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I have a 3x168 dataframe in R. Each row has three columns - Day, Hour, and value. The day and hour corresponds to day of the week, the hour column corresponds to the hour on that day, and the value corresponds to the value with which I am concerned.

I am hoping to transform this data such that it exists in a 24x7 matrix, with a row (or column) corresponding to a particular day, and a column (or row) corresponding to a particular hour.

What is the most efficient way to do this in R? I've been able to throw together some messy strings of commands to get something close, but I have a feeling there is a very efficient solution.

Example starting data:

> print(data)
    weekday hour       value
1         M    1  1.11569683
2         M    2 -0.44550495
3         M    3 -0.82566259
4         M    4 -0.81427790
5         M    5  0.08277568
6         M    6  1.36057839
...
156      SU   12  0.12842608
157      SU   13  0.44697186
158      SU   14  0.86549961
159      SU   15 -0.22333317
160      SU   16  1.75955163
161      SU   17 -0.28904472
162      SU   18 -0.78826607
163      SU   19 -0.78520233
164      SU   20 -0.19301032
165      SU   21  0.65281161
166      SU   22  0.37993619
167      SU   23 -1.58806896
168      SU   24 -0.26725907

I'd hope to get something of the type:

   M          .... SU
1  1.11569683
2  -0.44550495
3  -0.82566259
4  -0.81427790
5
6
. 
.
.
19
20
21                 0.65281161
22                 0.37993619
23                -1.58806896
24                -0.26725907

You can get some actual sample data this way:

weekday <- rep(c("M","T","W","TH","F","SA","SU"),each=24)
hour <- rep(1:24,7)
value <- rnorm(24*7)
data <- data.frame(weekday=weekday, hour=hour, value=value)

Thanks!

share|improve this question
3  
Show us a sample data at least, please. –  Arun Feb 20 '13 at 23:39
    
Added some sample data -- thanks for the feedback. –  araspion Feb 21 '13 at 0:06
    
You're still a little unclear about what your output should be. In your notes, you said you wanted a 24x7 matrix, but your example output would be a 168x7 matrix. –  N8TRO Feb 21 '13 at 0:10
    
My mistake -- typo. Fixed this. –  araspion Feb 21 '13 at 0:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is pretty trivial with the reshape2 package:

# Sample data - please include some with your next question!
x <- data.frame(day = c(rep("Sunday", 24),
                        rep("Monday", 24),
                        rep("Tuesday", 24),
                        rep("Wednesday", 24),
                        rep("Thursday", 24),
                        rep("Friday", 24),
                        rep("Saturday", 24)),

                hour = rep(1:24, 7),

                value = rnorm(n = 24 * 7)

)


library(reshape2)

# For rows representing hours
acast(x, hour ~ day) 

# For rows representing days
acast(x, day ~ hour) 

# If you want to preserve the ordering of the days, just make x$day a factor
# unique(x$day) conveniently gives the right order here, but you'd always want
# check that (and make sure the factor reflects the original value - that's why
# I'm making a new variable instead of overwriting the old one)
x$day.f <- factor(x$day, levels = unique(x$day))

acast(x, hour ~ day.f)
acast(x, day.f ~ hour)

The three-column dataset you have is an example of what's called "molten data" - each row represents a single result (x$value) with one or more identifiers (here, x$day and x$hour). The little formula inside of acast lets you express how you'd like your new dataset to be configured - variable names to the left of the tilde are used to define rows, and variable names to the right to define columns. In this case, there's only one column left - x$value - so it's automatically used to fill in the result matrix.

It took me a while to wrap my brain around all of that, but it's an incredibly powerful to think about reshaping data.

share|improve this answer
    
I was just about to press enter with the same thing, but while I was typing up a snide comment about reproducible examples... You ninja'ed me. ;) –  N8TRO Feb 20 '13 at 23:59
1  
@NathanG Ha! I always post the meat of the answer first and edit the snide comments in later ;) –  Matt Parker Feb 21 '13 at 0:08
    
I love/hate how acast/dcast alphabetizes the new columns: F, M, Sa, Su, Th, T, W. –  N8TRO Feb 21 '13 at 0:15
    
Thanks, this is great -- as @NathanG mentioned -- is there anyway to have acast not alphabetize columns? –  araspion Feb 21 '13 at 0:20
1  
In these types of cases, xtabs from base R also works quite well. –  Ananda Mahto Feb 21 '13 at 5:02

Something like this (assuming dfrm is the data object):

 M <- matrix( NA, nrow=24, ncol=2, 
         dimnames = list(Hours = 1:24, Days=unique(dfrm$weekday) ) )
 M[ cbind(dfrm$hour, dfrm$weekday) ] <- dfrm$value

> M
     Days
Hours           M         SU
   1   1.11569683         NA
   2  -0.44550495         NA
   3  -0.82566259         NA
   4  -0.81427790         NA
   5   0.08277568         NA
   6   1.36057839         NA
   7           NA         NA
   8           NA         NA
   9           NA         NA
   10          NA         NA
   11          NA         NA
   12          NA  0.1284261
   13          NA  0.4469719
   14          NA  0.8654996
   15          NA -0.2233332
   16          NA  1.7595516
   17          NA -0.2890447
   18          NA -0.7882661
   19          NA -0.7852023
   20          NA -0.1930103
   21          NA  0.6528116
   22          NA  0.3799362
   23          NA -1.5880690
   24          NA -0.2672591

Or you could just "fold the values" if they are "dense":

 M <- matrix(dfrm$value, 24, 7)

And then rename your dimensions accordingly. Tested code provided when actual test cases provided.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks -- I have updated the original post with sample data. –  araspion Feb 21 '13 at 0:06
    
I illustrated with the data you gave. –  BondedDust Feb 21 '13 at 1:14
    
@DWin, +1 for the matrix(dfrm$value, 24, 7) option. I think you could safely delete everything before "or you could just...". –  Ananda Mahto Feb 21 '13 at 4:57

This is pretty straightforward with xtabs in base R:

output <- as.data.frame.matrix(xtabs(value ~ hour + weekday, data))
head(output)
#            SU          M           T           W         TH           F         SA
# 1 -0.56902302 -0.4434357 -1.02356300 -0.38459296  0.7098993 -0.54780300  1.5232637
# 2  0.01023058 -0.2559043 -2.79688932 -1.65322029 -1.5150986  0.05566206 -0.6706817
# 3  0.18461405  1.2783761 -0.02509352 -1.36763623 -0.4978633  0.20300678  1.4211054
# 4  0.54194889  0.5681317  0.69391876 -1.35805959  0.4208977  1.65256590  0.3622756
# 5 -1.68048536 -1.9274994  0.24036908 -0.21959772  0.7654983  1.62773579  0.6760743
# 6 -1.39398673  1.7251476  0.36563174  0.04554249 -0.2991433 -1.47331314 -0.7647513

TO get the days in the right order (as above), use factor on your "weekday" variable before doing the xtabs step:

data$weekday <- factor(data$weekday, 
                       levels = c("SU", "M", "T", "W", "TH", "F", "SA"))
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I always forget that xtabs is so versatile. (And thank you for catching the typo in my answer) –  Matt Parker Feb 21 '13 at 16:42

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