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Here's my structure A

struct A {
    int a1;
    int a2;
    ~A() { }
};

B is another structure that contains a pointer to A

 struct B {
    B(int b, A* a)
      : b1(b), ptr2A(a)
    {}
    int b1;
    A* ptr2A;

    ~B() {
         delete b1;
         // traverse each element pointed to by A, delete them <----
    }
};

Later on I use below code

int bb1;
vector <A*> aa1;
// do some stuff
B *ptrB = new B(bb1, aa1);

I need to delete/free all the memory pointed to by ptrB. Hence I need to write correct destructor inside struct B. How do I traverse each element pointed to by A and delete them?

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You need a C++ book. You're trying to mix and match things from C and trying to delete automatic variables. Further, there is nothing to traverse in A - you just delete ptr2A. –  Yuushi Feb 21 '13 at 2:57
1  
Why you delete b1? –  StarPinkER Feb 21 '13 at 2:57
    
possible duplicate of How to write destructor when i have pointers in class? –  jogojapan Feb 21 '13 at 3:44
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're using a C++11 compiler, just use std::shared_ptr and you don't have to worry about deletes. This is because the shared_ptr is a "smart" pointer that will automatically delete what its pointing to.

#include <memory>
struct B 
{
    int b1;
    std::shared_ptr<A> ptr2A;
    B(int b, std::shared_ptr<A> a):b1(b),ptr2A(a)({}
    ~B(){} //look ma! no deletes!
};

Use a shared pointer whenever you allocate something:

#include<memory>
...
{
    ....
    std::shared_ptr<B> ptrB( new B(bb1, aa1) );
    //Here is another, more readable way of doing the same thing:
    //auto ptrB = std::make_shared<B>(bb1,aa1);
    ...
}
//no memory leaks here, because B is automatically destroyed

Here's more info on the subject of smart pointers.

I should also mention that if you don't have a C++11 compiler, you can get shared pointers from the BOOST library.

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Sorry. I took long to type. I have added details to the question. I use the new operator later on –  user13107 Feb 21 '13 at 3:08
    
Thanks! So you mean I just need to do a delete ptrB and it will all be taken care of? –  user13107 Feb 21 '13 at 3:13
    
As long as you use smart pointers, you don't need to do deletes. There are various types of smart pointers, but start off with the shared_ptr for now. –  C.. Feb 21 '13 at 3:15
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You've only got one pointer to A. So you only need to delete that:

~B() {
     delete ptr2A;
}

Note that you can't delete b1, since it's a plain int! (The memory taken up by the variables of the structure, such as b1 and the pointer ptr2A itself (not what it points to) are destroyed automatically along with any instances of that structure.)

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Sorry. I took long to type. I have added details to the question. I use the new operator later on –  user13107 Feb 21 '13 at 3:08
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You need only to delete objects allocated by new. In this case there's no need to delete b1 as it has not been dynamically-allocated. Moreover, if you did not initialize ptr2a with dynamic memory, deleting it is undefined behavior.

So there's no need to worry about deleting As data as it will be destructed from memory along wih the instance of the class.

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Sorry. I took long to type. I have added details to the question. I use the new operator later on. –  user13107 Feb 21 '13 at 3:07
    
All you need to do is use delete ptrB when you're done using the memory it points to. Don't do that inside the class, do it inside main where you defined it. –  0x499602D2 Feb 21 '13 at 3:10
    
Ah. I was under the impression that the code delete ptrB will call destructor of B. So we have to do it (freeing memory pointed to by aa1) inside destructor of B. –  user13107 Feb 21 '13 at 3:17
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