Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm making a long and detailed post here, but I sincerely believe it's better to provide as much info up front. If any further clarification is needed, please ask. My heartfelt thanks to you for reading my query.

I'm using the book Pro ASP.NET MVC3 Framework by Adam Freeman and Steven Sanderson (Apress, Third Edition), and working through the Sports Store example beginning with Chapter VII. Note that the project entails the use of DI through the use of Ninject, and this is the main reason I wanted to take the time for this walkthrough. Another impressive contribution in this tutorial is the fact that it shows you how to develop an MVC 3 solution into separate projects the way it might be done in in a real world implementation--a thing I've found to be lacking in just about every other book I've ever looked at. (BTW I think the Apress books are just about the best ones out there, generally speaking.)

OK, so I've worked through Chapter 7 and well into Chapter 8, which means that I've successfully created and populated a database and retrieved its contents to appear in my List view. I've also gotten the formatting to work through the .css file. However, there's a catch here: When going through this the first time, I created the database from the IDE itself, which was no problem because there's only one small table (Products) to worry about. Everything was working fine. But then, for reasons I will shortly make clear, I decided to start over. This time, I wanted to follow through the same walkthrough with the exception that I would access the data by attaching to an existing .MDF file rather than creating a new DB from scratch as I coded the project. All this is to pave the way for me to use a similar pattern for my real project, for which I already have built a complex DB, replete with tables, FK relationships, views, functions--and data. I hardly need to say that I want to use my existing database in my "real" project, because recreating all that from scratch would be virtually impossible.

OK, now let's return to the Sports Store example. Try as I might, I cannot get the data from the database to my UI view. There are no error messages at compile time or run time, but instead of seeing the data in the List view, I see nothing but a blank page. Note that in this case it's correct in that there are no column headings or panes because there isn't any scaffolding here.

As far as I can see I have all the parts I need. Let's begin with the Ninject controller factory:

    NinjectControllerFactory : DefaultControllerFactory
    {
        private IKernel ninjectKernel;
        public NinjectControllerFactory()
        {
            ninjectKernel = new StandardKernel();
            AddBindings();
        }
        protected override 
        IController GetControllerInstance
        (RequestContext requestContext,   Type controllerType)
        {
             return controllerType == null ? null 
                   : (IController)ninjectKernel.Get(controllerType);
        }
        private void AddBindings()
        {
            //Had the mockup here before, which worked fine.
            ninjectKernel.Bind<IProductRepository>().To<SportsStore2.Domain.Concrete.EFProductRepository>();
        }   ...

    }

IProductRepository is as follows:

    namespace SportsStore2.Domain.Abstract
    {
        public interface IProductRepository
        {
            IQueryable<Product> Products { get; }
        }
    }

And EFProductRepository is implemented thus:

    namespace SportsStore2.Domain.Concrete
    {
        public class EFProductRepository:IProductRepository
        {

            private EFDbContext context = new EFDbContext();

            public IQueryable<Product> Products
            {
                get { return context.Products; }
            }

        }
    }

Why yes, of course EFDbContext is defined; viz the declaration:

   namespace SportsStore2.Domain.Concrete
   {
        class EFDbContext : DbContext
        {
             public DbSet<Product> Products { get; set; }
        }
   } 

And the connection string in Web.config file; this is supposed to wire up the context object definition with the actual database in the .MDF file, at least as I understand it.

    <connectionStrings>
        <add name="EFDbContext" 
            connectionString="Data Source=Owner-PC\SQLEXPRESS;Initial Catalog = SportsStore20130205; Integrated security=SSPI"
            providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />
    </connectionStrings>

Last and almost certainly least, I have the Product controller defined as follows. I say "least" because I'm almost positive the problem isn't here. In Debug mode, I can tell that the productRepository object isn't being populated. I can see some SQL code in there which is supposed to be run, or have been run by this point. But the invocation of repository.Products returns nothing.

namespace SportsStore2.WebUI.Controllers { public class ProductController : Controller { private IProductRepository repository;

    public ProductController(IProductRepository productRepository)
    {
        repository = productRepository;
    }

    public ViewResult List()
    {
        return View(repository.Products);
    }

    public ViewResult Count() 
    {
        int counter = repository.Products.Count();
        return View(repository.Products.Count());
    }
}

}

    namespace SportsStore2.WebUI.Controllers
    {
         public class ProductController : Controller
         {
             private IProductRepository repository;

             public ProductController(IProductRepository productRepository)
             {
                 repository = productRepository;
             } 

             public ViewResult List()
             {
                 return View(repository.Products);
             }

        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Change your connection string name to `SportsStore2.Domain.Concrete.EfDbContext". In order to use the convention naming method (where you don't specify the connection string name) you need to include the full namespace. Also, using a ControllerFactory for Ninject is way obsolete, use Ninject.MVC3 instead and configure in NinjectWebCommon.cs –  Erik Funkenbusch Feb 20 '13 at 23:25
    
Thanks for replying so quickly. I assume you mean I should make this change in the web.config file; I'll go ahead and try it that way. –  user382459 Feb 21 '13 at 4:33
    
Sadly, no joy from changing the connection string name. Is Ninject.MVC3 something that would simplify the dependency handling here overall? I should probably point out that I am using DI to allow for flexibility of implementation--e.g. an end client would be able to swap in their own .dll for one of mine if they wished, if this were to be a real-world production system. (Fortunately it's not, but I do need to demonstrate that this degree of modifiability can be supported.) –  user382459 Feb 21 '13 at 7:58
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.