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I'm using the two fake subdirectories at the beginning in this form of URL to denote region and language:

/gb/en/tours/lesson-observation

This regular expression matches when the two fake subdirectories at the beginning are 2-3 and 2-5 characters long respectively. (Side note: I'm not sure why I have to use {1,2} here instead of {2,3}.)

/^\/.{1,2}[^\/]\/.{1,4}[^\/]\/(.*)/

When the requested URL doesn't match the ^/2-3chars/2-5chars/ pattern, how can I grab the whole of the originally-requested URL so that I can redirect to /gb/en$1. (This is desired because the UK region and English language version of the site is the default, and so should be used if region and language codes are not found in the requested URL.)

Example:

/page-name
is not matched by the /2-3/2-5 pattern and so should be redirected to:
/gb/en/page-name

/ca/fr/page-name
is matched by the /2-3/2-5 pattern and so should not be redirected
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Why use a regex? Why not just parse out the individual segments with PHP? –  nickb Feb 21 '13 at 3:39
    
I'm using a URL Router extension within a PHP CMF framework that works with regex. –  David Oliver Feb 21 '13 at 3:40
    
It only works with regex? Also, you have to use {1,2} instead of {2,3} because you're consuming a character with [^\/], which is "match any character that is not a backslash". Same reason for {1,4} –  nickb Feb 21 '13 at 3:43
    
Yes, in this case I'd like to keep this particular functionality (routing/redirection) within the extension settings, which only works with regex. Thanks for the info on the number of characters. –  David Oliver Feb 21 '13 at 3:47
    
@DavidOliver if i got ur question right u want to match any word that is longer then 2 characters? if so then u can use [A-Za-z1-9-]{3,} –  Breezer Feb 21 '13 at 4:01

1 Answer 1

To match this:

/gb/en/tours/lesson-observation

You can use:

/[^/]{2,3}/[^/]{2,5}/.*

Now, you need to detect when the first two segments are not within those ranges, so the first segment is higher or lower than 2 - 3 characters:

/[^/]?/                   <-- 0 or 1 characters
/[^/]{4,}/                <-- 4 or more characters
/(?:[^/]?|[^/]{4,})/     <-- Combine the above two with an OR (|)

Similarly, for the second segment:

/(?:[^/]?|[^/]{5,})/     <-- 0 or 1 characters, or 5 or more characters

Put both together, and you have a regex for anything that doesn't match our very first regex:

/(?:[^/]?|[^/]{4,})/(?:[^/]?|[^/]{5,})/.*

Note in all of these regular expressions I've omitted delimiters, but remember you don't have to use / as the delimiter. You can use # or ~ or whatever character you want. The benefit: If you don't use / as a delimiter, this allows you to leave / unescaped within the final regex:

#/(?:[^/]?|[^/]{4,})/(?:[^/]?|[^/]{5,})/.*#   <-- # is the delimiter

Edit: Since the second URL segment is optional, we need something like this for the second segment:

(?:/(?:[^/]?|[^/]{5,})/)?

Bringing that back into the full regex, we get (with anchors and delimiters:

#^/(?:[^/]?|[^/]{4,})(?:/(?:[^/]?|[^/]{5,})/)?.*$#
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Note that you'll also want to use anchors ^ and $ for the start and end of string. –  nickb Feb 21 '13 at 4:07
    
Thanks very much. Your new version of my original regex is clearer to me, and the explaining really helps. The one thing left that I need to do when a URL doesn't fall into the ^/2-3chars/2-5chars/ pattern is to grab the whole of the original URL so that I can redirect it to /gb/en/$1. This is because the UK region and English language version is the default, and so should be used if region and language codes are not found in the requested URL. Sorry if I wasn't clearer enough in the last sentence of my question. I've tried wrapping things in brackets but to no avail. –  David Oliver Feb 21 '13 at 14:25
    
Have updated question to match my comment. –  David Oliver Feb 21 '13 at 14:33
    
@David - "/page-name" is missing the second URL segment, so you need to make the regex /(?:[^/]?|[^/]{5,})/ optional. I'll update my answer. –  nickb Feb 21 '13 at 15:00
    
@David - See this example. I've made that part of the regex optional, and added the anchors ^ and $. –  nickb Feb 21 '13 at 15:10

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