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In C, is it not possible to make the return type an array? I'm starting to learn about pointers in my operating systems course and I need to make a function that takes 2 arrays as parameters and returns an array containing only the elements that are in both parameter arrays.

This is what I have so far for my C function that returns an array:

#include <stdio.h>



main() 
{
    printf("Hello world");

    int array1[4] = {1, 2, 3, 4};
    int array2[4] = {3, 4, 5, 6};

    int* inter = intersection(array1, array2);

printf(inter); // <-- also, I don't know how I could get this to work for testing


    //freezes program so it doesn't terminate immediately upon running:
    getchar();
}





int* intersection(int array1[], int array2[])
{       
    int arrayReturn[sizeof(array1) + sizeof(array2)];
    int count = 0;

    for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        for(int j = 0; j < 4; j++)
        {
            if(array1[i]==array2[j])
            {

                arrayReturn[count] = array1[i];
                count = count + 1;

            }
        }
    }

    return arrayReturn;
}

Another question I have is how could I test this function in the main() method using a printf() statement?

The reason why I need to do this is because we're learning about processes and memory allocation and pointers play a big role in OS development. My professor told me that pointers are so difficult to understand that they leave pointers out of many programming languages.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

here we go

#include <stdio.h>

/* declare function, you need to capture array size as well, and also allow 
   to get result target pointer, result space info and pointer to place where the
   size of result will be captured */
int* intersection(int * array1, int a1len , int * array2, int a2len, int* result, int *resultsize, int resultspace);

main()
{
    printf("Hello world\n");

    int array1[4] = {1, 2, 3, 4};
    int array2[4] = {3, 4, 5, 6};
    int arrayr[32]; /*result will be in this table */
    int resultsize;
    int resultspace = 32;

    int i;
    /* here comes confusion - int resultsize means it will be read as integer,
       so we need to write &resultsize to get the pointer,
       array declaration like int arrayr[number] is actually understood by system
       as a pointer to an integer, pointing to first element of array,
       allowing you to use indexes 
       so arrayr[3] actually means *(arrayr + 3 * sizeof(int))
    */

    int* inter = intersection(array1, 4, array2, 4, arrayr, &resultsize, resultspace);
    /* inter is now a pointer to arrayr */
    for (i = 0; i<resultsize; i=i+1) {
                printf("%d\n", inter[i]);
        }


    //freezes program so it doesn't terminate immediately upon running:
    getchar();
}





int* intersection(int * array1, int a1len , int * array2, int a2len, int* result, int *resultsize, int resultspace)
{
    /* as we received a pointer to resultsize (*resultsize)
       we need to de-reference it using "*" to get or set the actual value */

    *resultsize = 0;

    int i, j;
    for(i = 0; i < a1len; i++)
    {
        for(j = 0; j < a2len; j++)
        {
            if(array1[i]==array2[j])
            {

                result[*resultsize] = array1[i];
                *resultsize = *resultsize + 1;
                if (resultspace == *resultsize)
                        return result;
            }
        }
    }

    return result;
}
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1  
As a minor addition: it would be valuable to return result; from intersection() when the result array runs out of space, instead of returning nothing. –  Simon Feb 21 '13 at 1:16
    
valid point, i was too fast. code updated as suggested –  January Piwoniusz Feb 21 '13 at 1:26

In C, is it not possible to make the return type an array?

No. Some of the characteristics that differentiate arrays from pointers are:

  1. sizeof array evaluates to n * sizeof *array, where n is the number of elements, instead of the size of a pointer.
  2. &array evaluates to a pointer to an array, instead of a pointer to a pointer.
  3. You can use an array to initialise an array to initialise a pointer, eg. int *ptr = (int[]){ 1, 2, 3, 4 };, but you can't use a pointer to initialise an array, eg. int array[4] = ptr;.
  4. You can't assign to an array eg. int array[4]; array = (int[]){ 1, 2, 3, 4 };, but you can assign to a pointer: int *ptr; ptr = (int[]){ 1, 2, 3, 4 };, unless the pointer is declared as a const pointer to int, eg. int * const ptr = NULL; ptr = (int[]){ 1, 2, 3, 4 };

I'm starting to learn about pointers in my operating systems course and I need to make a function that takes 2 arrays as parameters and returns an array containing only the elements that are in both parameter arrays.

This isn't possible. Firstly, your array arguments are actually pointer arguments. Look at sizeof array1 and sizeof array2. Try to initialise an array with them. Try to assign to them. How many of the tests above seem to indicate that they're pointers? When you pass an array to a function, the array expression evaluates to a pointer to the first element of the array. Perhaps you'd want to declare your function to accept pointer to arrays, eg:

int *intersection(size_t sz1, int (*array1)[sz1], // array1 is a pointer to int[sz1]
                  size_t sz2, int (*array2)[sz2]) // array2 is a pointer to int[sz2]
{ ... }

Secondly, your function clearly returns a pointer value, not an array. Regarding that return value, arrayReturn is declared inside intersection as an array that has automatic storage duration, and so it will be destroyed when intersection returns. When main attempts to use that value, it'll be attempting to use a destroyed array. Returning an array using automatic storage duration isn't possible. Returning a fixed-size struct using automatic storage duration is possible, but this isn't helpful for your problem because your return value would need to be dynamic in size.

Another question I have is how could I test this function in the main() method using a printf() statement?

You can't do anything with the return value of that function, because using an object that has been destroyed is undefined behaviour.

The reason why I need to do this is because we're learning about processes and memory allocation and pointers play a big role in OS development.

The C programming language is independant of OS implementations; It doesn't matter if an OS delays the destruction of objects with automatic storage duration. If you use a destroyed object, you're invoking undefined behaviour.

My professor told me that pointers are so difficult to understand that they leave pointers out of many programming languages.

Has he/she written out his/her lesson plan? If not, then he/she is missing a crucial point where improvement can be identified. How successful has his/her written lesson plan been in the past? If it's been 100% successful, it doesn't make sense to be using words like "difficult"; Why would you want to unnecessarily trigger overwhelming feelings in students? If parts are too complex, then it makes more sense to identify and clarify those parts, rather than identifying those parts and specifying them as "difficult". It also makes no sense to mention other programming languages in a course about C.

When a professor's lesson plan becomes fairly successful, it becomes feasible to publish it as a book. One example is K&R's "The C Programming Language, Second Edition". Do you have a book?

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