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I have to convert a given binary input (e.g. 1101) to decimal, but the input isn't a string array or an integer (the passed argument is const char *binstr). How am I supposed to access each individual digit of the binary number so I can do pow(x,y) on each and add them together to get the decimal number?

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Depends on the encoding... –  Bingo Feb 21 '13 at 0:23
    
Can you show a complete definition of what your input looks like? –  Carl Norum Feb 21 '13 at 0:24
    
What exactly do you mean by "binary input"? Your binstr points to the first element of an array of char elements; are those characters printable digits '0' and '1', or are they numeric values 0 and 1, or are they something else? –  Keith Thompson Feb 21 '13 at 0:47
    
I just meant that the input is a series of 0s and 1s. In main it's initialized as char binstr[10];, then scanf("%s", binstr); and output[i] = binTodec(binstr); are in a for loop, calling the function, binTodec that I'm trying to write. I don't really know how I can get them to be treated as integers, since I want to do binstr[1]*pow(2,2) for example which should be 1*4 = 4. –  Adam Feb 21 '13 at 0:51

4 Answers 4

const char * usually refers to a C string. You can just use strtol(3):

int x = strtol(binstr, NULL, 2);
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You could try with this program which converts from Binary to Decimal

char *binstr = "1011011";
int   num = 0, sum = 0, ctr = 0;

ctr = strlen(binstr) - 1;
do{
    sum += ((binstr[ctr] & 0x1) << num);
    ctr--;
    num ++;
}while(ctr >= 0);
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1  
(binstr[ctr] & 0x1) makes an assumption about the numerical representation of the characters '0' and '1'. The assumption is almost certainly valid, but unless you really need to squeeze the last CPU cycle out of your code, it's better to be clearer. –  Keith Thompson Feb 21 '13 at 0:41
    
In the question, it is mentioned that the input is a binary string. Hence, the code is written considering only 2 symbols 0 and 1. I am not sure if I understood your point completely. –  Ganesh Feb 21 '13 at 0:44
    
I assumed (and I still assume) that the string consists of the digits '0' and '1', not 0 and 1. Perhaps I'm mistaken; the question is not entirely clear. –  Keith Thompson Feb 21 '13 at 0:46
binstr[0];
binstr[1];
binstr[2];

etc

or you can do it through a pointer

char* s = binstr;
unsigned long x =0;
while(*s) { x = x << 1; x |= (*s == '1' ? 1:0); s++;} 
printf("the decimal of %s is %ul", binstr, x);
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I can't seem to get binstr[i] to give the right output though. If I try to print an element of this like printf("%d", binstr[2]);, I don't get the right output e.g. with char *binstr = "1101";, I get 49 for binstr[0], binstr[1] and binstr[3], and 48 for binstr[2]. –  Adam Feb 21 '13 at 0:38
    
oh, its a character printf("%c", binstr[2]); will print the character.... the character '1' is hex 31 ... you could do printf("%d", binstr[2] - 0x30); and that would give what you are expecting I think –  Keith Nicholas Feb 21 '13 at 0:39
    
48 is the ASCII encoding for the character '0'. If c is either '0' or '1', then c - '0' is 0 or 1. –  Keith Thompson Feb 21 '13 at 0:40

You've made a c string and you can get each character the way similar to arrays:

input[i]

Here's an example of splitting the binary string into individual bits (characters) and printing them out: http://cfiddle.net/wYtKJv

You can use loops:

while(i<100){

if(binstr[i]== '\0'){
   break;
}

printf("First Bit:\n%c\n\n",binstr[i]);
i++;
}

Since C-strings are null terminated you can check to see if a character if we hit is '\0' to break the loop.

In the loop you can also convert the chars to ints and store them someplace (array probably) where you can access them for calculations.

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I can't seem to get binstr[i] to give the right output though. If I try to print an element of this like printf("%d", binstr[2]);, I don't get the right output e.g. with char *binstr = "1101";, I get 49 for binstr[0], binstr[1] and binstr[3], and 48 for binstr[2]. –  Adam Feb 21 '13 at 0:34
    
I don;'t know why you chose to loop 100 times, but you should really just use while(*ptr) { /* ... */ } –  Ed S. Feb 21 '13 at 0:35
    
@EdS. Well, that was an exaggeration depending on how big the decimal number may be. –  turnt Feb 21 '13 at 0:38
1  
@Adam You're using the format %d which is for ints. Remember, we haven't converted to ints yet. Thus, do printf("%c", binstr[2]); –  turnt Feb 21 '13 at 0:39
1  
NULL is a null pointer constant; don't use the name NULL to refer to the null character, which is '\0'. I've fixed it. –  Keith Thompson Feb 21 '13 at 0:42

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