Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have a function in program

int main(){
   char *name = "New Holland";
   modify(name);
   printf("%s\n",name);
}

that calls this function

void modify(char *s){
   char new_name[10] = "Australia";
   s = new_name;         /* How do I correct this? */
}

how can I update the value of the string literal name (which now equals new Holland) with Australia.

The problem I think that I face is the new_name is local storage, so after the function returns, the variable is not stored

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

Try this:

#include <stdio.h>

void modify(char **s){
  char *new_name = "Australia";
  *s = new_name;
}

int main(){
  char *name = "New Holland";
  modify(&name);
  printf("%s\n", name);
  return 0;
}

If you define new_name as an array then it will become a local variable, instead the above defines a pointer, to a string literal. Also, in C the parameters are passed by value, so you need to pass pointers to objects you want to modify.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Try this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

#define MAX_NAME_LEN  50

void modify(char *mdf){
  char *new_name = "Australia";
  strcpy(mdf,new_name);
}

int main(){
  char name[MAX_NAME_LEN] = "New Holland";
  modify(name);
  printf("%s\n", name);
  return 0;
}

use strcpy/memcpy to bing a local array variable to an outer string literal.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.