data, compares remote System.nanoTime() to the local timestamp to calculate latency and checks the counter to make sure no data was dropped.

Since this is just a test, the server and the client are running in the same JVM. 90% of the times data is transferred correctly; however, every once in a while the timestamp comes in completely wrong. It looks like it could be an over/underflow error, but I can't see how it could be introduced. Following is an example of an error:

ERROR: counter 3, remoteTS -8267580102784516096, localTS 155321716184402, diff 8267735424500700498

Notice that local timestamp 155321716184402 translates to a little after 7 pm. But the remote timestamp is simply negative! If you look in the code, I am not doing any fancy date math, there is no way it could be negative. I also don't see how I could get an overflow error. I thought it might be due to big vs small endian, but then every value would be wrong, not just some of them.

The code (which is extracted from a slightly bigger test) is as follows:

package networkioshootout;

import static java.lang.System.out;

import java.io.DataOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.net.InetAddress;
import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.net.UnknownHostException;
import java.nio.ByteBuffer;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.Random;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException;


public class DebugNetwork {
  private final static int SENDCOUNT = 100;
    private final static int PORT = 9000;
    private final static int TESTLOOP = 10;
    private final static Random rn = new Random();

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException, InterruptedException, ExecutionException {
        long currentNanos = System.nanoTime();
        long currentMillis = System.currentTimeMillis();
        Date now = new Date();
        System.out.println(String.format("Current date/time:%s, nanos:%s, millis:%s",
                now, currentNanos, currentMillis));

        //Server
        new Server().start();

        //Client
        for(int i=0; i< TESTLOOP; i++){
            final int DATASIZE = (1+rn.nextInt(99))*8;
            clientInputstream(DATASIZE);
        }
    }

    private static void clientInputstream(int bufferSize) throws IOException, UnknownHostException {
        final byte[] internalBuffer = new byte[bufferSize+16] ;
        final ByteBuffer longExtractor = ByteBuffer.allocate(16);

        int bytesReadSoFar = 0;
        long counter = 0;

        Socket client = new Socket(InetAddress.getLocalHost(), PORT);
        InputStream in = client.getInputStream();

        byte[] data = new byte[bufferSize];
        int size = 0;

        try{
            while(-1 != (size = in.read(data))){
                for(int i=0; i < size; i++){
                    internalBuffer[i+bytesReadSoFar] = data[i];
                }
                bytesReadSoFar += size;

                if(bytesReadSoFar >= 16){
                    int values = bytesReadSoFar/16;
                    int toRead = values;
                    int remainder = bytesReadSoFar % 16;

                    for(int i=0; i< toRead; i++){
                        int j = i * 16;

                        //long remoteTS = ByteBuffer.wrap(new byte[]{internalBuffer[j+0],internalBuffer[j+1],internalBuffer[j+2],internalBuffer[j+3],internalBuffer[j+4],internalBuffer[j+5],internalBuffer[j+6],internalBuffer[j+7]}).getLong();
                        //long remoteCounter = ByteBuffer.wrap(new byte[]{internalBuffer[j+8],internalBuffer[j+9],internalBuffer[j+10],internalBuffer[j+11],internalBuffer[j+12],internalBuffer[j+13],internalBuffer[j+14],internalBuffer[j+15]}).getLong();

                        //long remoteTS = data[0] | ((int)(data[1]) << 4) | ((int)(data[1]) << 8) | ((int)(data[1]) << 12) | ((int)(data[1]) << 16) | ((int)(data[1]) << 20) | ((int)(data[1]) << 24) ;

                        longExtractor.put(internalBuffer, j, 16);
                        longExtractor.flip();
                        long remoteTS = longExtractor.getLong();
                        long remoteCounter = longExtractor.getLong();
                        longExtractor.clear();

                        if(remoteCounter != counter){
                            String error = "ERROR: Expected remote counter to be "+counter+" but it was actually "+remoteCounter;
                            //System.out.println(error);
                            throw new RuntimeException(error);
                        }
                        counter++;

                        long localTS = System.nanoTime();
                        long latency = localTS - remoteTS;
                        if(Math.abs(latency) > 1200000000) {
                            out.println(String.format("ERROR: counter %s, remoteTS %s, localTS %s, diff %s",
                                    counter, remoteTS, localTS, latency));
                            continue;
                        }


                    }

                    //System.arraycopy(data, toRead, data, 0, remainder);
                    for(int i=0; i < remainder; i++){
                        internalBuffer[i] = internalBuffer[i+toRead];
                    }
                    bytesReadSoFar = remainder;
                }
            }
        }
        finally{
            client.close();
        }
    }

    static final class Server extends Thread{

        public void run(){
            try {
                startServer();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }

        private static void startServer() throws IOException {
            final ServerSocket server = new ServerSocket(PORT);

            //System.out.println("Server listening on port "+PORT);

            while(true){
                final Socket c1 = server.accept();
                c1.setTcpNoDelay(true);
                //System.out.println("Client connected");
                new Thread(new Runnable() {

                    @Override
                    public void run() {
                        long totalMsgs = 0;
                        long counter = 0;
                        DataOutputStream serverout;
                        try {
                            serverout = new DataOutputStream(c1.getOutputStream());
                            for(int i=0;i<SENDCOUNT;i++){ 
                                serverout.writeLong(System.nanoTime());
                                serverout.writeLong(counter);
                                totalMsgs++;
                                counter++;
                            }
                            //System.out.println("Sent bytes to client: "+total);
                        } catch (IOException e) {
                            out.println("Messages sent:"+totalMsgs+", current counter:"+counter);
                            e.printStackTrace();
                        }
                        finally{
                            //System.out.println("Client disconnected when counter was "+counter);
                            try { c1.close(); } catch (IOException e) { e.printStackTrace();}
                        }
                    }
                }).start();
            }
        }
    }

}

EDIT: Since there have been some comments about this, the actual program has clients connecting to the server over input stream, buffered stream, NIO, NIO2. This is a more complete (but out of date) version of the program: https://gist.github.com/falconair/4975243

I have yet to add datainput stream, experiment with socket options, etc. I'd like to get the data corruption issue resolved before I move further.

share|improve this question
    
What happens if bytesReadSoFar is 40? –  parsifal Feb 20 '13 at 21:05
    
You would find all this much easier to code with DataInputStream.readLong() rather than all this hand-coding, ByteBuffers, etc., and it would probably get rid of your bug(s) as well. –  EJP Feb 20 '13 at 21:14
    
@EJP using inputstream on the client is part of the test. I am also using buffered streams, selectors, async, etc., all of which has been removed for this question. The whole point is to compare the approaches :) –  Shahbaz Feb 20 '13 at 21:53
    
@parsifal if bytesReadSoFar is 40, dividing by 16 will set values (and toRead) to 2 and remainder to 8 (which means we can safely read 2 pairs of timestamp and counter and append remaining 8 bytes to internal buffer to consume later). At the end of the loop, the new value of bytesReadSoFar is set to remainder. –  Shahbaz Feb 20 '13 at 22:03
    
@Shahbaz But you aren't doing that. You're only using ByteBuffer in a very longwinded way in association with a Socket. You'd find it much easier to use a ByteBuffer in association with a SocketChannel as the designers of NIO intended. What you have now is just bad, pointless code. –  EJP Feb 20 '13 at 22:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The error is something to do with your use of data[] and internalBuffer[] and all that data shuffling. I don't see real clients being written using anything like this code. Anyone sane would just use a BufferedInputStream.

If you want to test the effect of different buffer sizes, use new DataInputStream(new BufferedInputStream(socket.getInputStream(), bufferSize)) and readLong() and get rid of data and internalBuffer and longExtractor altogether: they are just causing irrelevant problems.

The following works flawlessy:

private static void clientInputstream(int bufferSize) throws IOException, UnknownHostException
{
    long counter = 0;

    Socket client = new Socket(InetAddress.getLocalHost(), PORT);
    DataInputStream in = new DataInputStream(new BufferedInputStream(client.getInputStream(), bufferSize));

    try
    {
        for (;;)
        {
            long remoteTS = in.readLong();
            long remoteCounter = in.readLong();
            if (remoteCounter != counter)
            {
                String error = "ERROR: Expected remote counter to be " + counter + " but it was actually " + remoteCounter;
                //System.out.println(error);
                throw new RuntimeException(error);
            }
            counter++;

            long localTS = System.nanoTime();
            long latency = localTS - remoteTS;
            if (Math.abs(latency) > 1200000000)
            {
                out.println(String.format("ERROR: counter %s, remoteTS %s, localTS %s, diff %s",
                    counter, remoteTS, localTS, latency));
                continue;
            }
        }
    }
    catch (EOFException exc)
    {
        System.out.println("EOS");
    }
    finally
    {
        client.close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The bug was in the code at the bottom of the loop, when unused bytes are written to the internal buffer, I was shifting by toRead instead of toRead*16! Thanks for your detailed answer @EJP –  Shahbaz Feb 21 '13 at 2:47

The value returned by System.nanoTime() is specific to the running JVM. You should use System.currentTimeMillis() instead.

This method can only be used to measure elapsed time and is not related to any other notion of system or wall-clock time. The value returned represents nanoseconds since some fixed but arbitrary origin time (perhaps in the future, so values may be negative). The same origin is used by all invocations of this method in an instance of a Java virtual machine; other virtual machine instances are likely to use a different origin.

Edit:

Since you are running the test in the same JVM, the source of (this) error must be different from what is stated above (though you should consider using ´currentTimeMillis´ so that the values are comparable among different JVM).

I would recommend buffering the stream by using a BufferedInputStream, then reading and processing chunks of N (16?) bytes at a time.

 Socket client = new Socket(InetAddress.getLocalHost(), PORT);
 InputStream in = new BufferedInputStream(client.getInputStream());

 int length = 16, offset=0;     
 while (length>0) {
   int read = in.read(data,offset,length);
   if (read<0) ... //connection error
   offset+=read;
   length-=read;
 }
share|improve this answer
1  
As the OP said, the client and server are running in the same JVM. –  parsifal Feb 20 '13 at 21:07
    
@parsifal good point (though it would have been an issue after the code were deployed in a different JVM). –  Javier Feb 20 '13 at 21:17
    
@Javier this test actually has several implementations of clients, one of them is buffered input. I am testing various method of getting data from the server. –  Shahbaz Feb 20 '13 at 21:56
    
@SotiriosDelimanolis I am using nanoTime to measure elapsed time, difference between when the server called nanoTime before sending the data and when client called nanoTime after receiving the data. –  Shahbaz Feb 20 '13 at 22:08

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