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I have a Container type that is covariant on its type parameter.

  class Container[+T](val map: Map[Int, T] = Map.empty[Int, T]){
    def add[B >: T](i: Int, b: B) = new Container(map + (i->b))
//    lazy val freqs = (map.toList groupBy (x=>x._2) mapValues(_.size))
//    lazy val uniq = map.toSet
      lazy val keySet = map.keySet
  }

I was thinking that the reason I get errors trying to compile with freqs or uniq uncommented has to do with what Mr. Spiewak wrote in his answer here, that Sets and Maps are invariant in the relevant parameter.

Why is Scala's immutable Set not covariant in its type?

However I was a bit surprised to find that it was no problem to include keySet which does return a Set whose type is T.

I was able to work around this partially by writing

lazy val freqs:Map[_ <: Any, Int] = 
  (map.toList groupBy (x=>x._2) mapValues(_.size))

But this is less than ideal because the key type comes out as Any. I'd like to be able to also say

lazy val uniqueValues = freqs.keySet

And get a Set[T] instead of a Set[Any]

  • How can I best implement freqs as above?
  • How does keySet return a Set[T] when other methods fail?
  • How can I get a Set[T] of unique values in the Map?
  • Why does _ <: Any allow this to compile?

Thanks!

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Right off it seems the Map is backward. Do know the frequencies are all distinct? –  Randall Schulz Feb 20 '13 at 23:54
    
There are two maps mentioned, and neither is backward. The first Map is the Container parameter, a Map[Int, T]: each Int is an alias for a T. The second map is the return type of freqs, Map[T, Int] which is a count of the number of aliases for each T. –  scalapeno Feb 21 '13 at 0:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

However I was a bit surprised to find that it was no problem to include keySet which does return a Set whose type is T

No it does not. map is of type Map[Int, T], so while its values are of type T, its keys are of type Int. So keySet here is of type Set[Int] (and not Set[T]) which means that there is no problem with T's covariance.

How does keySet return a Set[T] when other methods fail?

It does not (see above)

How can I get a Set[T] of unique values in the Map?

Given that Set is invariant in its type parameter, there is simply no way to have any val of type Set[T] inside Container, unless you mark these vals as private[this], or make Container invariant in T.

How can I best implement freqs as above?

Same problem as above.

Why does _ <: Any allow this to compile?

Because when explicitly stating that freqis of type Map[_ <: Any, Int] you removed any dependence to T, thus there is no problem as far as variance is concerned. If you don't explictly state the type of freq, scala (correctly) infers the type as Map[T, Int], which does depend on T in an invariant position.

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Thanks for the suggestion but adding private[this] doesn't seem to have helped. class Container[+T](val map: Map[Int, T] = Map.empty[Int, T]){ def add[B >: T](i: Int, b: B) = new Container(map + (i->b)); private[this] lazy val freqs = (map.toList groupBy (x=>x._2) mapValues(_.size)) } –  scalapeno Feb 21 '13 at 0:32
    
Which version of scala are you using, and can you try with a more recent one? –  Régis Jean-Gilles Feb 21 '13 at 0:47
    
I checked it, and indeed it does work in scala 2.10, but not in scala 2.9. Apparently in scala 2.9 having a private[this] val of type T works, but if you change the type to a class that is invariant in T (as opposed to simply being T) such as Set[T], it does not work anymore. This looks like a scala 2.9 bug to me. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Feb 21 '13 at 8:15

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