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I painfully learned today that Nan and Inf have serious side issues. Did you know for example that sqrtf(NaN) is more than 15 times slower and sqrtf(-1) is 30 times slower (!!) than sqrtf(10.123132) - which is on its own a quite slow, floating point calculation!? You calculate rubbish, need ridiculous amounts of time for it and don't even realize it.

Ok, under Linux you can catch Nan and Inf bugs by throwing an exception when they occur:

#include <fenv.h> 
feenableexcept(FE_DIVBYZERO | FE_INVALID | FE_OVERFLOW);

How could you achieve that under Windows?

EDIT: the Benchmarking code:

float a,b;
a = 1.0 / 0;   //inf
a = -10;         //also nice
long c=0;
long time = SDL_GetTicks();

for (long i=1;i<=1000000;i++) {
   b=sqrt(a); 
}

ostringstream Help; Help << SDL_GetTicks()-time;

//RESULT SHEET
//sqrt(1): 21ms
//sqrt(10): 21ms
//sqrt(10.123): 20ms
//sqrt(-10);   390ms
//sqrt(+-NaN): 174ms
//sqrt(inf):  174
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1  
how did you measure that time? Maybe instead of hiding exception you should just prevent the occurence? –  Michał Szczygieł Feb 20 '13 at 21:49
1  
Use isinf() and isnan() to check the value? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh308344.aspx –  Violet Giraffe Feb 20 '13 at 21:50
3  
You turn on exceptions with _controlfp() –  Hans Passant Feb 20 '13 at 21:51
    
You do exactly the same as under Linux, unmask the exceptions. Surely a quick web search would have yielded that information. –  David Heffernan Feb 20 '13 at 21:52
1  
I can't reproduce your timings on my laptop (core i5, ubuntu, gcc). What hardware/OS are you using and how did you benchmark? –  rici Feb 20 '13 at 21:57
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you're using Visual Studio, you can turn on floating point exceptions using the /fp:except option. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/e7s85ffb.aspx.

The equivalent in code is #pragma float_control( except, on ). See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/45ec64h6(v=vs.110).aspx.

At runtime you can use something like _controlfp( _MCW_EM, _MCW_EM ). See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/e9b52ceh(v=vs.110).aspx.

share|improve this answer
    
I would like to use a basic editor (geany etc) - _controlfp sounds promising. Any library links needed for that? –  Kenobi Feb 21 '13 at 16:43
    
I believe it's part of the crt. Should be easy to try and see. –  Nate Hekman Feb 21 '13 at 17:11
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