Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a 'C' executable c_out and it can be executed from two different scripts scriptA and scriptB. Is there a way I can find out in c_out which script executed me? There are no arguments passed to c_out but I want to find out who executed c_out.

share|improve this question
    
Not directly. If you can change somethings, maybe you can do what you want: include command line parameters (c_out scriptB) or use environment variables ... –  pmg Feb 20 '13 at 23:33
    
You've got some reasonable (if Linux-oriented) answers, but a deeper question is: why does your executable care? I suspect the design is flawed if it must do different things depending on which script invoked it. What happens when scriptC executes it? –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 21 '13 at 0:41

3 Answers 3

Here's a quick way to determine this on Linux.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
        int ppid = 0;
        char syscmd[32];
        ppid = getppid();
        sprintf(syscmd,"cat /proc/%d/cmdline\n",ppid);
        system(syscmd);
        return 0;
}

~

share|improve this answer
    
this deserves some explanation... +1 however –  CharlesB Feb 21 '13 at 0:15
    
It would be as easy to open the file (under /proc) and read it; possibly more useful than using system. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 21 '13 at 0:35
    
@CharlesB The assumption is that the process can get its parents PID and derive a name/cmdline from that. This is not 100%, but will work in most cases. There is probably a better solution. –  Peter L. Feb 21 '13 at 1:36
    
@Jonathan Yes, it is better to read /proc/PID/cmdline directly, but this sample just shows how it might work. –  Peter L. Feb 21 '13 at 1:38

Reading /proc/../cmdline only works, if the script is run it its own bash process.

If it was included with source script, it will print the calling script/shell.

The actual script is stored in the bash variable BASH_SOURCE.

It is not so easy to read from a c program, but you can use gdb to do it.

E.g, on amd64 this always prints the calling script (even for sourced ones):

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int ppid = 0;
    char syscmd[256];
    ppid = getppid();
    sprintf(syscmd,"gdb --batch -ex \"attach %d\" -ex 'print *(*((*((char****)find_variable(\"BASH_SOURCE\") + 1) + 8) + 2) + 1)'\n",ppid);
    system(syscmd);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Since it is a C executable that is being executed, there's no danger of it being dotted or sourced, is there? –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 21 '13 at 0:33
    
@JonathanLeffler The script calling the executable could have been sourced. E.g. when script calls the program and you type source script in the bash prompt –  BeniBela Feb 21 '13 at 0:35
    
You're right, I suppose, on a technicality; though I'd be willing to argue that the command that sourced the script is the one that executed it, regardless of the fact that it was executed in a sourced script. How often do you source a script other than to set environment variables? I know that I essentially never use source (at all, but I use . instead) except to set environment. YMMV, I guess. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 21 '13 at 0:38
    
@JonathanLeffler: Actually bash can source it on its own. At least, if the script is exectuable and does not have a shebang, but just a single line with the program call, it is run in the same process. –  BeniBela Feb 21 '13 at 0:41

You can try to find out the executable path of your parent process but that is not a reliable solution because parent process might terminate before the child process and then your C process will be transferred to init in *nixes. Or the parent might use exec to substitute itself with child and then there will be no reliable way to find it out.

Depending on what problem you are trying to solve the cleanest way might be changing your C program to behave differently not depending on who is executing it but on the environment or command line arguments.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.